PDA

View Full Version : What do you do when you have disputes between teammates?


gameboy
02-08-2010, 04:26 PM
The other day, I am playing doubles with some random folks as part of the regular club session. During a match, the opponent hits a deep shot over my head and my partner goes to get it (he was by the baseline), as he is moving backwards and hits the shot (which went into the net), he calls it out.

But the ball was in (probably by a foot, I could see the green court color between the ball and the line when it bounced), and I called in. The opponent by the net also said it was in.

I told my partner that the ball was in and it is their point. I thought that would be it, but he was not happy about it. He grumbled about the call for a couple of games.

What would you do in this situation? Would correct your partner? What is the best way to correct a call like this?

OrangePower
02-08-2010, 05:15 PM
The other day, I am playing doubles with some random folks as part of the regular club session. During a match, the opponent hits a deep shot over my head and my partner goes to get it (he was by the baseline), as he is moving backwards and hits the shot (which went into the net), he calls it out.

But the ball was in (probably by a foot, I could see the green court color between the ball and the line when it bounced), and I called in. The opponent by the net also said it was in.

I told my partner that the ball was in and it is their point. I thought that would be it, but he was not happy about it. He grumbled about the call for a couple of games.

What would you do in this situation? Would correct your partner? What is the best way to correct a call like this?

You're absolutely right to correct the call. Of course you should do it in a way that does not put down your partner or make him look like an idiot.

For example, if you say to your partner "Close call... but I think it was in... hard for you to see as you were running... let's give them the benefit of the doubt", then he should be ok with it assuming he's not actually trying to cheat.

Of course if you say "What! NO WAY! That was IN! Sorry opponents, my partner is a crook!", then he's not going to take it well :-)

sureshs
02-09-2010, 08:17 AM
I did that on Sunday when I was cornered into playing some mixed dubs. My partner called a lob out, but I called it in, because I could clearly see that it caught the back of the line, having been pulled in by a strong wind. We didn't have a fight about it though.

jswinf
02-09-2010, 11:05 AM
It's great if you can correct a partner's call with "I had a better look at it" or such and they say fine. But some partners are prone to hissy-fits when "overruled."

I've thought of a psychological approach in such a situation (truthfully I haven't tried it yet) that would go like:


Me: "You know how in singles, if you're not sure if the ball was in or out, you need to call it in?"

Partner: "Well, yeah, but that was out, dammit!"

Me: "You saw it out, but I saw it in. One of us is wrong, could be you, could be me, but as a team--we're not sure if it was out, so we need to call it in."

Partner: "You are very wise. May I kiss the hem of your garment?"

Me: "No."

Or something like that.

Cindysphinx
02-09-2010, 11:09 AM
Me: "Uh oh. I did it again."

Partner: "Did what again?"

Me: "I saw that ball is good and I held my hand down. The other team probably saw it. Since I saw it in, let's give them the point so we don't get into trouble. Darn. I am so very stupid. Would you like to kiss the hem of my garment?"

Partner: "No thanks, I'm good."

Inner Game
02-16-2010, 02:17 PM
The other day, I am playing doubles with some random folks as part of the regular club session. During a match, the opponent hits a deep shot over my head and my partner goes to get it (he was by the baseline), as he is moving backwards and hits the shot (which went into the net), he calls it out.

But the ball was in (probably by a foot, I could see the green court color between the ball and the line when it bounced), and I called in. The opponent by the net also said it was in.

I told my partner that the ball was in and it is their point. I thought that would be it, but he was not happy about it. He grumbled about the call for a couple of games.

What would you do in this situation? Would correct your partner? What is the best way to correct a call like this?



That's 100% correct...NEVER take a point you don't deserve!

gameboy
02-16-2010, 03:02 PM
OK, what about this scenario?

I am taking a serve. When I am returning a serve, I like to hunker down low. The server hits a nice low flat serve down the T about half way up.

I am hunkered down behind the baseline so my viewing angle is bad and I cannot tell if the ball was in or not since anything within 3 or 4 inches, I cannot tell apart. But my doubles partner is standing right at the T and calls it out.

The opponent challenges the call and asks me if it was out. I tell them truthfully that I had a bad angle and I have no idea, but since my partner was right on top of it, he gets to make the call.

The opponent says since I am not sure, the ball should be called in.

Who is correct?

kylebarendrick
02-16-2010, 04:54 PM
If your partner is sure of their call and you did not see anything to contradict them, then your partner's call stands. Both players don't have to be sure to make a call - only the player actually making the call needs to be sure.

Ripper014
02-20-2010, 10:17 AM
This is pretty simple... just make the correct call. I hate to overrule a partner... but if it is obvious... I just make the correction. On a close call that I don't get a good look at I will defer to my partner. But then I will call my own shots out... if I see it.

kylebarendrick
02-23-2010, 06:42 PM
When someone makes a bad line call it is generally a mistake. I can deal with that. When their partner chooses not to overrule an obviously bad call - then they are a liar and a cheater.

J_R_B
02-23-2010, 08:14 PM
OK, what about this scenario?

I am taking a serve. When I am returning a serve, I like to hunker down low. The server hits a nice low flat serve down the T about half way up.

I am hunkered down behind the baseline so my viewing angle is bad and I cannot tell if the ball was in or not since anything within 3 or 4 inches, I cannot tell apart. But my doubles partner is standing right at the T and calls it out.

The opponent challenges the call and asks me if it was out. I tell them truthfully that I had a bad angle and I have no idea, but since my partner was right on top of it, he gets to make the call.

The opponent says since I am not sure, the ball should be called in.

Who is correct?

I think you are still OK as long as your partner has no doubt it was out. But either way, you should try to develop a reaction to just say "his call is correct" or something like that if you don't see it. You definitely should overrule a partner on a call that you see is wrong, but if you don't see it and he has no doubt, then just make sure you back him up and move on.

jswinf
02-24-2010, 11:33 AM
There's always going to be some gray areas with 2 partners looking at the same call. Seems like it ought to go like:

Parter A and Partner B both see the ball clearly out or in, no problem.

One partner says clearly out, one says clearly in, call=in, even if parter calling out is positive, moans, complains and carries on.

One partner says clearly out, other partner didn't see it well enough to have an opinion, positive partner makes the call. Of course in singles, the call would be in, player that didn't see it well doesn't have a partner to make the call.

One partner says clearly out, other partner thought it was maybe in but isn't positive. You've gotta figure call= out. Unfair to other team? Maybe, but is it fair to overrule a partner's positive call with your "maybe?" Again, in singles call= in if you're not certain it's out.

So if your partner calls a ball out and you're positive they were wrong, you have an obligation to change that call to good even if it enrages your partner. But if you didn't get a good look at it or thought it looked good but just aren't sure, I don't think you have a right to overrule your partner's certainty.

Unless they're a damn cheater, then who wants to play with or against them anyhow?