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View Full Version : n six-one vs. ncode n6(black/white)


isell188
04-28-2005, 06:06 PM
I have been playing with the n six-one, for about a week, and I like the solidness and control especially with my forehand shots. Today, the person I played against let me demo his n6, just to hit back and forth. I like that it feels like you don't have to work as hard to hit a powerful shot with topspin. My question is that I am a 3.0 player and I wanted a racquet to take me to the next level, and I was wondering if I should stick with the n six-one, even though I can't always get the racquet back fast enough on some fast passing shots or on some wide backhand shots.(unless that happens to other people if shots come by them fast). :D

muklucke
04-28-2005, 07:21 PM
Personally if i was a 3.0 player, i would go with the n6 midplus with the 95 head. That racket is good for intermediate players. Its also a good racket to develop your strokes. But dont toss your six one away. When you improve, that six one will be ready for when you switch.

isell188
04-29-2005, 12:05 AM
thanks. I was also reading about the n5 and it seemed to have great feedback. Would that be a better choice than the n6?

johnmcc516
04-29-2005, 04:29 AM
I say stick with the six-one.

AndrewD
04-29-2005, 04:46 AM
I tentatively agree with johnmcc516 that you should stick with your current racquet. Tentatively, as it is impossible to say for sure without actually seeing you play.

The way I see it is, your rating - 3.0 - isn't the cause of your not always getting " the racquet back fast enough on some fast passing shots or on some wide backhand shots". That just comes down to you not preparing early enough. However, because you dont prepare early enough you're rated as a 3.0. So, your rating is a result of poor preparation, not the cause of it. That make any sense?

What I mean is, if you practise preparing early then you'll lift your rating, get to those balls you're missing (fast and wide shots are tough for everyone) and be able to stick with your racquet. Changing the racquet won't actually make you prepare earlier it will just give you a lighter frame to swing. My gut feeling is it will actually allow you to still prepare late but swing quickly to make up for the lateness. That hurried swing could lead to more unforced errors.

So, rather than change your racquet, change your preparation.

Sorry to actually make that suggestion because I hate it when people say 'its the technique not the frame' when all you want is a new racquet suggestion. However, I think the n six-one is a better frame than the n6. Maybe perservere with it for a bit longer - it can take a month or so to adjust to a new frame- before changing, just to make sure it doesn't really suit.

isell188
04-29-2005, 05:23 AM
thanks, Andrew:
I spoke to the guy I played yesterday, and he thought that when I used his n6, that I had more control and hit the shots deeper, than when using my n six-one. I don't know what to do? is it dumb to have one of each?

crosscourt
04-29-2005, 06:02 AM
Don't fight it, find what works best for you. The aim is to win matches.

AndrewD
04-29-2005, 07:37 AM
isell188,

It's not dumb to 'own' one of each (I think a lot of us have different, older frames we just dont want to get rid of LOL) but, I don't think it does your game much good to be 'playing with' two different racquets. So, Id suggest just choose one and stick with it as changing backwards and forwards you'll likely throw your timing out.

If you do prefer the n6 or n5 then go with that by itself. It's really a matter of personal preference as neither one is better than the other, just better suited to you. Be confidant in the fact that they're both very good frames and whichever you choose will do an excellent job.

Other than that, try to get the n6 and n5, have a few demo sessions (not just one, Ive made that mistake before) and weigh up which feels best to you against which gives you the best results. When you do that you'll know which is the best choice.

Good luck and let us know how you go.

johnmcc516
04-29-2005, 08:23 AM
isell188,

It's not dumb to 'own' one of each (I think a lot of us have different, older frames we just dont want to get rid of LOL) but, I don't think it does your game much good to be 'playing with' two different racquets. So, Id suggest just choose one and stick with it as changing backwards and forwards you'll likely throw your timing out.

If you do prefer the n6 or n5 then go with that by itself. It's really a matter of personal preference as neither one is better than the other, just better suited to you. Be confidant in the fact that they're both very good frames and whichever you choose will do an excellent job.

Other than that, try to get the n6 and n5, have a few demo sessions (not just one, Ive made that mistake before) and weigh up which feels best to you against which gives you the best results. When you do that you'll know which is the best choice.

Good luck and let us know how you go.


I am with Andrew. Stick with one racquet.

highsierra
04-29-2005, 12:00 PM
isell188, What's the string tension on your N6 One? The range is 50 - 60 and if you string it at the low end, you'd get a little more pop out of it. I know it's different from a more powerful frame but I guess you don't really need a whole lot more power.

The black/white N6 is lighter and head heavy, that is, much like the Hammer.

Ken
04-29-2005, 12:09 PM
I believe that the n6 provides a little more natural pop, and is less of a "player's racket". Meaning that it'll provide some power for you. The six-one has more control (from what I've tested) and forces YOU to supply the power.

I'd use the six-one personally, since the six-one forces you to become a better player. You might not get immediate results, but it'll force you to improve.

spinbalz
04-29-2005, 12:56 PM
isell188, as you stated the N6 felt easier to play for you, and it is normal for most 3.0 players, but if you decide to continue to play with it you will have a tendancy to prepare later and to develop wristy stroke in general, and especially when you will try to produce sharp angles crosscourt shots. If you play too long with that knid of racquets, it is very possible that you'll never develop really correct stroke mechanics, and perhaps that you will never feel comfortable with a racquet like the nc 6.1 which is the kind of racquets that usually have to be used at higher level when there is more pace in the game.

So what I mean is: use the N6 if you want immediate results and don't really plan to play at much higher level than your current one, but if you do want to develop correct stroke mechanics to become an advanced player, then stick to the nc 6.1, you will play less good at the begining but this way you have more chance to really improve your stroke mechanics, and you will become a better player, but be patient, it will take time, don't expect to become a mini-federer in only 1 month. An other interesting choice of racquet for low level players that want to develop their stroke mechanics is to use a lighter player racquet, like the Head Radical MP (Ti, or I., or LM. or Flexpoint), or like the Wilson nPS 95, or n tour, or N 6.1 team (lighter version of the regular Nc 6.1), or Völkl Tour 9 and Tour 9 V-Engine, or Yonex RDX 500 MP, and several other models.

Nero
05-02-2005, 08:42 PM
So, rather than change your racquet, change your preparation.

Sorry to actually make that suggestion because I hate it when people say 'its the technique not the frame' when all you want is a new racquet suggestion. However, I think the n six-one is a better frame than the n6. Maybe perservere with it for a bit longer - it can take a month or so to adjust to a new frame- before changing, just to make sure it doesn't really suit.

Very very sound advice.. cheers mate! :)