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montx
04-29-2005, 10:04 PM
Ok!

This is sort of important here! If there is a racquet that weights 12 oz and has a swingweight of 315 and there is a racquet that weighs 11 oz and has a swingweight of 315, would it be fair to assume the racquets are probably even in maneuverability and moving around weight or is the 12 oz going to be predictably heavier across the board.

This leave me to some confusion!! Should I be checking for a racquets swingweight or the weight!?

rich s
04-30-2005, 05:30 AM
they should be equally easy to swing because they have the same swingweight/inertia.

the 11 oz racquet probably won't be as stable and is going to be more head heavy than the 12 oz racquet in order to have the same swingweight.

Because the 11 oz racquet is more head heavy it might give you the illusion/sensation that it weighs more but the 12oz racquet will fatigue your arm quicker.

my $.02
rich

Coda
04-30-2005, 06:49 PM
swinging the racket will feel the same, but actually moving the 12 oz racket into position will be harder

montx
04-30-2005, 08:33 PM
Hmm things are becoming clearer now!

Mies
05-02-2005, 01:18 AM
Swingweight is only an indication of how easy/difficult it is to move the racket with respect to your wrist! As far as your wrist will be concerned, moving both will feel the same.

However, you have more than one axis of rotation to consider when swinging a frame: your elbow and shoulder. For this, the overall mass of the racket is more important than the balance and/or swingweight. This is so because of the larger distance of your racket with respect to the considered axis of rotation: the larger this distance, the less important the weight distribution of your racket is.

So, if we assume swingweights to be equal, an 11 oz. frame is easier to swing than an 12 oz. racket when you consider the axis of rotation to be your shoulder and (to a lesser degree) your elbow. They will be about equally easy/difficult to move with respect to your wrist.

To get the complete picture, look at both the swingweight and total weight. You could consider the swingweight to be a measure for how "whippy" the racket is and total weight as an indication of how difficult it is to get the frame moving as a whole.

I hope this shed some light on the matter :) ....

Regards,
Maurice

montx
05-02-2005, 06:17 AM
Yes, thanks that is a lot more info

montx
05-02-2005, 06:25 AM
TW defines Swingweight as follows if you go to learning center then to Racquet and Stringing Terms, scroll down...

Swingweight: Measure of how heavy a racquet feels when swung, i.e. maneuverability. Also known as Moment of Inertia or Second Moment, swingweight is dependent on several factors, including racquet weight, length, balance, head size. A heavy swingweight racquet is more powerful than a light swingweight racquet (ATBE), but will be less maneuverable. Also, a heavy swingweight racquet can be relatively light in overall weight by placing the majority of weight in the head. A trend initiated by Wilson with their Hammer racquets, the objective is to retain maneuverability without sacrificing power by distributing most of the overall weight to the upper hoop, where ball contact is made. Swingweight can be increased by adding weight above the pivot point (where the racquet is gripped) or by increasing length. Swingweight (like overall weight) cannot be reduced unless the bumper is removed or racquet length is reduced. Keep this in mind when selecting a racquet to purchase - better to error on the light side and add weight if needed.

joe sch
05-02-2005, 07:35 AM
they should be equally easy to swing because they have the same swingweight/inertia.

the 11 oz racquet probably won't be as stable and is going to be more head heavy than the 12 oz racquet in order to have the same swingweight.

Because the 11 oz racquet is more head heavy it might give you the illusion/sensation that it weighs more but the 12oz racquet will fatigue your arm quicker.

my $.02
rich
All true and also consider that since the heavier racket is more stable, you will have less miss hits, racket torqing and probably do much better in volleying. Once you are comfortable with heavier rackets, you can start letting the racket do alot more of the work hitting the ball. This may seem counter intuitive