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Rabbit
02-23-2010, 05:24 AM
I finally got one. Not only did I get one, but I got one that still had the cardboard cover over the frame and inside the cardboard cover is a 4 page warranty book. It's never been strung.

The Superform was always my idea of the coolest frame ever. Mine came in yesterday and I am just plain tickled. I still remember watching Frew McMillan play with this frame and hit unbelievable angled volleys playing doubles. The frame itself is just awesome. It is amazing that he played with it at that level, the head of this frame appears to be smaller than a wood racquet.

I bought it from woodtennis.com and the seller and transaction were great. I highly recommend dealing with joe sch. Just a great deal all the way around.

I'll post pictures later if there's any interest.

vsbabolat
02-23-2010, 07:37 AM
Congrats! I am interested in seeing some pics.:)

coachrick
02-23-2010, 09:46 AM
Couple of SuperForm stories, if I may:
Tied for first place in a YAMAHA Fast Serve Contest using an original Superform! Yamaha rep was not too happy since the other two fastest servers used a T3000 and a WOOD Jack Kramer DEMO!!! Yamaha did get some good feedback since the contest was held to feature the YFG series of rackets and many folks improved their serve speed using the supplied powerhouse YFG 30 and 50 sticks.

Story #2:
As the resident 'hot-dog' managing the finest tennis shop in the area, I showed up for a mixed doubles tournament wearing the latest wildly colored Fila, Head or Tacchini outfits carrying my two stenciled Superforms(RED ink, of course). I had never met my mid-teenaged partner who arrived wearing white shorts, white crew-neck shirt and Kramer wood rackets. The first live ball she witnessed from me was a drop-shot service return that went over her shoulder, landed in the alley and nearly jumped back across the net! :) All she could do was shake her head!! Let me add that this young lady DID NOT DOUBLE FAULT and DID NOT MISS A SERVICE RETURN in three, three-set matches! So much for my hot-dogginess!

Fischer had the most elegant Vibra-Stop(first I had seen as a stock item in a racket) in that Superform and we sold dozens of them as folks discovered what they did for the sound and vibration in the rackets of the '70s. Solid, integral, one-piece handles on the SuperForm as I recall...ultimate feedback!

I'd like to get my hands on one(for a reasonable price or trade :) ), just to bring back the memories(I might need to start lifting weights first!). :)

Virginia
02-23-2010, 10:33 AM
I got one recently too - never played - it's just marginally warped, which is why I got it for a very good price. Beautiful!

Colpo
02-23-2010, 11:19 AM
Oh you all are referring to the ORIGINAL Superform - that's just nuts! Yes, to the naked eye certainly did appear to be a smaller stringbed than a standard wood frame. Will admit was intrigued by Fischer's more accessible broadening of the Superform shape in the early to mid 80s, most notably in the blue/red XL, silver Stan Smith XL, and the red President OS. I have several Centron MPs from the mid-90s that also, vaguely, recall that Superform diamond head shape, but with an open throat. But I'd love a pair of new Presidents, for sure.

retrowagen
02-23-2010, 12:39 PM
I remember thinking that those monoshaft Fischers were ideal for Frew McMillen's game, as he had a two-handed backhand AND forehand, and could grip that Superform like a baseball bat... :lol:

My favorite is the silver / red / blue "Stan Smith" Superform (or Superform XL), the mid recalled by Colpo above and used on tour by Stan the Man and also Anders Jarryd and Jonas B. Svensson. Also Jo Durie. That was THE pro-level Fischer for a few years, before their very first open-throat composite models were introduced in 1986.

joe sch
02-23-2010, 06:31 PM
Here is the racket that Rabbit is posting about:

http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5a.jpg
http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5c.jpg
http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5d.jpg

There are other similar models especially the other black version that has the Stan Smith colored decals on it, and the silver and black models. Rabbit, looking forward to your playing experiences and how you string it up.

Don T.
02-23-2010, 06:50 PM
Hey there Rabbit...Joe sch, long time no post for me...here's a couple pics of my Fischers...Don

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f325/tokaiboy/2Fischer.jpg

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f325/tokaiboy/2FischerThroat.jpg

Rabbit
02-24-2010, 08:20 AM
Here is the racket that Rabbit is posting about:

http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5a.jpg
http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5c.jpg
http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5d.jpg

There are other similar models especially the other black version that has the Stan Smith colored decals on it, and the silver and black models. Rabbit, looking forward to your playing experiences and how you string it up.


Joe..... :) ..... do you have another one that is already strung and is playable? I'd rather not string this one as it's just so perfect. :)

joe sch
02-25-2010, 05:25 PM
Joe..... :) ..... do you have another one that is already strung and is playable? I'd rather not string this one as it's just so perfect. :)

Rabbit, I will check, I know I have the black stan smith model that has some diff cosmetics that is strung and in excellent playing condition. Don T may also give you a deal on one of those nice brown models.

BTW, Don T... great to see you back here posting racket pictures !

Joe

Rabbit
02-26-2010, 06:35 AM
Really nice pics.

I have a Stan Smith. But, I believe I just scored another original SF on the bay. This one is new stock as well, only already strung.

Captain Haddock
02-26-2010, 08:02 AM
The Superform Open Pro was the coolest IMO. Not a monoshaft, but it had the typical Fischer tapered beam and head shape in beautiful red cosmetics:

http://www.80s-tennis.com/pages/fischer-superform-open-pro-2.html

I'd love to get a pair of those :-)

Colpo
03-01-2010, 12:24 PM
The Superform Open Pro was the coolest IMO. Not a monoshaft, but it had the typical Fischer tapered beam and head shape in beautiful red cosmetics:

http://www.80s-tennis.com/pages/fischer-superform-open-pro-2.html

I'd love to get a pair of those :-)

Had one once with original leather in a 3/8 - everything you think it would be. Great heft, balance, and feel. The candy-apple red paint was astounding. Harbinger of eventual Vac Pro 90, and was also used by Jarryd in competition circa 1988.

proracketeer
03-17-2010, 12:52 PM
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll303/proracketeer/100_0795.jpg
http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll303/proracketeer/100_0796.jpg

Rabbit
03-17-2010, 01:13 PM
Well I went and hit with the 4 1/2 strung one the other day. That thing is a beast. Backhands were pretty easy, forehands....not so much. The head on this thing is tiny, even compared to wood. It goes dang near a pound and swings like it, evenly balanced. Volleys were a struggle as well. Good thing that it looks great....

goldenyama
03-17-2010, 07:01 PM
The Superform Open Pro was the coolest IMO. Not a monoshaft, but it had the typical Fischer tapered beam and head shape in beautiful red cosmetics:

http://www.80s-tennis.com/pages/fischer-superform-open-pro-2.html

I'd love to get a pair of those :-)

Arrrgghh!! Beautiful. Makes me wish I wasn't a baseline basher who plays best with 102+ sq inch frames - I would love to have a pair of those to play with just so I could look at them in my hand...

Colpo
03-18-2010, 08:41 AM
Well I went and hit with the 4 1/2 strung one the other day. That thing is a beast. Backhands were pretty easy, forehands....not so much. The head on this thing is tiny, even compared to wood. It goes dang near a pound and swings like it, evenly balanced. Volleys were a struggle as well. Good thing that it looks great....

So vivid! I love it..."goes dang near a pound..." I can absolutely imagine that that's exactly the case -- absolute behemoth. Back then you could certainly have added to its cudgel-like feel, assuming big enough hands, and ordered it in the "Medium" weight in a "6" grip size (4 3/4). We've gotten so soft these days!

coachrick
03-19-2010, 08:58 AM
So I hit yesterday with my 'new' SuperForm Mid, YY8500 and Rawlings TieBreaker. The YY has the 'newest' string job(1995) and brings back memories. The TieBreaker needs new strings and feels like a club compared to the other two.

The SuperForm feels great and has that wonderful 'thock' on impact. It has some slick black strings(look to be original) and may benefit greatly from a fresh multi or nat gut. I don't know about the 'mid' part of this thing...it is LITTLE! Narrower than the TieBreaker with just a slightly deeper throat; BUT, IF you hit the middle, it feels like butta!!!

jimbo333
03-22-2010, 02:26 PM
Well this isn't really a Superform, but it is the same shape:)

http://i43.tinypic.com/1or8md.jpg

It is actually a Kingsize Compound!

A large wood racquet with graphite reinforcement, very odd racquet, I like it:)

coachrick
03-22-2010, 04:48 PM
Well this isn't really a Superform, but it is the same shape:)

http://i43.tinypic.com/1or8md.jpg

It is actually a Kingsize Compound!

A large wood racquet with graphite reinforcement, very odd racquet, I like it:)

I wonder how "Kingsize Compound" translates to Austrian. Reminiscent of the "Dreadnought Driver"...who could resist such an alluring name?!?

How's come you Euros got all the fun Fischers? I haven't seen most of these posted! Show a Yank a little love!

proracketeer
05-21-2010, 12:38 AM
I'd rather string this one. ;)

Tension?

http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5c.jpg

Tension?

coachrick
05-21-2010, 08:53 AM
Tension?

http://woodtennis.com/fischer/newfischersuperform5c.jpg

Tension?

I'd probably go with something along the lines of 17ga X-1 @ 50-52#. I believe mine has the original strings and still hits OK. I might restring just for grins. If I were going to use it more, I would try nat gut @ 52#.

Sanglier
08-28-2012, 11:55 PM
Found a dirt cheap Serrano over the weekend and was eager to play with it again after my last encounter with one some 25 years ago.

I've been wanting to experiment with a spaghetti job, and this is just the extra incentive I needed to get going. After scrubbing and greasing the old machine, and testing it first with a conventional job on a slightly lopsided "bumble bee" (which stretched the limit of the old horse in the absence of that update kit), I pulled out this scruffy Superform (which had been patiently waiting for this moment for the past 15 years) to begin my experiment. After all, it is already a "Fischer". :)

According to this article (http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/~cross/SPAGHETTI%20STRUNG%20RACQUETS.htm), the spaghetti job works by allowing the mains to move freely, and in unison. The originals were double-strung because they had two duplicate layers of mains sandwiching one layer of crosses. Each of the crosses is also double-strung to add strength (since there are fewer of them) and to circumvent premature wear.

I would have to see some ultra-slow-mo videos of the ball impacting the strings to be fully convinced that the increased spin of the spaghetti job was due to the mains moving in unison. However, the design was clearly based on these principles, and the results have never been in doubt. What I am less certain about is that this effect can only be achieved through double-stringing.

The grommet holes on the Superform are positively enormous, and lend themselves rather conveniently to double-stringing. However, the idea that I have been wanting to test is that I should be able to replicate the spaghetti effects using only single strings - namely by alternating the mains on the two sides of the cross sandwich (rather than having them sit back-to-back as on the originals), and by spreading the crosses over two adjacent holes instead of sharing a single one. The relatively dense string pattern of the Superform seems reasonably amenable to this conversion. After many hours of tedium, this is what came out in the end:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v15/sanglier/BeforeAfterSm.jpg


I probably got a little carried away with the fishing line ties, but since having the mains moving in unison is such a critical part of the design, I wanted to make sure that there is no give in these connections, and that the knots and tubing do not move during use. The originals relied on beads formed out of some type of epoxy to keep the tubing in place; I don't have any epoxy that wouldn't pop off on impact with a ball, so I relied on the fishing line knots themselves (soaked in superglue) to play that role. And yes, the whole ghastly thing does move in unison, and has stayed put after 30 min of test hitting:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v15/sanglier/FischerSpaghettiSm.jpg


Before I tied the mains together with the fishing lines, the racquet felt like a barbed wire trampoline and was totally unplayable. Once the grid is formed, it actually felt SURPRISINGLY solid and predictable on contact. If I hit the ball clean, the spin is very good, but I don't know if this is due to the mains moving in unison or because I am now hitting the ball with all these ridges and valleys and pebbles and divots:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v15/sanglier/FaceView2Sm.jpg


Anyhow, having never played with a real spaghetti, my frame of reference is very limited, but based on this little experiment, I would submit that it is not necessary to double-string a racquet to produce the spaghetti effect. I would also hazard a guess that Werner Fischer had already created something like this while refining his ideas, before ultimately settling on the double-strung design. In order to understand why he did that, I will have to wait for another Superform to show up at my local Goodwill, so that I can string it the proper Vilsbiburger way and do a side by side comparison (preferably with a third racquet strung conventionally as a control), because this one here is never going to be restrung again by me.

Sanglier
08-30-2012, 08:15 PM
Judging by the lack of interest in my post, I am guessing that this is all old news to those who are in the know, and I am just three decades late to the party (as usual). Nevertheless, I remained curious enough about this ill-fated technological innovation to have continued my exploration for the last couple of days.

Inspired by what Cross and Lindsey did here (http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/spinexperiment.php), I set up a rudimentary version of their videography rig and taped some sequences of the strings reacting to angular ball impact. I have the same camera that they used, so I chose to film the sequences at 600 frames per second as well. This is what my hybrid spaghetti job looked like on impact with a ball traveling at about 12-15 m/s at a roughly 45 degree angle (as I am throwing the ball at the tiny racquet head by hand, anything faster would have likely resulted in a miss):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v15/sanglier/Bounce2.gif


Several things jumped out at me when reviewing the videos.

1) Given the alternating layout of the mains on each side of the crosses, only 2 mains on my hybrid spaghetti are 'biting' the ball at any given time at these relatively low contact velocities. A normal spaghetti job would have doubled the number of 'teeth' on such bites, but perhaps at only a fraction of the depth (since the energy of the impact would have been spread out over twice as many strings), so I am not sure that my hybrid is necessarily at a disadvantage to the real thing in this regard. At higher contact velocities, the mains on the other side of the cross sandwich might even come into play to some extent.

2) The mains really do move A TON compared to those on a conventionally strung racquet (which I also tested). This does not come as a surprise, considering that these strings are basically sitting on needle bearings. The unrestrained movement has a couple of effects on the ball: a) the initial 'give' in the strings likely increased the amount of time the ball stayed in contact with the mains; b) the sharp recoil of the strings back to their original positions could have added to the angular velocity of the ball as it exited the string bed (i.e., more spin). It's like polys on steroids!

3) The mains do indeed move in unison, but I don't think this is as significant a factor in imparting spin to the ball as 2) above. However, having all the mains moving in the same direction - even those that are not in direct contact with the ball - can only mean that more energy is harnessed from a greater area of the string bed to move the ball in the direction of the spin than would have been the case without the ties. Spreading the impact energy across more strings also means more control (this would explain why the racquet was unplayable before I installed the ties).

4) The sharp reduction in friction between the mains and the crosses would have produced an infinitely smoother power curve than that of a conventional string job (Fig 5 of the Cross and Lindsey study), but it comes at the expense of increased string vibrations (in my videos, those strings oscillated wildly and seemingly forever after the contact). It would have required a lot more than the little Fischer rubber thingie in the throat to dampen all that out. On a double-strung spaghetti, this might be less of an issue, as each string pair may act as their own vibration dampener by interfering with one another's oscillations.

5) Werner Fischer was a genius to have figured all this out without the help of high speed videos and fancy algorithms. Or maybe he did have access to a well-appointed physics lab?

6) Those who made this thing illegal are first order party poopers.

coachrick
08-30-2012, 09:52 PM
Without making it sound as simple as it is, I believe the ban was not because of predictable EXCESS spin, but because of the less-predictable 'knuckle-ball' action allowed by the much less scientific string patterns being tested...as such, materially affecting the nature of the game. Something akin to a lacrosse stick being used for tennis.

I think the ruling was appropriate and SHOULD have led to stricter limits on racket size BEFORE the 'horse left the barn'. :)

retrowagen
08-30-2012, 10:51 PM
I admire your inquisitive mind and dedication in revisiting this (in)famous chapter of tennis equipment history!

Like Rick, I too think the ITF ban on the spaghetti string job was just. The sport would not be as satisfying if every single strike of the racquet brought a funky knuckleball and the unknown with it.

Sanglier
08-31-2012, 10:43 AM
Yes, trying to replicate and take whacks at the corpse of this long dead horse did make me feel like I am on an episode of "Cold Case - The Racquetholic Nerd Edition". My interest in this is purely historic and mechanistic, as is the case with anyone collecting weird and unusual sticks.

I didn't pick up my first racquet until 1980, so I missed the whole Nastase/ Vilas controversy by a couple of years. Watching videos of their infamous match now gives me little indication of the unfair edge Nastase evidently enjoyed over Vilas beyond the greater top spins he was generating. I also didn't build up much of an attachment to the truly 'classical' feel of the game, as I quickly went from a borrowed woodie to a generic aluminum to an oversized fiberglass composite. Having never played competitively, I had little concern over what was kosher and what wasn't in a competitive settting. The only standard by which I judged any racquet offering I've encountered since then has been - would I have fun playing with it? In this context, the spaghetti is a legitimate (albeit excessively labor-intensive) innovation to me. As the Coach pointed out, disallowing the spaghetti while doing virtually nothing to curb the evolution of the frames has not prevented the game from undergoing qualitative changes over the years. A modern frame dressed in polys would outspin a spaghetti Superform any day. So what exactly was achieved through the ban other than delaying the inevitable?

It's interesting that you both mentioned the possibility of knuckle ball producing string jobs as a motivating factor behind the ban. Given the physical parameters, the spaghetti is the last thing anyone would have used to suppress spins. So there were in fact other hacks working on unconventional string configurations within that same time frame, who were able to reduce ball spin without sacrificing control? This is news to me. I'll have to dig a little more into this and see what I can find out, and maybe try to replicate their exploits. I am interested in this because by extrapolating from the results of this 'TWU' study (http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/kickserve.php), one would have come to the conclusion that, at least theoretically, the only way to generate a knuckle ball is to hit the ball with a perfectly flat swing at the apex of the bounce curve. I am curious how those hacks were able to overcome this limitation with their string job, as it is a much tougher puzzle to solve than the one Werner Fischer had worked on.

Hall of Fame Racquets
09-01-2012, 12:50 AM
Yes, trying to replicate and take whacks at the corpse of this long dead horse did make me feel like I am on an episode of "Cold Case - The Racquetholic Nerd Edition". My interest in this is purely historic and mechanistic, as is the case with anyone collecting weird and unusual sticks.

I didn't pick up my first racquet until 1980, so I missed the whole Nastase/ Vilas controversy by a couple of years. Watching videos of their infamous match now gives me little indication of the unfair edge Nastase evidently enjoyed over Vilas beyond the greater top spins he was generating. I also didn't build up much of an attachment to the truly 'classical' feel of the game, as I quickly went from a borrowed woodie to a generic aluminum to an oversized fiberglass composite. Having never played competitively, I had little concern over what was kosher and what wasn't in a competitive settting. The only standard by which I judged any racquet offering I've encountered since then has been - would I have fun playing with it? In this context, the spaghetti is a legitimate (albeit excessively labor-intensive) innovation to me. As the Coach pointed out, disallowing the spaghetti while doing virtually nothing to curb the evolution of the frames has not prevented the game from undergoing qualitative changes over the years. A modern frame dressed in polys would outspin a spaghetti Superform any day. So what exactly was achieved through the ban other than delaying the inevitable?

It's interesting that you both mentioned the possibility of knuckle ball producing string jobs as a motivating factor behind the ban. Given the physical parameters, the spaghetti is the last thing anyone would have used to suppress spins. So there were in fact other hacks working on unconventional string configurations within that same time frame, who were able to reduce ball spin without sacrificing control? This is news to me. I'll have to dig a little more into this and see what I can find out, and maybe try to replicate their exploits. I am interested in this because by extrapolating from the results of this 'TWU' study (http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/kickserve.php), one would have come to the conclusion that, at least theoretically, the only way to generate a knuckle ball is to hit the ball with a perfectly flat swing at the apex of the bounce curve. I am curious how those hacks were able to overcome this limitation with their string job, as it is a much tougher puzzle to solve than the one Werner Fischer had worked on.

I find your interest in the spaghetti racquets as stimulating! About eight months ago I received a call from a London film producer who is doing a documentary on how the spaghetti racquet has affected tennis history. He wanted to film an interview with me in the Tennis Racquet Hall of Fame as a tennis collector about how I viewed this very significant spaghetti racquet development in the advancement of the tennis racquet. A film crew spent twelve hours on two occasions filming my "segment" contribution which included reference to other tennis racquet developments from 1878-2012.

Other segments include one by Werner Fisher and another by Michael Fishbach and others who were very aware of spaghetti racquet history. I have seen the Werner Fisher segment and how he envisioned and developed his "spaghetti" racquet and found his invention thinking as fascinating. I think this documentary will be very stimulating for international tennis fans.

I am very interested in more thoughts and research from your "tennis laboratory"!! I would be very interested in adding an example of your spaghetti creation to the Tennis Racquet Hall of Fame. I have been collecting any variation of "spaghetti racquets" that I can find. You will see some of the spaghetti racquets I have collected so far in the US Open Room. http://s834.photobucket.com/albums/zz268/Alamocrest/Tennis%20Racquet%20Hall%20of%20Fame%203/

Hannah19
09-01-2012, 08:00 AM
HoFR, I acquired some Pancho Segura sweet Spots by Sabine Tennis Project. It's open spaced stringing pattern (12x16) was to enlarge the sweetspot. In Kuebler's book I found interesting info on how a Spaghetti type of stringing pattern was developed for this frame so I decided to string on eup like that.
Check this link for pics:http://vintagetennisgems.nl/VTG/Rackets_by_brands/Paginas/Miscelanious_1.html#195

Sanglier
09-01-2012, 12:18 PM
I find your interest in the spaghetti racquets as stimulating! About eight months ago I received a call from a London film producer who is doing a documentary on how the spaghetti racquet has affected tennis history. He wanted to film an interview with me in the Tennis Racquet Hall of Fame as a tennis collector about how I viewed this very significant spaghetti racquet development in the advancement of the tennis racquet. A film crew spent twelve hours on two occasions filming my "segment" contribution which included reference to other tennis racquet developments from 1878-2012.

Other segments include one by Werner Fisher and another by Michael Fishbach and others who were very aware of spaghetti racquet history. I have seen the Werner Fisher segment and how he envisioned and developed his "spaghetti" racquet and found his invention thinking as fascinating. I think this documentary will be very stimulating for international tennis fans.

I am very interested in more thoughts and research from your "tennis laboratory"!! I would be very interested in adding an example of your spaghetti creation to the Tennis Racquet Hall of Fame. I have been collecting any variation of "spaghetti racquets" that I can find. You will see some of the spaghetti racquets I have collected so far in the US Open Room. http://s834.photobucket.com/albums/zz268/Alamocrest/Tennis%20Racquet%20Hall%20of%20Fame%203/

You are too kind, HoFR! This is strictly amateur hour stuff. My 'laboratory' consists of a wobbly Threelastic Allround staked to the middle of my lawn, with a camera sitting underneath pointed up at the strings, and a netting on the other side to keep the wayward balls from skipping into my shrubberies.

I've visited your famous online gallery multiple times, but somehow never noticed those spaghettis (perhaps because there are just way too many other interesting racquets to gawk at!). I am most intrigued by the W. Fischer racquet in image 0807. Is that an original string job? If so, then this is evidence that Fischer did in fact experiment with a single-strung layout, with alternating mains; only in this iteration, he glued(?) the mains to long tubings through which the crosses are strung. It's an elegantly simple solution that does away with the need to tube the mains and tie them together. However, I suspect in practice it wouldn't have worked as well as the double-strung layout (or my hybrid), because there is way too much contact between those long tubings and the cross strings for the former to easily glide over the latter (though I would have to string one up like this to know that for certain). My hybrid is basically a cross between this simpler layout and the tubing + tie arrangement of the double-strung version. I can't imagine that Fischer wouldn't have thought about this and experimented with it already; which is why I very much look forward to the release of the new documentary that you just described. I hope it will be picked up in the US!

I'd be more than glad to have another go at this so that you'll have one more illegal alien to add to your collection. Please email me at renntigerATyahooDOTcom if you would like to talk.

Hall of Fame Racquets
09-01-2012, 04:06 PM
You are too kind, HoFR! This is strictly amateur hour stuff. My 'laboratory' consists of a wobbly Threelastic Allround staked to the middle of my lawn, with a camera sitting underneath pointed up at the strings, and a netting on the other side to keep the wayward balls from skipping into my shrubberies.

I've visited your famous online gallery multiple times, but somehow never noticed those spaghettis (perhaps because there are just way too many other interesting racquets to gawk at!). I am most intrigued by the W. Fischer racquet in image 0807. Is that an original string job? If so, then this is evidence that Fischer did in fact experiment with a single-strung layout, with alternating mains; only in this iteration, he glued(?) the mains to long tubings through which the crosses are strung. It's an elegantly simple solution that does away with the need to tube the mains and tie them together. However, I suspect in practice it wouldn't have worked as well as the double-strung layout (or my hybrid), because there is way too much contact between those long tubings and the cross strings for the former to easily glide over the latter (though I would have to string one up like this to know that for certain). My hybrid is basically a cross between this simpler layout and the tubing + tie arrangement of the double-strung version. I can't imagine that Fischer wouldn't have thought about this and experimented with it already; which is why I very much look forward to the release of the new documentary that you just described. I hope it will be picked up in the US!

I'd be more than glad to have another go at this so that you'll have one more illegal alien to add to your collection. Please email me at renntigerATyahooDOTcom if you would like to talk.

It is my understanding that Werner Fisher made additional attempts to satisfy the ITF ban issues and image 0807 that you referred to is his second stringing invention where the main strings were connected with a Nylon tube. The cross strings were placed into this tube. There still was more spin produced but not as much as with the first "spaghetti" invention. However the ban was applied to this second stringing invention also as the key issue for the ITF was that strings of a racquet have to be "interwoven". More information and photos of this second Fisher stringing invention can be found in Kuebler's
Book of Tennis Rackets Update 2010.

Thanks for clarifying your "tennis laboratory"! I am aware that many great observations and discoveries occur in very humble beginnings. Thanks for the stimulation please continue providing your very meaningful insights.

I hope the documentary emerges in the coming year. The film producer is a very famous and much sought after screen writer also so he has been very busy. He has already received an Oscar nomination in his field in the past and will likely be receiving others in the future. It would be great if he would receive additional high regard in the film and tennis worlds for this "spaghetti racquet" documentary. He definitely has the brilliant ability and creativity to make this happen!!

d-quik
07-31-2013, 12:10 PM
what head sizes did these monsters come in?