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T10s747
02-03-2010, 08:32 AM
What do you do when you realize that your college coach doesn't know what the f#%4? he is doing? You probably know you're not going to be a pro. The coach doesn't know who's good and who's not. There are not enough challenge matches to establish a pecking order of who should start and who should not. There isn't a coherent doubles line up strategy, it's mostly haphazard with partners playing with different doubles partners constantly. There are lineup biases by the coach that don't seem to have any bearing on practice play and results. WTF, is this typical? It takes so much time to be on a team but is it worth it with an incompetent coach? Should one just focus on school work which is ultimately more important and let it go so it doesn't frustrate your day to day enjoyment of college? Thoughts?

andfor
02-03-2010, 06:29 PM
What do you do when you realize that your college coach doesn't know what the f#%4? he is doing? You probably know you're not going to be a pro. The coach doesn't know who's good and who's not. There are not enough challenge matches to establish a pecking order of who should start and who should not. There isn't a coherent doubles line up strategy, it's mostly haphazard with partners playing with different doubles partners constantly. There are lineup biases by the coach that don't seem to have any bearing on practice play and results. WTF, is this typical? It takes so much time to be on a team but is it worth it with an incompetent coach? Should one just focus on school work which is ultimately more important and let it go so it doesn't frustrate your day to day enjoyment of college? Thoughts?

I'm not a college coach but played 4 years of college tennis. The coach who recruited me and coached my freshmen year left at the end of the year. My sophome year our new coach had some severe personal problems, was a jerk and I transfered. Are you a freshman?

Your situation sounds frustrating. But there's really not enough in your post to pass judgement. However there may be a method to your coaches madness. If your coach has a track record of fielding winning teams maybe he does know what he's doing, on some level. Some coaches limit challenge matches so players they like (believe in) or are upper classmen (experienced) play in the line up where the coach wants. The lack of coherency with the doubles may be his way of finding out which combinations perform best in real match situations. Line ups early in the season are often no indication of lineups for conference play or the postseason.

If you're new to the team, be patient. If the coach is a true buffoon you have 3 choices. In this order - 1. Suck it up, practice and play hard and have a good attitude. 2. Transfer. 3. Quit college tennis and focus on school.

My suggestion, if you're a freshman play through your sophmore year and see how your tennis and the team develops. Re-evalutate then. In the meantime pick number 1.

Good luck

Tennis_Stringman
02-03-2010, 08:12 PM
Heavily recruited freshman. He doesn't have a winning record, no one here knows how he got the job 2 years ago over other more qualified applicants. He had all fall to set up doubles teams and the dual season is on and he's no closer deciding the pairings or the starting six. He obviously has favorites who can't win but still play more often. It's a mess but love the school so transferring will not be an option. Coach knows how to take the wind out of peoples' sails. Most friends at other schools complain the same and say it's par for the course. The best strategy is to suck it up and don't take the tennis team too seriously. Hopefully he won't get renewed and the team can move on.

goran_ace
02-04-2010, 06:34 AM
Even in a DI program a lot 'non-revenue' sports coaches aren't full-time coaches (like football or basketball coaches) so its unfortunate that some of them treat it like a part time job.

stanfordtennis alum
02-04-2010, 10:38 AM
Heavily recruited freshman. He doesn't have a winning record, no one here knows how he got the job 2 years ago over other more qualified applicants. He had all fall to set up doubles teams and the dual season is on and he's no closer deciding the pairings or the starting six. He obviously has favorites who can't win but still play more often. It's a mess but love the school so transferring will not be an option. Coach knows how to take the wind out of peoples' sails. Most friends at other schools complain the same and say it's par for the course. The best strategy is to suck it up and don't take the tennis team too seriously. Hopefully he won't get renewed and the team can move on.

robert,
how's U Penn treating u?

Tennis_Stringman
02-04-2010, 11:06 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1w4CdfWuxs

Tennis_Stringman
02-04-2010, 11:10 AM
I told him that the video was well done. It shows he's enthusiastic and has good foot speed. The only thing is that his technique and grips is rather extreme, he needs to have a continental grip for volleys and his serve needs more balance and less extraneous movement. He'll be fine for D2, or D3 where he wants to end up.

eeytennis
02-04-2010, 11:23 AM
What do you do when you realize that your college coach doesn't know what the f#%4? he is doing? You probably know you're not going to be a pro. The coach doesn't know who's good and who's not. There are not enough challenge matches to establish a pecking order of who should start and who should not. There isn't a coherent doubles line up strategy, it's mostly haphazard with partners playing with different doubles partners constantly. There are lineup biases by the coach that don't seem to have any bearing on practice play and results. WTF, is this typical? It takes so much time to be on a team but is it worth it with an incompetent coach? Should one just focus on school work which is ultimately more important and let it go so it doesn't frustrate your day to day enjoyment of college? Thoughts?

There are two types of coached who know very little about tennis. There are the ones who KNOW they don't know a lot, and therefore don't do much and let the players do their own thing. Then there are the coaches who don't know a lot yet they try to tell you how to do things, how the line-up should be, and act like know-it-alls even though they seldom know what they are talking about. i am dealing with the 2nd of the two right now with an assistant coach and i am feeling very frustrated as well. But, i am on scholarship so i guess i better keep my mouth shut and ignore him when he tells me to "moonball everything so i can wear my opponent out"...bull.

Big_Dangerous
02-06-2010, 10:26 AM
Yeah played in a friendly tournament last night, it was pretty lame. Coach was a ******. He shut the lights out on people still playing matches at 7....

dragon2o00
02-06-2010, 12:05 PM
i was in the same situation. it really depends on your status on your team. if you are a top player and everyone on the team agrees, the team at my school all boycotted the coach and she "resigned." they then brought in a great coach.

if you're a scrub that barely made the team, and hence, has no real influence but instead is griping about your lack of playing time, you play by the coach's rule and hope you get better. if this is the case, you keep your attitude positive, otherwise you might not even be back next year.

mlewis721
02-06-2010, 01:22 PM
T10s747...you're talking D2 aren't you? I only know three D2 coaches in NY. Jerks with capital J.

tennisjon
02-10-2010, 10:11 AM
I am a D3 assistant coach. There are a few major responsibilities of a head coach. First, you got to recruit players. Secondly, you have to be able to work on players technique, strategy, and fitness. Lastly, you have to be able to communicate with players in practice and in matches. I can tell you a lot of coaches don't know a lot about one or more of those aspects. It helps to have a qualified assistant who can compliment you on those weaknesses. Most programs don't have that either.

So, what are you left with? A place to play tennis, but something that is less than ideal. You can transfer. You can stop playing tennis and enjoy life as a regular student. You can, as a team, have a conversation with the coach as to the decisions being made and what you want to get out of the program.

As a coach, sometimes the decisions that are made may not seem logical or fair to the players on the team. Usually, these issues are for selfish reasons (wanting to be higher on the team or playing with a certain partner). The hope is that the coach is doing what is for the overall best interest of the team. Not all coaches are good at making these decisions.

I would discuss issues with the captains of the team. Bring them up to the coach. If, after doing this, you as a team really feel that the coach is not doing his job correctly or you guys should approach the athletic director.