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krizzle
02-12-2010, 04:51 PM
Hi, i'm almost exactly two weeks out from tennis season. More specifically, 11 days. I'm in pretty good physical form; I recently ran a 6:30 mile, and can run 2 miles at a 7:15ish pace. I think i'm strong in my arms. I can do 30 pushups easy, and they're pretty good form.
I go to the gym almost everyday, and here's what I do,approximately:
Day 1: Tues/Thurs
Arm conditioning (Flies, Biceps, Triceps, Deltoids, shoulder press things)
1.5 miles, twice, at 9:05
Tennis lesson, 5-6 PM
Day 2: Mon/Wed/Fri
Stomach/leg conditioning (Hamstrings, Quads, calves, the bodymaster thingy where I pull up my legs from an up/down position to horizontal, and one other ab machine)
Similar running, though a bit more.
Weekends:
Rest/ pickup soccer/ a set or two of tennis

What should I be doing for the next two weeks, to be in optimal shape for HS tennis?

T Woody
02-12-2010, 05:13 PM
2 weeks? The best things you can do are play a lot of tennis, get 8 or more hours of sleep a night, and eat a healthy diet.

LafayetteHitter
02-12-2010, 05:29 PM
What I would do is get prepared mentally to not be annoyed if an overweight kid beats you because he focused more on tennis.

robJAR
02-12-2010, 05:46 PM
I'm also conditioning for my college tennis team, and what i'm trying to do mainly is keept up the conditioning, eat healthy, and mentally prep myself for the upcoming season. Pretty much what everyone up there said.. I just read the other posts now haha.

-robJAR

charliefedererer
02-12-2010, 07:25 PM
Hi, i'm almost exactly two weeks out from tennis season. More specifically, 11 days. I'm in pretty good physical form; I recently ran a 6:30 mile, and can run 2 miles at a 7:15ish pace. I think i'm strong in my arms. I can do 30 pushups easy, and they're pretty good form.
I go to the gym almost everyday, and here's what I do,approximately:
Day 1: Tues/Thurs
Arm conditioning (Flies, Biceps, Triceps, Deltoids, shoulder press things)
1.5 miles, twice, at 9:05
Tennis lesson, 5-6 PM
Day 2: Mon/Wed/Fri
Stomach/leg conditioning (Hamstrings, Quads, calves, the bodymaster thingy where I pull up my legs from an up/down position to horizontal, and one other ab machine)
Similar running, though a bit more.
Weekends:
Rest/ pickup soccer/ a set or two of tennis

What should I be doing for the next two weeks, to be in optimal shape for HS tennis?

Congratulations. You've done the work, now enjoy your tennis season.

There are three suggestions:
1. Delete the long distance runs at moderate speeds and substitute High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) and agility drills. Tennis is a series of very short sprints, stops, starts and changing direction. Your long distance running was good for getting a cardiovascular fitness base, but to get tennis specific do sprints (or near sprints) for distances of 50-100 yards, followed by a rest of 3x the seconds it took to do the sprint, followed by another sprint. Keep it up until exhaustion. Some like to do this at a track where they sprint the straightaways and walk/jog the curves. Simple agility drills include skipping along the baseline, ladder drills and box drills. It's getting too short a time to make big strides for this season, but keep these in mind for over the summer and next season. http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/intervaltraining.html
http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/agility-exercises.html
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=182816
http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_437_269.pdf

2. Play as much tennis as possible in the next two weeks and do so with intensity. That is run hard to every shot out of your splitstep timed to when your opponent hits the ball. Use small steps as you approach the ball to be sure you are setting up in your optimal hitting zone. Recover quickly back to a neutral site on the baseline, or when appropriate, follow up a forcing shot with a sprint towards the net.

3. Take at least one day off before the tennis season starts if you have been training/playing extra hard so you will start that first practice fresh.

krizzle
02-12-2010, 10:07 PM
I know a drill that I did for soccer training, and it involves sprints on a track. It goes something like sprint 10 yards forward, jog 10 yards backwards, sprint 20 yards, jog 20 back, ... until 50, then a rest. After that, 10,20,30,40, then rest, then 10,20,30.
Is that a good drill?

charliefedererer
02-13-2010, 06:36 AM
I know a drill that I did for soccer training, and it involves sprints on a track. It goes something like sprint 10 yards forward, jog 10 yards backwards, sprint 20 yards, jog 20 back, ... until 50, then a rest. After that, 10,20,30,40, then rest, then 10,20,30.
Is that a good drill?

Not just good, great!

And it's great that you play soccer. The exercise there is much more like tennis with frequent starts and stops and changes in direction. You develop a tactile awareness of exactly where your feet are beneath you and how balance with you body weight as you make all those changes can mean the difference of being left flat footed or being able to shift on a dime to go for the ball or get to the correct position on the field to receive a pass or guard a defender. And you develop a tactile sense and dexterity with your feet that you won't get with any other sport. My toughest opponent is a very good soccer player, and I just can not catch him out of position or winded, and I can only marvel at how surely and quickly he takes those small adjustment steps as he gets ready to hit the ball, and how quickly he recovers for the next shot.

kiteboard
02-13-2010, 08:19 AM
Congratulations. You've done the work, now enjoy your tennis season.

There are three suggestions:
1. Delete the long distance runs at moderate speeds and substitute High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) and agility drills. Tennis is a series of very short sprints, stops, starts and changing direction. Your long distance running was good for getting a cardiovascular fitness base, but to get tennis specific do sprints (or near sprints) for distances of 50-100 yards, followed by a rest of 3x the seconds it took to do the sprint, followed by another sprint. Keep it up until exhaustion. Some like to do this at a track where they sprint the straightaways and walk/jog the curves. Simple agility drills include skipping along the baseline, ladder drills and box drills. It's getting too short a time to make big strides for this season, but keep these in mind for over the summer and next season. http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/intervaltraining.html
http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/agility-exercises.html
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=182816
http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_437_269.pdf

2. Play as much tennis as possible in the next two weeks and do so with intensity. That is run hard to every shot out of your splitstep timed to when your opponent hits the ball. Use small steps as you approach the ball to be sure you are setting up in your optimal hitting zone. Recover quickly back to a neutral site on the baseline, or when appropriate, follow up a forcing shot with a sprint towards the net.

3. Take at least one day off before the tennis season starts if you have been training/playing extra hard so you will start that first practice fresh.

High speed footwork drills work.. Listen to this guy.

Zachol82
02-13-2010, 09:31 AM
I would also recommend that if you're lifting weights, don't increase the load at all. You should focus on lifting weights to maintain your current strength; you DO NOT want to overwork your muscles to build more strength right now, there's not enough time and you'll tire your body out.

Healthy diet and 8-9 hours sleep a day, and try to sleep early. Believe it or not, sleeping from 10PM to 7AM and sleeping from 2AM to 11AM is different.

Also, during tennis season, I would recommend keeping your weights, during weight-lifting, the same as well. Unless you're not playing a match or something for an entire week. A general rule is just don't cause muscle soreness, or muscle fatigue, within 2-3 days of a match.

Conditioning is great, but once the season starts, the best thing to do is play more tennis. Pretty obvious right?

krizzle
02-15-2010, 08:42 PM
I need some diet ideas, if someone could help.
The only meal that I can't really control is dinner, but we do eat healthy enough- usually a salad or vegetable side dish, meat, and potatoes/rice/pasta.
I don't really eat much breakfast, something that hinders me at school; two slices of bread with cream cheese just isn't enough. How could I get all the healthy, filling stuff in while still being able to play for a half hour in the mornings?
What about lunch? Usually I make it myself, usually something simple, like a sandwich, but sometimes I don't eat (It's really bad, I know).
I need to eat more veggies (blech...) and fruits. I don't mind corn and carrots (fresh or steamed), tomatoes, but I don't like the healthy stuff: the leafy greens, the peppers, the brussels sprouts.
So, basically:
What are some foods for breakfast/lunch that are filling, not highly caloric, and I can play tennis right after consuming?
What are some ways that you eat/ dull the taste of such veggies?

Pink_Shirt
02-16-2010, 08:43 AM
I'm curious with this as well, answers have been great so far.

athiker
02-16-2010, 11:12 AM
Breakfast: Oatmeal is quick and healthy to make...great fiber. Keep a bag of frozen blueberries or mixed berries in the freezer and toss some in. Add milk for a bit of protein. To goose the protein you need if you are working out add an egg to grab after eating the oatmeal. Hard boil 7 eggs for the week and keep in a carton in the fridge. Grab an egg, banana and a Cutie as you head out the door if you don't have time or inclination to make Oatmeal. Ever heard of Cuties? They are small and easy to peel kind of like tangerines...easy to grab as you go out the door. Sweet and my kids love them. You can even toss few in your book bag for snacks. Vitamin C but more fiber than drinking OJ. Oh, and get the regular oatmeal, not the sugared up individual prepackaged kind.

Another good snack is the Larabar Cherry bar. It has only 3 ingredients: dates, almonds and unsweetened cherries. I wouldn't necessarily recommend them as a lunch substitute, but they are portable and better than skipping (see Amazon.com...I get regular deliveries). Anything with some nuts and/or seeds, is portable and will give you some good energy that will last a while and is not all simple carbs. The Larabar doesn't have a ton of protein, but has some at least in addition to fat and carbs. GORP in baggies...Good Ole Raisins and Peanuts!...you can even toss in a few M&Ms but go easy on them. I think in general you want a mix of Carbs, good fats and proteins in any meal you choose. Almonds are kind of expensive but tasty and good for you.

Dinner: One simple guide for eating is to have multiple colors in your meal. The more the better. All brown and white is not that great! You mention you don't mind carrots...probably b/c they are sweet (corn btw barely qualifies as a veggie :) ). I would say 5 nights out of 7 my kids have the same veggies. We serve raw baby carrots and raw broccoli florets. One dips them in ketchup and the other two dip them in either a ranch type dressing or a poppy seed dressing. Yes those dressings are high calorie, but they don't have a problem burning calories. For them its more important to get some leafy green veggies in them. They also like raw spinach leaves. We hardly ever cook veggies anymore (except asparagus and succotash) b/c they prefer them raw. When we have spaghetti we chop up raw spinach and put it in the red sauce...you don't even notice it is in there. Plus raw veggies are fast!

Some people who don't care for a lot of veggies like raw red or yellow pepper strips either with or without a dip. They are much sweeter than green peppers, but can be pricey as well. Finally, celery and peanut butter or since you mentioned cream cheese...celery filled with cream cheese and topped with raisins might be a good snack/lunch/breakfast item for you. Add a re-freezable ice pack to your lunch.

Magazines like Men's Health (admit I haven't read it in years) and Outside and even Backpacker seem to have regular articles on quick, portable and healthy meal ideas and substitutes for active people. Search their online editions. But specifically re: your breakfast "just isn't enough" add a hard boiled egg for staying power and a fruit for fiber, vitamin C and other good stuff. Everything I read agrees that skimping on breakfast equals crashing and eating empty calories later (not to mention actually adding unwanted fat weight). Good luck...I kind of rushed through so maybe a bit jumbled.

EDIT: Btw...yes eggs have cholesterol, but they also have a lot of other good stuff in them. If you are preparing them hard boiled and not in butter/grease, eating oatmeal and are an active person I don't think an egg per day is a big deal. YMMV.

frequenicity
02-17-2010, 06:27 AM
Just a "sports-in-general" tip...but instead of focusing on separate groups of muscles, focus on doing more core-focused full-body workouts...including some plyometrics. Since you aren't trying to bulk up (especially this close to the season), then doing exercises that bring in multiple muscle groups and have core focus should really help you get into athletic shape.

And I also agree fully about doing high intensity interval training instead of the longer distance runs. Do 50 yard dashes in reps just like you would any other exercise, then increase the yardage.

krizzle
02-17-2010, 09:00 PM
Should I be doing moderate training on the rowing machine? The diagrams show that it works basically everything. And are biceps and triceps used as much as the forearm?

frequenicity
02-18-2010, 07:45 AM
Should I be doing moderate training on the rowing machine? The diagrams show that it works basically everything. And are biceps and triceps used as much as the forearm?

Personally I try to avoid using machines as much as possible. How old are you? If you are at a developed enough age, then using free weights shouldn't be an issue. Just remember to back off on the overall amount of weight you are lifting.

The reason I would recommend going away from machines is that while machines can help you with form and the target muscle groups, they do not allow for your smaller stabilization muscles to work as well.

Most arm exercises that target biceps/triceps also will help with forarm/grip.

One good upper body/core exercise that I find very helpful is a one-arm dumbbell bench press. Use dumbbells, push both up in the air like a normal bench press, then slowly bring one down then back up, then the other in an alternating pattern. Helps with great stabilization throughout the chest, shoulders, arms, and core.

yellowoctopus
02-19-2010, 03:21 AM
2 weeks? The best things you can do are play a lot of tennis, get 8 or more hours of sleep a night, and eat a healthy diet.

This makes a lot of sense, really.

To the OP: I would take T_Woody's advice and actually reverse the ratio of time you spend in the gym and on the tennis court, i.e. lots more tennis.

I would also like to add that you should add stretching routine (serious stretching, not the stuff you do before and after your exercises) to your plan. This is often needed during teenage years because your muscle is growing fast and flexibility usually decreases along with the rapid growth.

Yoga works well for me because it also works on my breathing and focus (staying in it).

charliefedererer
02-19-2010, 05:57 AM
Should I be doing moderate training on the rowing machine? The diagrams show that it works basically everything. And are biceps and triceps used as much as the forearm?

A little bit of rowing is probably a good thing for tennis players. The arm pulling towards you acton is almost exactly the opposite of the throwing away motion of groundstrokes and serves, and exactly opposite the "usual" main upper extremity/back strengthening exercise, the bench press. Thus like the bent over (prone) dumbell row of the "thrower's ten", it helps to strenthen the stabilizing muscles of the shoulder and upper back. Plus, it obviously works the legs, and you should feel it in your central abdominal muscle as well. But rowing does not do as good a job in any of these areas as the bent over row, twisting sit ups on a slant board, and squats. So although I usually end my workout with some rowing as a cool down exercise, it shouldn't serve a substitute for your other exercises.