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robJAR
02-11-2010, 01:34 PM
Hey everyone, just wanted to ask a few things about interval training.

I go to the gym pretty much everyday after my classes, and i'm pretty sure i've built up enough strength and endurance to start interval training. I'm doing self-conditioning for the upcoming college tennis season and i also heard this is a better way of losing body fat and gaining speed (I'm also trying to lose fat overall). My diet is steady and good, no junk foods, ice cream, etc.

Can anyone tell me how i should do interval training? Is it like a brisk walk (4mph on my gym's 'mill) for about 2 minutes, followed by approx 8-9mph for 30 seconds - 1 minute? And repeat for however long i can go?

Also, when should i perform this? Typically i stretch, followed by 1 mile under 10 minutes as a warmup, followed by weights, then about another mile to cool down.

Input is appreciated.

-robJAR

T Woody
02-11-2010, 01:40 PM
Interval training on a treadmill sucksssss. If you have to do it and can't get to a track, the best way I ever found was to warm up for about ten minutes and slowly crank up the pace and elevation. Then get up to a pretty fast pace (like 9 or 10) and elevation. Run hard at this pace for anywhere from 30s to a minute then grab the sidebars and jump so you're straddling the belt. Stand there and rest for about a minute then jump back on and go for another 30s to a minute. Repeat like 10 times. And try not to kill yourself. That's the only way to do it that kept me sane because cranking the pace up and down over and over is beyond frustrating.

robJAR
02-11-2010, 01:48 PM
I definitely would do it on a track since it's 5 minutes away from where i live, but we just got hit pretty hard with snow and it's going to take a while before it melts.. And i'm not a big fan of running in the cold when i have the option to run indoors lol.

And the treadmills i use come with easy buttons.. This might sound dumb but yeah, if you want 4mph, press 4, 5mph press 5, etc., so it's simple for me. Oh i tried that whole jumping off thing, and yeah i'm too paranoid i'm going to miss and trip. Too dangerous for me :\

-robJAR

alan_kt_wong
02-11-2010, 02:02 PM
For my own stamina training this winter, I don't feel like I've needed a treadmill, a stairmaster or an elliptical.

I've been doing lots of plyometrics, jump rope and weight lifts with dumbbells. With the first two, there's no need to even go to the gym. A garage can do just fine.

I would recommend that you buy Roetert's Complete Conditioning for Tennis (http://bit.ly/bdyF85) if you're serious about figuring out your own fitness program.

SlapShot
02-11-2010, 02:13 PM
Interval training on a treadmill sucksssss. If you have to do it and can't get to a track, the best way I ever found was to warm up for about ten minutes and slowly crank up the pace and elevation. Then get up to a pretty fast pace (like 9 or 10) and elevation. Run hard at this pace for anywhere from 30s to a minute then grab the sidebars and jump so you're straddling the belt. Stand there and rest for about a minute then jump back on and go for another 30s to a minute. Repeat like 10 times. And try not to kill yourself. That's the only way to do it that kept me sane because cranking the pace up and down over and over is beyond frustrating.

That's a pretty dangerous way to do it.

If you've got a treadmill with an interval button, you set your run and jog speeds. Run speed should be as hard as you can go for 45s-1m (for me, it's right around 10.5-11 mph).

I warm up for 5-6 mins slow, then do a 1:3 interval (1m hard, 3m light jog). 25 minutes of this should make you want to puke.

robJAR
02-11-2010, 02:19 PM
I warm up for 5-6 mins slow, then do a 1:3 interval (1m hard, 3m light jog). 25 minutes of this should make you want to puke.

Just the input i was looking for. I appreciate it thank you so much.

From my original post, when should i do this in my workout?

-robJAR

charliefedererer
02-11-2010, 02:22 PM
The idea in high intensity interval training is to get to up to sprint, or near sprint speeds for a short burst, then rest about twice or three times as long as your high speed run, then keep repeating.

As you first start this training your "sprints" may have to be shorter and your rest intervals a little longer than you like. But keep at it and the conditioning will come around until you can do some of the harder interval training routines listed above.

Also, there is something about our competitive nature that if you time it, you will be fighting to break your best times, and get feedback that indeed you are making progress.

SlapShot
02-11-2010, 02:25 PM
Just the input i was looking for. I appreciate it thank you so much.

From my original post, when should i do this in my workout?

-robJAR

If I'm doing intervals, I don't do anything else on that day. I can run long distance after lifting at an 80% pace, but to go into anaerobic mode after lifting would probably be counterproductive.

If I were you, I'd do intervals 1-2x per week, and not more. It will take a lot out of you if done properly, and that's the point.

I would also add that you will NEED to stretch after running to prevent getting tight, which would result in injury over time.

mike53
02-12-2010, 10:40 AM
Just the input i was looking for. I appreciate it thank you so much.

From my original post, when should i do this in my workout?

-robJAR

Right before you warm down and shower. Try 90 seconds at 80% of your maximum heart rate followed by 30 seconds walk or jog. Work your way up to 10 or 12 sets. Remember that the greatest training effect occurs in the last work interval(s).

Power Player
02-12-2010, 12:02 PM
Here is a killer HIIT/full body workout. Do it in order. DO NOT SPRINT ON A TREADMILL, IT SUCKS:

1. 5-7 minute warm up jog
2. 15 30 yard sprints. Take no more then 10 second rests in between
3. 3 sets of 10 pullups
4. 50 pushups
5. 50 weighted lunges
6. 3 sets of 10 lower back pulls.

This workout develops your entire core for tennis and the initial sprints test your stamina to finish the other exercises.

tricky
02-12-2010, 12:45 PM
[QUOTE]From my original post, when should i do this in my workout?/QUOTE]

Always goes last. Pretty much won't be able to do anything else afterwards.

The shorter the hi/lo intervals, the tougher. However the interval needs to be at least 10 seconds in order to properly tax ATP system for adaptation.

mark999
02-12-2010, 05:46 PM
instead of a treadmill, i use a cybex total body arc trainer at the gym. easier on the joints and much safer than treadmill. great for interval training.

crosscourt
02-16-2010, 11:52 AM
Two things I have been doing recently, courtesy of a trainer at the gym, that may be of interest. If nothing else they break the routine.

The first is to do intervals on the rowing machine and then run on the tread mill. I do 30 seconds fast and 30 seconds slow on the rowing machine for a period -- 15 mins, 25 mins - followed by a run -- 20 mins, 40 mins -- whatever. You can adjust the timings to your level of fitness and more importantly to your other commitments. This does seem to work.

Secondly, on the treadmill, run for five minutes, then for the next 2mins 30 secs increase the speed by 1mph ech 30 secs. So if you start at speed 10, you should be at speed 15 by the time you fnish. Then go back down to speed 11. After 5 mins ratchet it up again for 2mins 30 secs. So you will be at speed 16 when yufinish. Then go back down to 12 and run for 5 minutes and so on...

cc

35ft6
02-16-2010, 12:33 PM
I sort of think treadmills are the ideal way to HIIT, it's what I do, and it's nice to be able to program my treadmill to change speeds and keep timing. The downside is I'm afraid to go faster than 9.5. I'm sure my treadmill can handle it without slipping, but just kind of worried.

- 5 minute warmup. I walk 1/8th o a mile, than job at 5.5 until 5 minutes is up.
After that, it's basically 20 minutes of the following: 2 minutes of 5.7 mph for every one minute of 9.5 mph. So 3 minute cycles.

I actually have another one programmed at two 6.5 mph minutes for every 9.5 one also.

Since I started doing this, my cardio has really improved (and I was running 4 to 7 miles almost every day before), and I swear I feel my shorts getting tighter around my thighs even as I'm losing weight.

Tennis_Monk
02-16-2010, 06:33 PM
The definition of HIIT could be debatable. I also believe Treadmill is ideal for what i call HIIT.

Given that i have limited time to do this kind of training, i have landed on a routine that works well for me.

Basically i have a 20 minute run. What i vary is the intensity but i dont run more than 20 minutes (nor will i run less than 20 mts).

I start at 6.5 for 2 minutes, then alternate 9.5 and 7.5 for the next 8 minutes.Depending on how i feel on a given day, i may continue that until 18 minute mark and then cool off at 6.5. Some days after 10 minutes, i may coast a bit at 7.5 and then hit the 9 mark around 17 minutes and then cool off. The only parameter i have is to keep my speed at least 6.0 or above.

Was this effective ? I have been doing this kind of stuff for 5 months now and So far i had no chance to test myself out. All i know is on tennis courts, it takes a hell lot of time for me to warm up (unless i do a half mile sprint on tread mill and head to the court) and i dont remember getting tired.