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johnnyboy82
02-14-2010, 10:22 AM
How much should I sell a TAD Davis Antique Raquet for?
I have had this Raquet for a while and I would like to sell it. I almost just gave it away to a thrift store until a friend told me that I could sell it on **** for ALOT. It also has the protector bracket with it. It is in good condition and on the tip of raquet it has minor small scrapes from just being moved around and also the grip has minor little cut-ins from being ran into stuff I beleive. So my question is, How much is a TAD Davis raquet worth? My friend told me to place it for $85 or more since its antique! Can someone help me out?

Virginia
02-14-2010, 10:43 AM
$85 is way over the top. Most TAD's start life at between $10 and $20. You may get more, depending on timing and the way you present your listing.

Nothing to stop you trying for the higher price though - you might get lucky. Occasionally I see Davis racquets with a high starting price - but rarely do they get sold, from what I've seen.

VGP
02-14-2010, 10:55 AM
Depends on the model. But not by much. IMO, I love the look of the TAD Imperial.

khw72004
03-05-2010, 01:33 PM
TAD Imperial are very nice. I am not a wood fan, but I have acquired a few in the past. The raised ink of the design make the Imperial one my my favorite TAD's. I recently traded a 9/10 TAD Imperial for a mere 35 credit.

coachrick
03-05-2010, 03:36 PM
I think the term you are looking for is 'vintage'...most collectors would agree that no TADavis racket qualifies as 'antique'...collectible, perhaps; vintage certainly, but not 'antique'.(UNLESS one uses the questionable 50-year old benchmark to 'define' "antique"--that would mean a Davis racket made pre-1960...certainly collectible, IMO) I agree that it would depend on the model...rarity or personal interest would possibly drive the price.

It's rather laughable to see some of the Davis Hi-Point rackets on the bay and elsewhere with high prices. The Hi-Point was by far the weakest link in the Davis chain...a twenty-dollar frame at best...like seeing a Bancroft Aussie at a high price.

I also get a kick out of the racket listings calling a racket 'press' or 'brace' a "stretcher". I bet I saw three different listings today using that term. A little scary to think you could 'stretch' a wood racket! :)

play4.5
09-12-2010, 10:08 AM
Hello,
As with any vintage collectible, condition and demand is important. Warping or cracks place value near ZERO of course, I agree.
Racquet collecting has become like collecting rare coins to many enthusiasts. As the trend grows, so will the value of new and excellent condition racquets.
Smart investors know the Classic line are SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL wood racquets with lamination that prevents warping. Most other woods can't say that. They will warp easily.
TADs can be more beautiful than fine furniture and the attention to detail is second to none. I own and occasionally sell them if the price is right. I'm not in a hurry.
As a buyer and a seller I think rarity and condition are the most important things. Look at the head end. Is it heavily used? Sellers of these fine items will do well to photograph them professionally, show any flaws especially on the head end, and accept reasonable offers. Good luck.

Fearsome Forehand
09-12-2010, 11:41 AM
Hey racquet people. I'd like to jump in here and say whoa.
These previous 5 posts are now off base. :oops:TAD DAVIS racquets in nice condition have emerged as a sought after collector's item commanding sigificant value.
These posts may have been current last year. But the beautiful Davis Vintage racquets have come into their own. There is an international demand to find these sticks of yester-year. Collectors have picked up on the wave and drained the market of nice condition or near new models--at almost any price...
As with any vintage collectible, condition and demand is important. Warping or cracks place value near ZERO of course, I agree. I'm not talking about them. Maybe the other posters are. Maybe that's what they tried to sell or something. Naturally a heavily used Davis would be a dime a dozen considering there used to be about 3,000 Tad Davis sales outlets in 1975.
But clean strung units in fine condition with satisfactory decals are now in high demand. Many are selling for more than great new racquets at auction and buy it now on line.
The increase in DEMAND FOR TAD DAVIS has created a fast BIG noticeable trend and the growing scarcity of nice condition nearly new TAD DAVIS RACQUETS OF ALL TYPES has sent prices far ahead of previous levels.
I can factually state Davis Classic I, II, III tennis racquets are selling for $90 or more at online auction if you can find one. The Tad Davis Lady Elite in excellend condition just sold for $120.00 to an auction buyer from Spain, I saw. Smart investors know the Classic line are SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL wood racquets with lamination that prevents warping. Most other woodies can't say that.
They are more beautiful than fine furniture and the attention to detail is second to none for the time. I own some and enjoy using them on court as well with modern strings and dampeners. If stored indoors these have retained much of their original color and beauty.
Extremely rare mid-size composites released by TAD DAVIS for a short period in the 80s have been selling for more than $180.00! Now that's "over the top". Beautiful rare items like the Boron 150 or DGF-10 midsizers are now sought by those in the know for over $200. The last wood racquet Tad Davis made--the fiber-glass composite TAD DAVIS TOPSPIN--features unique diagonal stringing--and sells for as much as $125-150.00 in new condition with new strings. If you've ever used one, you know why. Only a few people even have them for sale. The nearly impossible to find "full face" TOPSPIN is even more.
Granted the original High Point model was low end and mass produced and it's worth very little. I'll give you that. But the pro racquets, from the Professional, both white and black, Imperial, Imperial Deluxe (long regarded as the most beautiful racquet made), Tad Supreme, etc. are a tough find anymore. Just try. I hope the writers of the previous posts understand this is a changing market and their statements are truly not up to date in this rapidly changing time. Just try to buy. Thanks. N



At least there is no excessive hype in the above post. :)

There is a seller on the auction site who evidently stumbled on to a cache of old Victor TAD stock in the Chicago area (where Victor Sports was HQ'ed until they went out of business in the 1980's) that has been trying to sell new old stock TAD Topspins for a while now for what I would consider to be outlandishly high prices. He started off asking around $200 and slowly he is working his way down to reality. (I think he sold like 2 or 3 in a year (via best offers) for around $80/each.) Same guy has been trying to get $200+ for a used Davis graphite. (Good luck with that.) He also wants to sell 30 year old syn gut string and leather grips at a premium. Go figure.

Used Davis wood rackets are a dime a dozen. They typically sell (when they actually sell) in the $20 or less range. More than $30 is very unusual. (A used one is decent condition just sold for the princely sum of $0.99) I have seen new old stock Davis woodies languish unsold on the auction site for months even at rather reasonable/low prices.

A serious collector of Davis rackets would be willing to pay more for a brand new, never used one but that is probably true
of any name brand collectible racket.

Rarity is great and all. But, rarity doesn't necessarily correlate with demand. I have a lot of rackets that are very rare, but there is little demand for them so they aren't worth much (except perhaps to a rabid collector.) Now, if I had a closet full of unused Pro Staff St.V's, or Dunlop 200G's, or Lendl GTX's another matter entirely.

Despite the TAD glowing prospectus above, Davis rackets are probably not the best place to invest your hard fought dollars in your are seeking significant financial gains. There are only a handful of rackets that are investment grade. :)

joe sch
09-12-2010, 12:03 PM
I think the term you are looking for is 'vintage'...most collectors would agree that no TADavis racket qualifies as 'antique'...collectible, perhaps; vintage certainly, but not 'antique'.(UNLESS one uses the questionable 50-year old benchmark to 'define' "antique"--that would mean a Davis racket made pre-1960...certainly collectible, IMO) I agree that it would depend on the model...rarity or personal interest would possibly drive the price.

It's rather laughable to see some of the Davis Hi-Point rackets on the bay and elsewhere with high prices. The Hi-Point was by far the weakest link in the Davis chain...a twenty-dollar frame at best...like seeing a Bancroft Aussie at a high price.

I also get a kick out of the racket listings calling a racket 'press' or 'brace' a "stretcher". I bet I saw three different listings today using that term. A little scary to think you could 'stretch' a wood racket! :)

Coach is right on like usual. The term antique is very often misused, it is actually suppose to be used for an item that is 100+ years old. Also, as he points out, the hipoint was bottom of the line and much lower quality than all the other TAD rackets. You can find many for sale every week for $5..10 in excellent condition.

racquetfreak
09-12-2010, 02:37 PM
some "recent -60s/70s" TADs, such as a nice classic III, could fetch a better price, but most would not unless in new/mint condition. the early 1930/40s TADs are quite rare and could be considered valuable if in decent condition.

J011yroger
09-12-2010, 02:47 PM
I have a few, I think the most I ever paid was $7.50, the other two were $5.

J

J011yroger
09-12-2010, 02:48 PM
I will say that my TAD Lady Elite is the nicest looking racquet I own.

J

Fearsome Forehand
09-12-2010, 04:13 PM
I will say that my TAD Lady Elite is the nicest looking racquet I own.

J

I would find it rather difficult to maintain my usual ultra macho on court persona whilst swinging a racket called a Lady Elite. :)

J011yroger
09-12-2010, 06:50 PM
I would find it rather difficult to maintain my usual ultra macho on court persona whilst swinging a racket called a Lady Elite. :)

I did put down 121mph with a wooden racquet, so I think my baller status wouldn't be challenged.

Unless perhaps I was wearing something from the Maria Sharapova line... :oops:

J

Hall of Fame Racquets
09-15-2010, 11:15 PM
Hey racquet people. I'd like to jump in here and say whoa.
These previous 5 posts are now off base. :oops:TAD DAVIS racquets in nice condition have emerged as a sought after collector's item commanding sigificant value.
These posts may have been current last year. But the beautiful Davis Vintage racquets have come into their own. There is an international demand to find these sticks of yester-year. Collectors have picked up on the wave and drained the market of nice condition or near new models--at almost any price...
As with any vintage collectible, condition and demand is important. Warping or cracks place value near ZERO of course, I agree. I'm not talking about them. Maybe the other posters are. Maybe that's what they tried to sell or something. Naturally a heavily used Davis would be a dime a dozen considering there used to be about 3,000 Tad Davis sales outlets in 1975.
But clean strung units in fine condition with satisfactory decals are now in high demand. Many are selling for more than great new racquets at auction and buy it now on line.
The increase in DEMAND FOR TAD DAVIS has created a fast BIG noticeable trend and the growing scarcity of nice condition nearly new TAD DAVIS RACQUETS OF ALL TYPES has sent prices far ahead of previous levels.
I can factually state Davis Classic I, II, III tennis racquets are selling for $90 or more at online auction if you can find one. The Tad Davis Lady Elite in excellend condition just sold for $120.00 to an auction buyer from Spain, I saw. Smart investors know the Classic line are SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL wood racquets with lamination that prevents warping. Most other woodies can't say that.
They are more beautiful than fine furniture and the attention to detail is second to none for the time. I own some and enjoy using them on court as well with modern strings and dampeners. If stored indoors these have retained much of their original color and beauty.
Extremely rare mid-size composites released by TAD DAVIS for a short period in the 80s have been selling for more than $180.00! Now that's "over the top". Beautiful rare items like the Boron 150 or DGF-10 midsizers are now sought by those in the know for over $200. The last wood racquet Tad Davis made--the fiber-glass composite TAD DAVIS TOPSPIN--features unique diagonal stringing--and sells for as much as $125-150.00 in new condition with new strings. If you've ever used one, you know why. Only a few people even have them for sale. The nearly impossible to find "full face" TOPSPIN is even more.
Granted the original High Point model was low end and mass produced and it's worth very little. I'll give you that. But the pro racquets, from the Professional, both white and black, Imperial, Imperial Deluxe (long regarded as the most beautiful racquet made), Tad Supreme, etc. are a tough find anymore. Just try. I hope the writers of the previous posts understand this is a changing market and their statements are truly not up to date in this rapidly changing time. Just try to buy. Thanks. N

I really appreciate your post as I now have over 100 Davis racquets in the Tennis Racquet Hall of Fame which I have developed over the last twelve years. http://photobucket.com/alamocrest

I have many collecting areas that are meaningful to me and discovering the many variations of Davis racquets as very stimulating. I am not talking about the many used level racquets but the many variations of near mint Professionals, Hi-Points, Jets, Blackstreaks, Silverstreaks, Dukes, Cornets, Tads, Holidays, Imperials, Classics, etc. The extensive variety in the various Davis models creates very interesting display possibilities.

I believe that after the quantity of used Davis racquets diminish that in ten years a Davis Collection will continue to be among the most popular wood presentations world wide collectors will pursue with increasing intensity.

jimbo333
09-16-2010, 08:10 AM
That bloke banging on about the Topspins, is obviously selling them though!

The Davis racquets that I've seen do look amazing I must say, but for some reason I'm not a fan, don't know why? The racquets look great, I guess I just don't like the brand, as I say I can't explain it.

lazya4
09-16-2010, 03:31 PM
here is a cool link about davis rackets
http://www.thewoody.net/webpages/racquets/tadavisreview.html

Fearsome Forehand
09-22-2010, 11:04 PM
Victor Sports/TAD Davis' former headquarters:

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=5115+s+millard+ave+chicago+il&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=5115+S+Millard+Ave,+Chicago,+IL+60632&gl=us&ei=_-qaTO6dKo34swOE1pWQBA&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CBMQ8gEwAA

Currently home to an outfit called Melon Source. I'm assuming they dabble in fruit, or implants. :)

Kemitak
09-23-2010, 08:42 AM
Maybe it's where Gallagher gets his watermelons.

mrw
09-24-2010, 12:22 PM
given that my 401K is in the crapper, it's good to know that my collection of Davis racquets will ensure a comfortable retirement.:lol::lol:

Don T.
09-24-2010, 04:46 PM
Speaking of TAD sticks...does anyone remember the TAD Davis Esprit(100% Graphite)? To me, one of the most beautiful frames...gloss black with silver and red pin stripes...has a classy looking TAD emblem on the throat.

Virginia
09-24-2010, 06:50 PM
Yes, it is pretty nice - I have one actually - must have a hit with it sometime. :)

Don T.
09-24-2010, 07:38 PM
I also have one...but for some reason I can't bring myself to hit with it. It has never been strung, has plastic on the grip and came with a set of blue swirly Victor strings, cover...and even some tournament brackets labeled "Davis" Racquets...I honestly can't remember where I got em!

Fearsome Forehand
10-03-2010, 03:02 PM
That bloke banging on about the Topspins, is obviously selling them though!

The Davis racquets that I've seen do look amazing I must say, but for some reason I'm not a fan, don't know why? The racquets look great, I guess I just don't like the brand, as I say I can't explain it.

My guess is that it is the same guy who is trying to sell Topspins on the auction site for $100+ trying to drum up some business by posting here.

He is allowed to charge whatever he wants but if he is interested in selling some, he will have to ask a lot less for them.

I noticed a new old stock TAD Topspin recently sold at auction for $25 on fleabay. So much for post #6.

Virginia
10-03-2010, 09:20 PM
^^ quoted for truth.

Fearsome Forehand
10-11-2010, 05:55 PM
Speaking of TAD sticks...does anyone remember the TAD Davis Esprit(100% Graphite)? To me, one of the most beautiful frames...gloss black with silver and red pin stripes...has a classy looking TAD emblem on the throat.

The Esprit is probably the best graphite frame TAD Davis ever made IMHO. (Although I know people who think the firmer Boron 150 is TAD's best graphite. A matter of taste as both are good rackets.) The Esprit is a really nice mid size (90?), great flex but not a wet noodle. I have a couple of Esprits that I play with occasionally and I really enjoy hitting with them. Great serve and volley players rackets. No nonsense. Nice heft and a lot to like if you enjoy old school frames.

Not sure exactly why Davis went out of business (mid 1980's?). I suppose like a lot of racket companies, they didn't manage the transition from wood to graphite particularly well and to some degree were driven out of the business by the dominance of the big boys; Wilson, Dunlop, Head and Prince. Not too many niche players seem to survive very long in the racket biz.

play4.5
12-28-2010, 12:10 AM
Thank you all for responding and reading about the great TAD DAVIS tennis racquets.
I want to say I appreciate and echo user name racquet hall of fame's comments.
Sincerely, play4.5

Virginia
12-29-2010, 10:36 AM
For what it's worth, I've specialised in Davis racquets for my own collection and own approximately 35, all in very good condition, some as new and a few rare pieces too. Thus you could say that I'm an avid Davis fan - I do agree they are beautifully designed and crafted. I have a copy of one of the original patents.

It's not true to say that "thousands" have read this thread - "thousands" relates to page views and most people reread a thread that has new responses.

In this forum, we're all classic lovers, so we read pretty much every thread when someone makes a fresh comment.

I don't doubt that some of your offerings are indeed rare models and it does seem that you have managed to source any remaining "new old stock" frames (possibly all of them), no doubt at prices that allow you to make a good profit, if you can onsell them.

I know of one or two products that you didn't manage to snare and I have a few myself. Beautiful leather grips for example (both designs) and I also have a tin of new Victor strings, containing 36 sets of the lovely blue spiral.

I do believe your racquets are over-priced, but of course you're entitled to charge whatever you wish. If the prices put off someone like me, a serious Davis collector, even if on a relatively small scale, you may find limited interest in your offerings.

coachrick
12-29-2010, 01:07 PM
For what it's worth, I've specialised in Davis racquets for my own collection and own approximately 35, all in very good condition, some as new and a few rare pieces too. Thus you could say that I'm an avid Davis fan - I do agree they are beautifully designed and crafted. I have a copy of one of the original patents.

It's not true to say that "thousands" have read this thread - "thousands" relates to page views and most people reread a thread that has new responses.

In this forum, we're all classic lovers, so we read pretty much every thread when someone makes a fresh comment.

I don't doubt that some of your offerings are indeed rare models and it does seem that you have managed to source any remaining "new old stock" frames (possibly all of them), no doubt at prices that allow you to make a good profit, if you can onsell them.

I know of one or two products that you didn't manage to snare and I have a few myself. Beautiful leather grips for example (both designs) and I also have a tin of new Victor strings, containing 36 sets of the lovely blue spiral.

I do believe your racquets are over-priced, but of course you're entitled to charge whatever you wish. If the prices put off someone like me, a serious Davis collector, even if on a relatively small scale, you may find limited interest in your offerings.

A more 'eloquent' response than the one I was considering :) . +1