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View Full Version : What gauge if you're stringing for other's?


johndagolfer
03-18-2010, 08:47 AM
My problem is that I play with 17 Gosen Micro and 17 Genesis Spin X. If I were going to string for others who do not know much about stringing and don't mind gosen should I move up to 16 for it?

Also Is it bad that my crosses are thicker than my Spin X mains? Will the thick string cause earlier breakage?

Thanks

aangstman01
03-18-2010, 09:14 AM
Well, i could be wrong but i think i read somewhere that using a thicker gauge cross actually prevents breakage and that's one of the benefits of hybriding is to slow down wear and often soften up the string bed if you're using a poly main.

johndagolfer
03-18-2010, 09:28 AM
Hmmm so all I lose is a little bit of feel. I am just not too sure how receptive people are to 17g. Do most of the casual players you know use 16g or 17g?

jazzyfunkybluesy
03-18-2010, 09:29 AM
A thicker string of the same brand is always more durable and more stiff.

Check this website for reference.

www.Racquetsportsindustry.com

johndagolfer
03-18-2010, 09:37 AM
thanks Jazzy. So would you all suggest that in my situation I should get the 16g because that's what most people would use and it shouldn't affect my play much (other than touch and feel)

aangstman01
03-18-2010, 09:42 AM
yeah i mean i would expect that most casual players will not notice a difference in gauge anyway, so i'd say maybe keep a few sets of 17g layin around in case you get someone who has done some research, or if you want it for yourself.

decades
03-18-2010, 09:56 AM
most casual players don't know what gauge is. It's your job to educate them if they are even interested.

beststringer
03-18-2010, 11:35 AM
definitely give them the most durable combo if you want repeat businesses. they will blame u for mishits and crap.

in general, i think there are some good rules before you take someone's business:

1. Use your own string. If they bring their own, tell them that they would still have to pay you if the string snapped, has defect, or is too short.
2. Check for cracks in the racket. And if they insist to have it strung, ask them to pay first for the labor. Sometimes it's tough to finish a job on a cracked racket.
3. Use durable strings. Avoid thin first gen polys.

MuscleWeave
03-18-2010, 12:17 PM
I'm a casual player, but an informed consumer, and not a string breaker. I have been using a full set of Multifeel 16 on my Dunlop MW 200G 95. I tried a set of 17g, but found that it didn't feel substantial to me. I'm getting into poly/Multifeel hybrids for my new AG200. I've decided to go with 16g for multis and 17g for polys. I'm thinking that a poly string will feel more substantial than a non-poly.

I don't string my own racquets, and if you were my stringer, I would expect you to make a little effort to guage how much I want to know about properties and performance of strings. As for me, we could have a mutually rewarding conversation and I would go to the courts with a properly performing racquet. All customers are unique, and you'll never know who we are until you ask.

My stinger keeps recommending products for me that will give me more power, and I'm gatting tired of it, but at least he's trying.

johndagolfer
03-18-2010, 12:46 PM
That is good sound advice muscle. My initial clientelle will be my high school tennis team. They are still pretty new and probably will not break strings more than once during the season.

As for anyone else who may seek my stringing services around the area I'll be sure to ask them about their game,what they've used before, how often they break,etc.

My biggest problem is that unless I stock a ton of string, I'll have to order what they need. Either than that they will have to use what I have available.

The majority of my string is 17g. I don't plan on making this a big side business. So I am just hoping that people will be understanding of my limitations. The good thing is that I am charging half of what the big stores are offering and I am not 30 to 40 minutes away like they are.

goran_ace
03-18-2010, 01:14 PM
If you're stringing for others who really don't care what they play with, I'd stick with 16g synthetic gut or even 15L syngut or nylon.

In my experience stringing for a wide range of customers, you can try to educate them on the benefits of thinner gauge, sometimes they just don't care or don't listen. If you give someone like that 17g, don't be surprised if they complain when the string starts to move or if it breaks and will insist that you gave them a bad string job.

Those that know the difference will ask for it.

MuscleWeave
03-18-2010, 01:17 PM
That is good sound advice muscle. My initial clientelle will be my high school tennis team. They are still pretty new and probably will not break strings more than once during the season.

As for anyone else who may seek my stringing services around the area I'll be sure to ask them about their game,what they've used before, how often they break,etc.

My biggest problem is that unless I stock a ton of string, I'll have to order what they need. Either than that they will have to use what I have available.

The majority of my string is 17g. I don't plan on making this a big side business. So I am just hoping that people will be understanding of my limitations. The good thing is that I am charging half of what the big stores are offering and I am not 30 to 40 minutes away like they are.

Thanks, jdg

I think it is very important that your players know in advance what type of string and what gauge they will be getting in their racquets. Then be open and able to answer any questions that they may have, prior to making a purchase.

Steve Huff
03-18-2010, 06:49 PM
This is where a good stringer earns his/her money. You have to be able to match up string setups to each player. 16g is right for some, `18g is right for others. Poly is right for some, natural gut others. Hybrids can be good for a lot of people, but you have to know how to set up combos that work for different peple. Just because YOU like something, doesn't mean someone else will. Being able to listen to their comments and knowing their current setup is a great starting point. It's best if you know what they like and don't like about their current setup, but equally important to know how to go about changing it for the better. You need to know your strings well enough too, so that if someone wants a thinner gauge, you can say, "This sounds like what you want, but it won't last as long. So, if durability is an issue, I wouldn't recommend it." For people who don't have a clue about their strings, the last thing you want to happen is for it to break before THEY expect it to. So, if you haven't educated them about strings, try to make sure it lasts as long as they expect it to.

Valjean
03-19-2010, 04:59 AM
That is good sound advice muscle. My initial clientelle will be my high school tennis team. They are still pretty new and probably will not break strings more than once during the season.

As for anyone else who may seek my stringing services around the area I'll be sure to ask them about their game,what they've used before, how often they break,etc.

My biggest problem is that unless I stock a ton of string, I'll have to order what they need. Either than that they will have to use what I have available.

The majority of my string is 17g. I don't plan on making this a big side business. So I am just hoping that people will be understanding of my limitations. The good thing is that I am charging half of what the big stores are offering and I am not 30 to 40 minutes away like they are.
If you try and offer principally 17, you may be disappointed. The standard now is the thicker 16, and the thing inexperienced, younger players fear most is early breakage--not least because it's their parents who are paying for their string jobs. Some 17 gauge strings, by the way, are made stiffer than their company's 16.

JT_2eighty
03-19-2010, 12:31 PM
This is where a good stringer earns his/her money. You have to be able to match up string setups to each player. 16g is right for some, `18g is right for others. Poly is right for some, natural gut others. Hybrids can be good for a lot of people, but you have to know how to set up combos that work for different peple. Just because YOU like something, doesn't mean someone else will. Being able to listen to their comments and knowing their current setup is a great starting point. It's best if you know what they like and don't like about their current setup, but equally important to know how to go about changing it for the better. You need to know your strings well enough too, so that if someone wants a thinner gauge, you can say, "This sounds like what you want, but it won't last as long. So, if durability is an issue, I wouldn't recommend it." For people who don't have a clue about their strings, the last thing you want to happen is for it to break before THEY expect it to. So, if you haven't educated them about strings, try to make sure it lasts as long as they expect it to.

Exactly. I went to my usual pro shop a few years ago to try out full gut because I was having arm soreness. He said it was pricey (which it was and I was willing to splurge to see), but he talked me into poly mains/gut x... AND he said he'd just string at same tension as my synthetic because the poly will lose a lot of tension. He never mentioned about poly's going dead, being stiffer than other strings I had used before, or anything. I used that damn setup until they broke, practically got TE in the process, and then read up on strings for myself to learn that even MRTs can have their facts/myths mixed up. I kept using that setup thinking, "ok, these are going to loosen up soon, just stick with it.. by why does it feel like they are getting stiffer?" Well, crap, it's because they were, thanks MRT...

Now I string my own racquets, which has not only saved me money, but allowed me to experiment with various setups:

To your OP, when I started playing 20some years ago, I just got plain ol 16g gamma synthetic, and never knew the difference of strings. Even after 10 years of learning, drills, improvement, high school tennis, etc, I just kept using the same stuff.

Then one day a few years ago (in my late 20s by that point), the pro shop I went to was out of the 16g, and recommended the 17g as I'd get more "bite" and feel. I said, "sure whatever," because I was always taught that a good player should be able to play with a crap string or fancy string, with little affect on your game, as it really is technique that is the #1 factor.

Let me tell you, that first hit with the 17g string was one of those "wow, what have I been missing" moments. The enhanced feel, control, touch, and ease in imparting spin, etc. was amazing. I wish my stringer had suggested the 17g earlier in my playing career. Instead he suggested me poly/gut strings later on to 'help' my arm soreness. Gah! Wish I had bought my stringer 10 years ago...

You should tell them about the 16 and 17 gauge differences, that one will be better in durability, while the other is better in playability.