PDA

View Full Version : Classic METAL Racquets Thread - ALUMINIUM to TENSILIUM


jimbo333
03-30-2010, 08:49 AM
I thought maybe classic METAL racquets deserved their own thread:)

So I reckon it all started here in about 1925 with the Birmal!

Made in Birmingham England and made of Aluminium:)

http://i46.tinypic.com/35jbeoh.jpg

jimbo333
03-30-2010, 08:56 AM
Not sure of the year of this one in the late 70's, someone will know:)

It's the Slazenger X10, made of Tensilium!

http://i44.tinypic.com/fp9hli.jpg

It was used by Manuel Orantes!

http://i41.tinypic.com/1oaauf.jpg

You can see Borg thinking "Why are you about to use that awful new metal racquet against me, and it doesn't matter as you'll lose anyway" LOL

jimbo333
03-30-2010, 09:03 AM
Some close-ups of the Slazenger X10, made of Tensilium:)

http://i44.tinypic.com/2dqv9lj.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/105p6v4.jpg

galain
03-30-2010, 10:22 AM
I don't have any pics, but classics from my youth -

The green Yonex/Yoneyama YY ???
Slazengers Panther
Dunlop's Volley
Slazengers Challenge X-2 (I think)
The Princes (especially the Mag Pro)
and - Head made a beautiful stick in the mid 80's but i can't put my finger on its name. Tournament Edge perhaps?

I don't remember the metals being around for very long - but they were great fun to play with.

jimbo333
03-30-2010, 10:31 AM
I don't have any pics, but classics from my youth -

The green Yonex/Yoneyama YY ???
Slazengers Panther
Dunlop's Volley
Slazengers Challenge X-2 (I think)
The Princes (especially the Mag Pro)
and - Head made a beautiful stick in the mid 80's but i can't put my finger on its name. Tournament Edge perhaps?

I don't remember the metals being around for very long - but they were great fun to play with.

All cool racquets, I reckon:)

The metals weren't around for long really. Basically the 70's as far as being popular. They were around before and after, but the metal racquets had their day mainly in the 70's!

Like I said in another thread though, as far as UK was concerned the metals were never anywhere near the dominant type of racquet. In the 70's wood still was the main racquet and that went to graphite in the early 80's quite quickly!

So metal in the UK didn't get much of a look in, and were quite rare to find sometimes! I think that's why I like them so much now:)

tennis005
03-30-2010, 11:01 AM
Let's not forget the Wilson T and TX series rackets.

jimbo333
03-30-2010, 11:37 AM
Let's not forget the Wilson T and TX series rackets.

Absolutely, the steel classics from the late 60's and 70's:)

This is gpt's great photo montage of the Wilson T2000, also showing the original Lacoste version!

http://i684.photobucket.com/albums/vv210/gpt25963/T2000photos.jpg

jimbo333
03-30-2010, 05:11 PM
And here's the Aluminium original Weed:)

It's about 140sqin!

(My photo doesn't do it justice unfortunately)

http://i47.tinypic.com/t9codk.jpg

joe sch
03-30-2010, 09:53 PM
How about a T2000 with some spaghetti ...

http://www.woodtennis.com/strings/t2000pasta.jpg

Mansewerz
03-30-2010, 10:09 PM
I've got a wilson t3000 and a Chemold Rocket

tennis005
03-30-2010, 10:20 PM
How about a T2000 with some spaghetti ...

http://www.woodtennis.com/strings/t2000pasta.jpg

Cool!!! Never seen that one before.

jimbo333
03-31-2010, 02:53 AM
How about a T2000 with some spaghetti ...

http://www.woodtennis.com/strings/t2000pasta.jpg

Superb Joe:)

Have you played with it?

(And love the fact the photo is called "T2000Pasta":)

jimbo333
03-31-2010, 02:54 AM
I've got a wilson t3000 and a Chemold Rocket

Would like to see a photo of the Chemold Rocket:)

joe sch
03-31-2010, 06:12 AM
Superb Joe:)

Have you played with it?

(And love the fact the photo is called "T2000Pasta":)

Yes, I did take it out for a hit and as advertised, the ball took all kinds of crazy flight paths. I did not hit for too long since I wanted to keep this extremely labor intensive string job intact as a show piece.

joe sch
03-31-2010, 06:16 AM
Would like to see a photo of the Chemold Rocket:)

I have a few diff metals pictured at this page:

http://www.woodtennis.com/newMetal/newMetal.html

and a laver chemold at this page:

http://www.woodtennis.com/laver/

and how about the rosewall seamco:

http://www.woodtennis.com/rosewall/seamco_rosewall1.jpg

another classic metal is the gonzales spalding smasher:

http://www.woodtennis.com/panchogonzales/panchogonzales3racketsa.jpg

and the newk tiebreaker:

http://www.woodtennis.com/newcombe/

Mansewerz
03-31-2010, 10:49 AM
I'll post when I get a chance :D

joe sch
03-31-2010, 12:55 PM
I'll post when I get a chance :D

Is this it ? http://www.woodtennis.com/laver/chemoldlaver1.jpg

jimbo333
04-01-2010, 03:05 AM
Here's a good one!

A Slazenger Titanium XL:)

http://i39.tinypic.com/2ur9ueg.jpg

http://i43.tinypic.com/mttu9e.jpg

coachrick
04-01-2010, 07:53 AM
Here's a good one!

A Slazenger Titanium XL:)

http://i39.tinypic.com/2ur9ueg.jpg

http://i43.tinypic.com/mttu9e.jpg

I've got a never-strung w/tag Slaz Ti coming any day! I was not aware of this model when it was 'current' (?). Not sure if I will string it or not...might be fun to add to the hitting collection.

One challenge I'm having is taking out all these itty-bitty rackets in our never-ending 25mph+ winds !!! Makes chasing that ball quite a task! :)

tennis005
04-01-2010, 07:58 AM
I hear you. Texas is quite a windy place this time of year. What's fun is hitting a lob straight up in the wind and watching land three courts away.

gamma366
04-01-2010, 10:26 AM
Is there someone can explain why the same metal frame was made or sold by different brands? I.e WILSON T 2000- LACOSTE(I DON'T REMEMBER THE MODEL) or PDP OPEN-HEAD PROFESSIONAL-ADIDAS NDS660(CORRECT?) and a frame by DUNLOP endorsed by Colin Dibley and Evonne Goolagong . Thanks

joe sch
04-01-2010, 12:39 PM
Is there someone can explain why the same metal frame was made or sold by different brands? I.e WILSON T 2000- LACOSTE(I DON'T REMEMBER THE MODEL) or PDP OPEN-HEAD PROFESSIONAL-ADIDAS NDS660(CORRECT?) and a frame by DUNLOP endorsed by Colin Dibley and Evonne Goolagong . Thanks

The Lacoste metal was the prototype for the wilson t2000.
PDP and Head did not make any rackets that were designed like the T-series metals. Are you confusing models ?

coachrick
04-01-2010, 12:59 PM
The Lacoste metal was the prototype for the wilson t2000.
PDP and Head did not make any rackets that were designed like the T-series metals. Are you confusing models ?

I think gamma was comparing the Head Pro, PDP Open and Dunlop Volley...all similar in that they were aluminum hairpins with nylon/zytel throat inserts--but, they were NOT the same rackets(not even the same hairpin). The other metal reference was what you mentioned--the T2000 and Lacoste 'twins'.

jimbo333
04-01-2010, 04:39 PM
Is there someone can explain why the same metal frame was made or sold by different brands? I.e WILSON T 2000- LACOSTE(I DON'T REMEMBER THE MODEL) or PDP OPEN-HEAD PROFESSIONAL-ADIDAS NDS660(CORRECT?) and a frame by DUNLOP endorsed by Colin Dibley and Evonne Goolagong . Thanks

Yes, I know what you mean, although as explained above some of those that you've mentioned are actually slightly different racquets!

But, when they are the same, it is normally because the brands or designs were owned the same company.

For example as Joe was basically saying the design for the Wilson T2000 was sold by Lacoste, and then Lacoste and Wilson both produced basically the same racquet!

Similar with the PDP Open which is identical to a Le Coq Sportif metal (which I can't remember the name of), either both brands owned by same people (not sure here), or patent sold to the other brand/company!

kalic
04-01-2010, 11:24 PM
What's flex rating of average aluminium racquet ?

gamma366
04-03-2010, 05:52 PM
Thanks a lot guys! Do you know if exists a website where to find the history of racket brands? I didn't find anything. I'd like to know which end had such glorious brands like Snauwaert, Bancroft, Donnay, PDP and Spalding(rackets). Thanks in advance

jimbo333
04-04-2010, 04:55 AM
What's flex rating of average aluminium racquet ?

This is a great question, and I don't know the answer!

Anyone?

jimbo333
04-04-2010, 04:56 AM
Thanks a lot guys! Do you know if exists a website where to find the history of racket brands? I didn't find anything. I'd like to know which end had such glorious brands like Snauwaert, Bancroft, Donnay, PDP and Spalding(rackets). Thanks in advance

The nearest to what you're looking for is maybe "80s-tennis.com":)

Not really a history of brands, but probably nearest to what you're after!

dataseviltwin
04-05-2010, 04:51 AM
Daytons - ca. 1930... http://i720.photobucket.com/albums/ww206/dataseviltwin/Racks%201-3/Daytons.jpg

Even the strings were metal!

Kemitak
04-08-2010, 12:24 PM
Daytons - ca. 1930...
Even the strings were metal!

If the strings were metal, what were the balls made of? :shock:

jimbo333
04-08-2010, 04:20 PM
If the strings were metal, what were the balls made of? :shock:

I'm guessing they might have looked like this:)

http://i42.tinypic.com/v2zoth.jpg

jimbo333
04-09-2010, 04:09 PM
Well here it is at last!

The T5000 with the dampner in buttcap still attached:)

http://i41.tinypic.com/2rpxjdh.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/2jeephj.jpg

jimbo333
04-09-2010, 04:14 PM
Took me years to find one!

http://i39.tinypic.com/dcfzw5.jpg

http://i40.tinypic.com/16lycsk.jpg

jimbo333
04-09-2010, 04:22 PM
And here is probably the rarest of the Wilson metal T-Series, the Wilson III:)

http://i42.tinypic.com/2vbnd60.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/14mf2hg.jpg

I think like the "C-1 Jimmy Connors" it's an updated version of the T3000?

jimbo333
04-11-2010, 11:20 AM
^^^^^^Anyone know anything about this metal "Wilson III" please?

jimbo333
04-12-2010, 05:42 PM
Oh well I guess not:(

Anyway here's another one, and this is made of Magnesium!

The Adidas Magnum-35:)

http://i44.tinypic.com/20gjsjd.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/kyyaq.jpg

Cesare
04-12-2010, 06:12 PM
Daytons - ca. 1930... http://i720.photobucket.com/albums/ww206/dataseviltwin/Racks%201-3/Daytons.jpg

Even the strings were metal!


That's a v-engine? i mean the white racquet..:)

jimbo333
04-14-2010, 02:55 AM
Oh well, this is my last photo.

It is the Superb looking Dunlop XLT-15:)

http://i44.tinypic.com/98vgpf.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/16lfvad.jpg

ericsson
04-14-2010, 03:09 AM
Well here it is at last!

The T5000 with the dampner in buttcap still attached:)

http://i41.tinypic.com/2rpxjdh.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/2jeephj.jpg

Wow nice find and great looking racket although i prefer the original Lacoste ;-)

max
04-14-2010, 07:47 AM
In my book, the T-2000 really made people pay attention to metal.

I'm surprised no one's mentioned the Red Head, the Head Professional. Used by Bettina Bunge and Wojtek Fibak.

MAXXply
04-14-2010, 07:58 AM
Oh well, this is my last photo.

It is the Superb looking Dunlop XLT-15:)

http://i44.tinypic.com/98vgpf.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/16lfvad.jpg

Jimbo have you heard of the XLT-PLUS ? Same shovel-headshape in a black, Prince Pro-style black aluminium colour.

MAXXply
04-14-2010, 08:07 AM
Did another variant succeed this HEAD Master 2 or was this the final version of HEAD's metal rackets at the time ? :confused:

http://i39.tinypic.com/n76gg.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/2v339jl.jpg

jimbo333
04-14-2010, 10:08 AM
Jimbo have you heard of the XLT-PLUS ? Same shovel-headshape in a black, Prince Pro-style black aluminium colour.

No never heard of the XLT-PLUS, I tend to collect only the standard sized metals though:)

gpt
04-14-2010, 10:24 AM
In my book, the T-2000 really made people pay attention to metal.

I'm surprised no one's mentioned the Red Head, the Head Professional. Used by Bettina Bunge and Wojtek Fibak.

I thought the same thing.

I found an All Pro branded racquet in a junk shop that is pretty much an exact copy of the Head Pro right down to the throat insert.

Kemitak
04-14-2010, 12:38 PM
Here's my new Head Vector (Thanks to coachrick for not outbidding me). When I get it strung, I'll let everyone know how it plays, if you're interested. To answer MAXXply's question, I'm guessing the Vector came after the Master 2. The tag on the Vector says 1980.

http://i44.tinypic.com/29yqy4n.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/33u8h8p.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/risu3q.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/v8e78j.jpg

Centered
04-14-2010, 01:09 PM
"Tensilium" eh?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bivalve_shell

The latest in clam tech!

coachrick
04-14-2010, 01:28 PM
Here's my new Head Vector (Thanks to coachrick for not outbidding me). When I get it strung, I'll let everyone know how it plays, if you're interested. To answer MAXXply's question, I'm guessing the Vector came after the Master 2. The tag on the Vector says 1980.


Glad you got it! I can't see a difference between the Master 2 and the original(is there a change in the throat insert?). I'll bet we didn't sell a half-dozen Masters after the Edge was introduced. For our shop, the Master faded well before the Vector hit the stores.

BTW, I missed THREE 'auctions' on that site by a total of one-dollar and fifty cents! THREE different listings by fifty cents EACH! Maybe somebody is trying to tell me something :) .

They're not all for me...I promise! I re-furb playable rackets to give to a local tennis center to be used in their after-school and community tennis programs. Gotta watch the budget since I don't charge for the rackets or the re-hab work. (Yeah, I'm KEEPING the Slaz Ti. )

coachrick
04-14-2010, 01:38 PM
Oh well, this is my last photo.

It is the Superb looking Dunlop XLT-15:)

http://i44.tinypic.com/98vgpf.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/16lfvad.jpg

Back in my Dunlop rep days, I filled in at a retail store in Atlanta to help out a friend. This was the first beautiful Saturday before the start of spring ALTA and the store was PACKED!!! We had closed out the XLT-15 and the retail sale price was $19.99 plus stringing. I sold and strung 21 rackets that day---FIFTEEN of them were the XLT-15! :)

The XLT 'egg-shape' came and went pretty quickly in Atlanta. Dunlop made too many models based on the unusual shape. Too bad it didn't have the cachet of the Kneissl sticks back then!

jimbo333
04-14-2010, 04:37 PM
Here's my new Head Vector (Thanks to coachrick for not outbidding me). When I get it strung, I'll let everyone know how it plays, if you're interested. To answer MAXXply's question, I'm guessing the Vector came after the Master 2. The tag on the Vector says 1980.

http://i44.tinypic.com/29yqy4n.jpg


A great metal racquet:)

Similar to my metal Head - Final (String-Lock)!

http://i43.tinypic.com/b88s3m.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/o5xs9w.jpg

jimbo333
04-14-2010, 04:40 PM
More photos of the metal Head - Final (String-Lock):)

http://i41.tinypic.com/2dv8rw5.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/qnwowh.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/5d2zw0.jpg

Realise I've posted these before, but it's such a great racquet!

jimbo333
04-14-2010, 04:43 PM
Back in my Dunlop rep days, I filled in at a retail store in Atlanta to help out a friend. This was the first beautiful Saturday before the start of spring ALTA and the store was PACKED!!! We had closed out the XLT-15 and the retail sale price was $19.99 plus stringing. I sold and strung 21 rackets that day---FIFTEEN of them were the XLT-15! :)

The XLT 'egg-shape' came and went pretty quickly in Atlanta. Dunlop made too many models based on the unusual shape. Too bad it didn't have the cachet of the Kneissl sticks back then!

Dunlop always seemed to have a "cheap" reputation, and not in a good way. But I've always liked their racquets:)

By the way Coachrick, do you know anything about that "Wilson III" racquet I posted earlier?

I've never seen this until recently, which surprised me as I thought I knew all the Wilson metal T-series!

Kemitak
04-14-2010, 05:23 PM
I wonder if the Vector and the Final differ apart from the colour of the throat piece? They look like they were separated at birth. Would the string lock work on the Vector too?

coachrick
04-14-2010, 06:05 PM
Dunlop always seemed to have a "cheap" reputation, and not in a good way. But I've always liked their racquets:)

By the way Coachrick, do you know anything about that "Wilson III" racquet I posted earlier?

I've never seen this until recently, which surprised me as I thought I knew all the Wilson metal T-series!

Interesting that you say 'cheap'...when I was contemplating a rep position with Dunlop, I asked myself if I would be 'excited' to be a part of the Dunlop family. Would I want to be on their teaching staff? Would I consider their rackets to be 'quality'? Would I 'show off' my racket with a stencil if I were to play with one?

Until J-Mac switched to the 200G, the most exciting thing about the line was the A-Player ball. The US Headquarters and main warehouse/tennis ball factory were located in my territory so there was a bit of a 'home grown' image with Dunlop in the southeast US. We didn't trade on the 'snob appeal' of the Slazenger name nor did the tennis division take advantage of the high standing of the golf image at that time. I sold the heck out of tennis balls...rackets were so-so.

I agree that the my Jimmy Connors C-1 is likely a re-badged T3000 as is the Wilson III, most likely. Mayhaps they were Special Make Up units for a large retailer.

coachrick
04-14-2010, 06:08 PM
I wonder if the Vector and the Final differ apart from the colour of the throat piece? They look like they were separated at birth. Would the string lock work on the Vector too?

They look the same to me. I'll bet the String-Lok gizmos would fit either since the US String Lok barrels also fit the Red Head and metal Edge along with the US Vector.

jimbo333
04-15-2010, 04:45 AM
Interesting that you say 'cheap'...when I was contemplating a rep position with Dunlop, I asked myself if I would be 'excited' to be a part of the Dunlop family. Would I want to be on their teaching staff? Would I consider their rackets to be 'quality'? Would I 'show off' my racket with a stencil if I were to play with one?

Until J-Mac switched to the 200G, the most exciting thing about the line was the A-Player ball. The US Headquarters and main warehouse/tennis ball factory were located in my territory so there was a bit of a 'home grown' image with Dunlop in the southeast US. We didn't trade on the 'snob appeal' of the Slazenger name nor did the tennis division take advantage of the high standing of the golf image at that time. I sold the heck out of tennis balls...rackets were so-so.

I agree that the my Jimmy Connors C-1 is likely a re-badged T3000 as is the Wilson III, most likely. Mayhaps they were Special Make Up units for a large retailer.

Yes it's interesting about Dunlop. I've always liked their racquets like I said, but many people don't!

You are no doubt right about the "Wilson III", it's just that I've never seen another, whereas the C1- Jimmy Connors can be found if you look hard for them:)

jimbo333
04-15-2010, 04:46 AM
They look the same to me. I'll bet the String-Lok gizmos would fit either since the US String Lok barrels also fit the Red Head and metal Edge along with the US Vector.

Yes they are the same I think!

I also have a String-Lock Vector somethere, but can't find it easily at the moment:-?

jimbo333
04-16-2010, 06:56 AM
"Tensilium" eh?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bivalve_shell

The latest in clam tech!

Lost me there:confused:

Centered
04-16-2010, 09:07 PM
Lost me there:confused:

Open the article and search tensilium in your browser.

Don T.
04-21-2010, 03:42 PM
Probably not a classic but still a well crafted racquet for the times....solid Aluminum I suppose...Pro/Am 4-5/8

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f325/tokaiboy/proam1.jpg

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f325/tokaiboy/proam3.jpg

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f325/tokaiboy/proam4.jpg

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f325/tokaiboy/proam5.jpg

jimbo333
04-21-2010, 05:04 PM
Nice photos:)

Looks great, but truly awful to play with!

Don T.
04-21-2010, 06:27 PM
You got that right! The racquet really feels like a mis-hit on every shot.:roll:

coachrick
04-21-2010, 06:28 PM
Nice photos:)

Looks great, but truly awful to play with!

Speaking of nice photos, their ad in Tennis Magazine showed a nude young lady sitting(facing away :) )with the racket standing behind her(strategically positioned, of course). I REALLY wanted that racket but never laid eyes on one. What an elegant frame design...I'd still like to find one.

max
04-21-2010, 06:38 PM
. . . ummm. . . no one has a photo of the original Prince?

Don T.
04-21-2010, 07:06 PM
Speaking of nice photos, their ad in Tennis Magazine showed a nude young lady sitting(facing away :) )with the racket standing behind her(strategically positioned, of course). I REALLY wanted that racket but never laid eyes on one. What an elegant frame design...I'd still like to find one.

Coachrick....pick a number between 1 and 100.....:)

Centered
04-21-2010, 11:11 PM
So, I'm the only one who thinks it's funny that the results for "tensilium" in Google are clam ligaments/tendons?

I wanted to see if this is a real metal alloy, but all I could find are references to clam anatomy.

Marketing magic at its finest, I suppose.

jimbo333
04-22-2010, 02:10 AM
So, I'm the only one who thinks it's funny that the results for "tensilium" in Google are clam ligaments/tendons?

I wanted to see if this is a real metal alloy, but all I could find are references to clam anatomy.

Marketing magic at its finest, I suppose.

Sorry mate, I didn't get it to begin with:)

So yes, it looks like Tensilium is the first "made up" racquet technology name, and look where we are now, yes BLX, LOL:)

Limpinhitter
07-09-2010, 09:36 AM
Did another variant succeed this HEAD Master 2 or was this the final version of HEAD's metal rackets at the time ? :confused:

http://i39.tinypic.com/n76gg.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/2v339jl.jpg

Bob Lutz used this racquet, and later, the one with the red (instead of blue) plastic throat.

jim e
07-10-2010, 06:50 PM
A few months ago, I got a Sterling metal (steel) racquet to string. I bet most here never even heard of one yet see one. Fortunately I had the manual from the manuf. back in the old days (1960's ) , and still had it, so I was able to string it. I since gave the instructions to the USRSA and they posted it on their site in case anyone else would get this obscure thing, as it had a series of pins to place the strings around, and the racquet needed to be mounted only one way facing up.I never thought that I would see another one of these things.Back in the 60's there were a few locals that I strung this for.

Heres a picture from the manuf. manual:

http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h111/JimandKim/scan0001.jpg

coachrick
07-10-2010, 09:38 PM
A few months ago, I got a Sterling metal (steel) racquet to string. I bet most here never even heard of one yet see one. Fortunately I had the manual from the manuf. back in the old days (1960's ) , and still had it, so I was able to string it. I since gave the instructions to the USRSA and they posted it on their site in case anyone else would get this obscure thing, as it had a series of pins to place the strings around, and the racquet needed to be mounted only one way facing up.I never thought that I would see another one of these things.Back in the 60's there were a few locals that I strung this for.

Heres a picture from the manuf. manual:

http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h111/JimandKim/scan0001.jpg

Thanks for the memories, jim. When I first started 'playing' tennis, I lived three blocks from a private girls' college. They had 6 courts and a backboard. Well, THIS sixteen year old was highly attracted to a tall, pretty young lady who played with the only Sterling I've ever seen. Seemed to fit her perfectly. Wonder what she's up to now? :)

adidasman
07-22-2010, 07:42 AM
Thanks a lot guys! Do you know if exists a website where to find the history of racket brands? I didn't find anything. I'd like to know which end had such glorious brands like Snauwaert, Bancroft, Donnay, PDP and Spalding(rackets). Thanks in advance The PDP Open and the adidas aluminum were the same frame with a different throat piece, probably both made by Seamco or someone. The Head Pro was similar, but the shape of the frame material was different (pentagonal or hexagonal or some kind of -agonal. ;)) So that one wasn't from the same manufacturer.

adidasman
07-22-2010, 07:46 AM
You got that right! The racquet really feels like a mis-hit on every shot.:roll: What a perfect way of describing the way the Pro-Am plays. The vibration from that thing is just astounding. (It's funny; I saw this comment before I actually knew what racquet you were talking about, and I thought to myself, "They must be referring to the Pro-Am!") It does look nice, though. They made such a big deal about it being molded in one complete piece rather than extruded; maybe there's a reason why no one did it their way. ;)

tennis005
07-22-2010, 06:04 PM
Have a question about the T Wilson Series. It is my understanding that some of the T's came with some sort of knob or dampening device attached to the buttcap. My questions are which of the T series racquets had it and is it hard to find them(referring to dampener)?

adidasman
07-23-2010, 01:23 PM
Have a question about the T Wilson Series. It is my understanding that some of the T's came with some sort of knob or dampening device attached to the buttcap. My questions are which of the T series racquets had it and is it hard to find them(referring to dampener)? That was the T4000 (which had a ball thingie on the end) and T5000 (which had a protruding rubber stalk), I believe. I'd guess those are pretty rare.

Virginia
07-23-2010, 03:19 PM
Just about impossible to find any with that dampener intact - ask jimbo. :)

coachrick
07-23-2010, 04:46 PM
Just about impossible to find any with that dampener intact - ask jimbo. :)

Heck, it was tough in the SEVENTIES to find one that hadn't broken off! :)

NLBwell
07-28-2010, 09:46 PM
Deleted .......

lazya4
09-20-2010, 12:19 AM
has anyone ever seen the metal racket that campagnolo, of bicycle fame, made? i've seen pixs but have never seen one in real life. it came out about the same time as a corkscrew, nut cracker, motorcycle, and automotive wheel were made by campagnolo. only the the corkscrew is still produced.

coachrick
09-20-2010, 07:48 AM
has anyone ever seen the metal racket that campagnolo, of bicycle fame, made? i've seen pixs but have never seen one in real life. it came out about the same time as a corkscrew, nut cracker, motorcycle, and automotive wheel were made by campagnolo. only the the corkscrew is still produced.

Did Campy have a pizza cutter, also? I would have been all over a racket by them!

1984, Greensboro, NC...a Ferrari Testarossa pulled up to Cycles d' Oro sporting Campagnolo wheels. We were told that each wheel cost $2000! In 1984!

I doubt I could have afforded a Campy racket; but, I think I would have tried! :)

lazya4
09-20-2010, 10:51 AM
coachrick
i don't know about the pizza cutter it wasn't listed in the cataloge scan i have. but it does seem like i remember one.

i think we are both safe not having to come up with the cash to buy a campy racket. after 10 years of looking, i have yet to see one! here is hoping we both find one tomorrow in a thrift store...ha

can you tell me how to remove the pallet on a t2000? i want to reduce the hairpin down to make a junior racket. thanks

coachrick
09-20-2010, 01:29 PM
coachrick
i don't know about the pizza cutter it wasn't listed in the cataloge scan i have. but it does seem like i remember one.

i think we are both safe not having to come up with the cash to buy a campy racket. after 10 years of looking, i have yet to see one! here is hoping we both find one tomorrow in a thrift store...ha



can you tell me how to remove the pallet on a t2000? i want to reduce the hairpin down to make a junior racket. thanks

Good news and bad news...Good: Removing the pallet is fairly easy. Bad: Unless you are a metal worker, cutting the 'brace' off the bottom of the hairpin and repositioning it will be a challenge.

To remove the pallet for this purpose, unlace the treble string at the top of the pallet. Easy to cut it off but it should be replaced with something similar or at least finishing tape. Gently pry the pallet loose along the length of the handle. The adhesive applied back in the '60s, '70s. '80s is likely to be brittle...a little heat might help. IF the sticker is intact on the butt cap, you can allow the pallet to 'butterfly' away from the hairpin and the sticker can stay on. Otherwise, it may be easier to slice the sticker with a razor rather than trying to peel it off.

IF the pallet stays in two pieces, cleaning off the adhesive will aid in the replacement process. I would use Shoe Goo or similar adhesive that will not become brittle.

In the mean time, you had to cut or grind off the hairpin to the desired length. I still believe the big challenge will be bracing the bottom of the hairpin after you remove the original welded spacer block.

By the way, the smaller sized pallets(IF you were trying to reduce the grip size) are progressively 'flatter' as they get smaller, since the hairpin is of a fixed width. Best of luck!

BTW.2, Park Tools has a pizza cutter. It's no Campy, but it's affordable!
http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=88&item=PZT-2

lazya4
09-20-2010, 08:41 PM
coachrick
thanks for the great info. i don't know why i didn't think there would be brace at the bottom. looks like i am in luck though. i just got what appears to be a wilson t2000 junior racket off the bay. the grip size is 3 7/8" and the length is 26". sure beats me trying to cut down a 4 1/4" to 26". we will see for sure when it gets here.

thanks for the link on the pizza cutter too.

jimbo333
09-21-2010, 04:52 AM
coachrick
thanks for the great info. i don't know why i didn't think there would be brace at the bottom. looks like i am in luck though. i just got what appears to be a wilson t2000 junior racket off the bay. the grip size is 3 7/8" and the length is 26". sure beats me trying to cut down a 4 1/4" to 26". we will see for sure when it gets here.

thanks for the link on the pizza cutter too.

Yes, there were Junior versions of the T2000, I have one somewhere!

coachrick
09-21-2010, 07:25 AM
Yes, there were Junior versions of the T2000, I have one somewhere!

Wow! another one slipped by me!

Poor kids :) .

lazya4
09-21-2010, 07:45 AM
jimbo333
reading your post of your first encounter with the t2000 reminded me of my granddaughters response. i have some very nice junior wood rackets but when she saw the t2000 her eyes did sparkle.

jimbo333
09-21-2010, 05:34 PM
Wow! another one slipped by me!

Poor kids :) .

They are rare I think, and this example not surprisingly didn't look very well used! In fact finding a T2000 in general well used is harder than finding a Mint version LOL:)

jimbo333
09-21-2010, 05:38 PM
jimbo333
reading your post of your first encounter with the t2000 reminded me of my granddaughters response. i have some very nice junior wood rackets but when she saw the t2000 her eyes did sparkle.

I hate to say it, but she'll be better off with the wood racquet rather than T2000:(

But definitely best she at least tries the junior T2000, and yes I still think it's the best looking frame ever made, a total design classic:)

lazya4
09-21-2010, 05:55 PM
jimbo333
i couldn't agree with you more. but if she actually plays more with the t2000 it will sure teach her to hit the ball in the sweet spot. might be worth it to get a throat bridge welded in, make it a junior t3000.

T21D
09-28-2010, 02:18 PM
Loving this thread which brings me back during my junior high days. I thought I was the shizzle when I used my old man's T-5000 because he had that extra vibration damper on the butt of his grip compared to my T-3000. I really didn't feel any difference till I tried my moms AMF Head pro ( ooh soo light ) Then, my old man upgraded to a PDP (he was a big Roscoe Tanner fan).

rodracquet
10-06-2010, 12:37 AM
Metal racquets was going to be my thing when I started collecting, but the number of offerings simply became to great.

Not many classic racquet lovers will know that the first metal racquets started as early as 1887 according to Jeanne Cherry P44. The Metal Racquet Corp. based in Scotland may have had a tough time convincing the market. See what might have been had a Jimmy Connors character promoted the heck out of them back then.

The Birmal (1920's) doesn't really look out of place right alongside the racquets being made in the 1970's. The Dayton racquets, most people know of were one of the longest surviving companies from the mid 1920's to the mid 1980's making much the same product year in and out including the wood scored grip.

The following racquet was from a company called HOBBIES and is similar to the Birmal with an all metal frame and a cord grip.

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/OTHER%20RACQUETS/1hobbies.jpg

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/OTHER%20RACQUETS/2hobbies.jpg

The other interesting development in metal was the one piece moulding solution adopted by PRO AM in the mid 1970's.

In Australia, a backyarder specialist started making racquets in Carbon Steel (Wilson T 2000) then switched into Stainless steel. The result was huge flex with a loose stringing pattern for power and control. One was sent to Jimmy Connors for a test so if anyone can complete the story from Jimmy's end please advise.

They started as all silver finish then went oversize and powder coated.

Very hard to find, this one is a NOS made from components found in storage.

Also have a black variation.

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/OTHER%20RACQUETS/P1160814.jpg

Other metal and metal head wood shaft combinations of note are:

Steel
* McGregor Tourney (twin metal golf shafts) with wood head.
* Slazenger Twin shaft
* Dunlop Monoshaft (sister to the Slazenger and same factory)
* Samuel Fox the Silver Fox (stainless steel head wood shaft) assume 1950's maybe earlier.
* Slazenger Plus
* Wilson T5000 with rubber vibration dampner
* Wilson C1 for the super flat finish
* Tretorn removable string set

Aluminium
* Seamco with all grommets on an inside rail so the outside is clean of strings
* Yonex 8500 Green just looked so much cooler
* Pro Am for being one piece
* Wilson Sting for the unusual stringing
* John Mott (UK) for one of the best engineered metal racquets in terms of build quality.

No doubt a few more will come to mind once I click submit.

Virginia
10-07-2010, 08:12 PM
It looks like you're working your way through all the threads, Rod! :)

I have a few of the above listed frames in my collection too.

aerogami
10-16-2010, 12:48 AM
Metal racquets was going to be my thing when I started collecting, but the number of offerings simply became to great......

......Aluminium
* Seamco with all grommets on an inside rail so the outside is clean of strings
* Yonex 8500 Green just looked so much cooler
* Pro Am for being one piece
* Wilson Sting for the unusual stringing
* John Mott (UK) for one of the best engineered metal racquets in terms of build quality.

No doubt a few more will come to mind once I click submit.

This thread has inspired me to finally organize and catalog my giant mess of a racquet collection. I mostly like to collect wood and graphite, but I think I still have maybe a dozen metal racquets in my pile - some sillier than others - I'll try to post them up here over the next few days.

Here's a pic of my ProAm - with original cover that is too 70s sweet for words. I need to throw some poly on this boy and give it a good hit.

http://www.drivehq.com/file/df.aspx/publish/aerogami/TennisRacquets/ProAm01.jpg

aerogami
10-16-2010, 01:18 AM
Aluminium
* Seamco with all grommets on an inside rail so the outside is clean of strings
* Yonex 8500 Green just looked so much cooler
* Pro Am for being one piece
* Wilson Sting for the unusual stringing
* John Mott (UK) for one of the best engineered metal racquets in terms of build quality.

No doubt a few more will come to mind once I click submit.

Here's my Yonex 8600 Green OPS (Oval Pressed Shaft) circa around 1979, strung with some ugly orange string - sorry about the color balance in the image - bad lighting. The wooden palette is a trip.....

http://www.drivehq.com/file/df.aspx/publish/aerogami/TennisRacquets/YonexOPS.jpg

aerogami
10-19-2010, 06:59 PM
My Head Professional - missing the adhesive "HEAD" badge. I still give this one a hit every now and then...

http://www.drivehq.com/file/df.aspx/publish/aerogami/TennisRacquets/Head Aluminum 01.jpg[/QUOTE]

aerogami
10-19-2010, 07:05 PM
2 T-3000s with sweet, nerdy aftermarket covers...

http://www.drivehq.com/file/df.aspx/publish/aerogami/TennisRacquets/T_3000s.jpg[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]

aerogami
10-19-2010, 07:15 PM
TG&Y Stores racquet - This is some unmarked "cheapy" racquet with a TG&Y stores sticker on it - as if it was made for them - the thing is, it plays great and only weighs 11.9 oz strung - with poly on it, it gets ridiculous topspin, its very flexy - I'd love to get another of these racquets - but I don't recognise the make and the brand/model sticker has fallen off (or was never on it to begin with).... Anyone recognize this bridge design?


http://www.drivehq.com/file/df.aspx/publish/aerogami/TennisRacquets/MysteryRacquet.jpg[/QUOTE][/QUOTE][/QUOTE]

jimbo333
10-20-2010, 10:40 AM
Thanks very much to Rod and Aerogami for the recent photos, superb stuff:)

I'm really happy that this thread turned out so popular, in the end it was my most popular thread, and my personal favourite!

When I started collecting rackets 3 years ago, I started with metal rackets, and they are still my favourites after all this time:)

Oh and Aerogami, if that "ProAm" cover ever needs a new home please let me know, I'd really like one of those to go with my racket, it just looks really great!

And thanks to all who have posted in this thread, long live metal rackets:)

bugeyed
10-23-2010, 02:08 PM
That was the T4000 (which had a ball thingie on the end) and T5000 (which had a protruding rubber stalk), I believe. I'd guess those are pretty rare.

Yeah, I had a T-4000. It had a plastic dome over the rubber dampener at the butt cap.

Cheers,
kev

ritton07
11-26-2010, 04:08 PM
...another quite old metal addition, in case it was interesting....,

I found it recently, anyone knows about this Dunlop one? (70s?)

...I bet no pros ever used it (....!), but I don't know it, of course,
(is it really a...tennis racquet ? :shock:)


http://i858.photobucket.com/albums/ab146/ritton07/Dunlop.jpg

MAXXply
11-26-2010, 07:03 PM
I've seen a few John Newcombe Rawlings steel rackets as well as ACRO Newcombe aluminiums from the same era...
Were Rawlings and ACRO related? Which stick came first in Newcombe's career - the Rawlings Tie-Breaker or the ACRO ?

coachrick
11-26-2010, 09:35 PM
...another quite old metal addition, in case it was interesting....,

I found it recently, anyone knows about this Dunlop one? (70s?)

...I bet no pros ever used it (....!), but I don't know it, of course,
(is it really a...tennis racquet ? :shock:)


http://i858.photobucket.com/albums/ab146/ritton07/Dunlop.jpg

We sold a couple of those in the early-ish '70s. As you can imagine, it twisted like crazy at the slightest hint of an off-center hit. Does anyone remember Betty Stove playing with this stick?(I might be dreaming :) ).

rodracquet
03-03-2011, 09:02 PM
The metal racquets are really good to look at, so I am glad they were made and finally ovetaken by materials which didn't ruin your elbow. I think that tennis elbow must be lower than ever before thanks to the new materials, but that is another thread.

Thought I would share with you this proto-type that arrived ex France and found on hard rubbish tip. It arrived in an ALLO (french aluminium auto company that also made wood racquets from early 1900's) It isn't branded, arrived without a grip and is loosely strung. I polished it up and my stringer had a extra long grip which worked.

Like the Pro-AM this is solid cast but the detail in the casting is truly amazing down to the curved string holes and indented frame to protect the strings.

Never seen another which would be circa 1945.

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/P1090227.jpg

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/CopyofP1090265.jpg

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/CopyofP1090270.jpg

rodracquet
03-03-2011, 09:04 PM
Also, re the BIRMAL ALUMINIUM Grips. Can anyone please point me in the direction of where to find a cord grip that would look authentic. I have photos of an example and I note they came with leather grips also, but just trying to explore the cricket, golf restoration worlds where cord was used quite often. Happy for any advice.

rodracquet
03-03-2011, 09:10 PM
Here some other racquets that have a metal component.

The Dunlop Mono shaft seen earlier in the thread as new is great, the Slazenger twin shaft (same factory) and the MacGregor Tourney.

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/P1090298.jpg


Then we have the Samuel Fox wood stainless steel racquet with dodgy patent numbers. Used to be an umbrella maker, so guess this is a very early Stainless Steel version as opposed to the Carbon Steel variety.

http://i519.photobucket.com/albums/u354/tennishistory/p1070262aaa.jpg

dataseviltwin
03-07-2011, 07:15 AM
More photos of the metal Head - Final (String-Lock):)

http://i41.tinypic.com/2dv8rw5.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/qnwowh.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/5d2zw0.jpg

Realise I've posted these before, but it's such a great racquet!

Wery kewl. B-)

TMR
06-02-2012, 10:46 PM
How about the Cortland Metal Racquets with a smooth exterior and loop on the inside:

http://imgur.com/a/VETIa

jimbo333
02-13-2013, 05:44 PM
Here it is:)

There is just something about metal rackets I really like!

Hannah19
02-14-2013, 12:48 AM
Here it is:)

There is just something about metal rackets I really like!

Looks wise I'd say yes, some have the X factor such as the Prince and Wimbledon Magnesium, Garcia Titanium and even the ProKennex CU 31.
Not to mention the ancient Dayton's and T2000's.
But play wise I cannot be as enthousiastic ....:)

joe sch
02-14-2013, 05:06 AM
How about the Cortland Metal Racquets with a smooth exterior and loop on the inside:

http://imgur.com/a/VETIa

A better method than the t2000 loops which make stringing very difficult. I would surely use some plastic tubes since those tubes tend to oxidize which is abrasive to the looped string.

joe sch
02-14-2013, 05:07 AM
Looks wise I'd say yes, some have the X factor such as the Prince and Wimbledon Magnesium, Garcia Titanium and even the ProKennex CU 31.
Not to mention the ancient Dayton's and T2000's.
But play wise I cannot be as enthousiastic ....:)

I concur.
I should have included a dayton in my showing.
Maybe worth another shoot since I have about a dozen different dayton steel models ?

jimbo333
04-05-2013, 03:35 AM
Thought I should add these photos to this thread.

Here are some photos of my John Mott metal racquets. They were hand made in Farnham, Surrey in the UK.
These 2 are the Silver Shadow and the Camargue, named after a couple of 1980's Rolls Royce cars. Amazing looking metal tennis racquets!

http://i46.tinypic.com/vr3ksx.jpg

http://i48.tinypic.com/2weaoif.jpg

http://i47.tinypic.com/2v99nom.jpg

rodracquet
04-06-2013, 05:32 PM
Speaking of Daytons I found a rough example of the Wilson Indestructo circa 1929 featuring an all steel head/shaft/handle and a Cork grip. The butt cap is all steel and so are the strings.... see a gallery at


http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151573005798534&set=a.10151573005393534.1073741841.195175473533&type=1&theater

jimbo333
04-15-2013, 04:29 PM
Speaking of Daytons I found a rough example of the Wilson Indestructo circa 1929 featuring an all steel head/shaft/handle and a Cork grip. The butt cap is all steel and so are the strings.... see a gallery at


http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151573005798534&set=a.10151573005393534.1073741841.195175473533&type=1&theater

Excellent, I thought I had one of these, but when I last looked I couldn't find it. Will have another look next weekend!

jimbo333
04-15-2013, 04:31 PM
Thought I would add these photos of these great looking metal presses to this thread, as they are sort of relavant to it!

http://i49.tinypic.com/xqkuv8.jpg

http://i49.tinypic.com/2dtoks8.jpg

http://i48.tinypic.com/dpvgcy.jpg

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=460304

Sanglier
06-09-2013, 12:43 AM
I think this thread could benefit from some acknowledgement of the actual people who made those Head, PDP, Prince, Adidas, Le Coq Sportif aluminum frames through the better part of the '70s.

The similarities between the butt-cap stickers of these racquets are impossible to miss. They all list the same three patent numbers.

The inventers responsible for these patents are George Vaughn and Richard Hargrave of Maark Corporation, located just outside the city of Princeton. The racquet illustrated in the patent drawings looks very much like the PDP Open/Adidas 660 (which differ from one another in a couple of minor but non-trivial details). Vaughn and Hargrave also held a design patent for the throat piece on the original Prince "Classic" (as a result, the only patent out of the five listed on the Prince butt-cap that didn't come from these two men was the infamous 3,999,756 from Howard Head).

I've read here and elsewhere that early Head and Prince aluminum racquets were made in Colorado, but I wasn't able to find any reference of a Maark manufacturing facility outside of New Jersey. In fact, Maark Corp was so low-key that there was precious little written about it anywhere. The only solid piece of information I found was this short article in the Princeton alumni newsletter (Vaughn and Hargrave were classmates). The article focuses on another alumnus who was in charge of Prince Manufacturing at the time, but the section I highlighted is the most interesting part, I think.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v15/sanglier/MaarkCorporation_zps737b4e6c.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/sanglier/media/MaarkCorporation_zps737b4e6c.jpg.html)


As one can see, Maark Corporation was the 'Kunnan Industry' of Princeton for a number of years, until Head bought them. Subsequent to the acquisition, Vaughn became the chairman of AMF Head Racquet Sports. By then, graphite technology was already nipping at the heels of the aluminum juggernaut, and 'Made in USA' tennis racquets were rushing inexorably towards the endangered species list...

In retirement, George Vaughn continues to sit on the board of trustees at Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology, a school co-founded by his namesake father, also a Princeton alumnus, who was an ace fighter pilot during WW I (I wonder what he thought of his son's inventions :) )

As for PDP, the only short-lived brand out of the foursome above, I had a hunch that it was to Maark Corp what Pro Kennex was to Kunnan Industries, purely on the count of the close resemblance between the Open and the line drawings in Vaughn and Hargrave's patent applications. However, available evidence does not support this hypothesis, as PDP was apparently acquired by Le Coq Sportif in late 1980.

So Maark Corp probably never bothered to build a house brand (until they were absorbed by Head). They were perfectly happy to toil away in complete obscurity, allowing their OEM clients to bask unfettered in the glow of their technological success. There are many advantages to this business model, but the most obvious downside is that you don't get proper credit for what you've been able to accomplish.

Those Princetonians must not have suffered from insecurity issues much. :)

jimbo333
06-09-2013, 05:57 AM
^^^Brilliant post thanks Sanglier:)

I've noticed that some of my PDP, Le Coq Sportif and Adidas metal rackets were bascially exactly the same racket. But I didn't think to check the patent numbers!

This is great research, and very interesting to read, thanks again!

joe sch
06-10-2013, 05:55 AM
^^^Brilliant post thanks Sanglier:)

I've noticed that some of my PDP, Le Coq Sportif and Adidas metal rackets were bascially exactly the same racket. But I didn't think to check the patent numbers!

This is great research, and very interesting to read, thanks again!

Agree !

Sanglier posts would combine for an outstanding book on the transitional history of the modern tennis racket. Thanks for all you post.

Sanglier
06-10-2013, 12:34 PM
No book can ever hope to match the combined wisdom of this board! I have learned so much from all of you that it's fun to be able to give a little back every once a while.

I left out a speculation in the post above, because I don't have any hard evidence to back it up, but I think I'll toss it out there anyway:

I have a hunch that it was not by pure coincidence that Head bought Maark Corp in 1977, the year after Prince received the oversized head patent and launched the original 'Classic', OEMed by Maark. It's conceivable that AMF Head executives were alarmed by Prince's IP jackpot, and figured that if they had to pay Prince for every oversized racquet they sold, they would be in a much better negotiating position if they owned all those Maark. patents.This strategy might have worked out for them if the graphite revolution wasn't about to catch on!

joe sch
06-11-2013, 05:30 AM
No book can ever hope to match the combined wisdom of this board! I have learned so much from all of you that it's fun to be able to give a little back every once a while.

I left out a speculation in the post above, because I don't have any hard evidence to back it up, but I think I'll toss it out there anyway:

I have a hunch that it was not by pure coincidence that Head bought Maark Corp in 1977, the year after Prince received the oversized head patent and launched the original 'Classic', OEMed by Maark. It's conceivable that AMF Head executives were alarmed by Prince's IP jackpot, and figured that if they had to pay Prince for every oversized racquet they sold, they would be in a much better negotiating position if they owned all those Maark. patents.This strategy might have worked out for them if the graphite revolution wasn't about to catch on!

Very true about the combined knowledge of these boards.
Rumors, hunches, and speculation really help drive these threads. I think your right on regarding Head purchasing Maark Corp and the graphite revolution and transitions is the history.

Luis Babboni
07-16-2013, 09:44 AM
Some close-ups of the Slazenger X10, made of Tensilium:)

http://i44.tinypic.com/2dqv9lj.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/105p6v4.jpg

Is this the one that whistle while you move it acroos air?

PrinceMoron
07-21-2013, 01:39 AM
Tensilium was trademarked in 75

http://www.trademarkuk.info/tm/1055628/tensilium

CaptainCool309
08-13-2013, 12:52 PM
My Dad and Aunt really loved the Wilson Metal T-Series Racquets. He gave me his T5000 and Tx6000 to play with when I was a little boy and I learned how to play the game with those racquets. Even today with all the modern racquets around...I still love hitting with those Beautiful metal racquets :)

A friend of mine asked if the T5000 was a Badminton racquet, because he didn't understand how you could hit a tennis ball consistently with that small of a head frame lol.
http://i1346.photobucket.com/albums/p689/CaptainCool309/DSCN0926_zps0625ff8f.jpg

I don't see many Tx6000's around? Does anyone else have one?
http://i1346.photobucket.com/albums/p689/CaptainCool309/DSCN0927_zps2a2c1b2d.jpg

vintagefan
08-14-2013, 03:55 AM
Are metal frames arm friendly or not?

joe sch
08-14-2013, 05:25 AM
Are metal frames arm friendly or not?

Not. They have flex but do not dampen vibration. When they were hitting the market, many of the pros switched for the power and then switched back after developing arm problems. Rod Laver is a classic example of that story.

Sanglier
06-11-2014, 10:31 PM
I thought I'd add a few more chromies to this thread. Nothing spectacular, but interesting nonetheless.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v15/sanglier/Metals_zps18a3e338.jpg~original


The one on the left is a Revere product, with not one, not two, but three whole names to itself: Sheffield - Ringer - Clark Graebner Model. Revere was incorporated in 1968 to make metal racquets sold under several different brands (including "Bobby Riggs"). I strongly suspect that Garcia's metal frames of the period were also made by Revere. Not only were these two New Jersey companies close neighbors (less than 15 minutes apart by car), but Garcia's flagship "X-15" model was a clone of an earlier Revere frame, which carried the exact same model designation! The trinominal creation above never appeared in any of the Revere magazine ads, of which there were many, but it appears to be nothing more than the original Graebner-endorsed Sheffield model updated with a tiny leaf spring welded to the throat. For my taste, it is probably one of the homeliest of the chromies.

In contrast, the Slazenger Plus in the middle is nothing short of drop dead gorgeous. If there had been a contest for the most attractive metal frame ever made, I would have nominated this beauty. Kuebler suggests that the Plus was released in 1974, but it had in fact shown up in magazine ads by as early as 1972.

The one on the right is the earliest house-branded Kunnan frame I was able to find that wasn't made out of wood. Kunnan is said to have begun making metal racquets in 1973, while California records show that his associate Harvey Chung had formed the Kennex Sports Corporation in October 1974, presumably to market Kunnan's house-brand in the US. If these dates are accurate, then the "Kennedy" chromie above could only have been made during that one year period between '73 and '74. As aluminum was rapidly closing the door on the chrome era by then, and the composite revolution was right around the corner, it's actually a little surprising that Kunnan would have chosen to attack the US market using such an obsolescent design. It closely resembles the more common Regent Budge, but has a smaller head and is slightly longer overall.

----

BGod
06-20-2014, 10:27 PM
I was hitting with the T-4000 a few months ago at drop in.

Went 5-0......

My elbow hurt like hell though so I decided was not for me. I have no idea how Connors used one his career.