PDA

View Full Version : Are there tennis scholarships for Masters student ?


Tdot
04-14-2010, 10:20 PM
I'm a recent college graduate and I will probably be looking for a job and end up working in the big world in the next few years. After that, I do have plans to come back to school and earn a masters degree.

Are tennis scholarships available to Masters students ?

duusoo
04-15-2010, 04:31 AM
I'm a recent college graduate and I will probably be looking for a job and end up working in the big world in the next few years. After that, I do have plans to come back to school and earn a masters degree. It's called a graduate assistant position. Most schools have them, and few apply. It's a great way to get a free degree.

Are tennis scholarships available to Masters students ? It's called a graduate assistant. Most D1 programs have 2 spots, its a great way to obtain a free education.

HunterST
04-15-2010, 09:12 AM
Really?? You don't have to be an undergrad to play on a collegiate tennis team? That seems unlikely to me. Otherwise you'd have a lot of 24-26 year olds playing, wouldn't you?

andfor
04-15-2010, 06:29 PM
Really?? You don't have to be an undergrad to play on a collegiate tennis team? That seems unlikely to me. Otherwise you'd have a lot of 24-26 year olds playing, wouldn't you?

Are you an American or foreign?

A graduate assistant is an assistant to the coach. Not a athlete. They may take on the role as hitting partner, stringer, equipment manger, recruiter, ball feeder, on court coach during matches, etc. Often the programs who have grad assistants are looking for hitting/practice partners who are strong players.

If you already have a college degree and are looking to start your intercollegiate tennis career as a masters degree student you will have missed the boat at a D1 school. You may be able to play for 1 or 2 years if you are a grad student at a D2 or NAIA school. I'm not sure so check with the coach.......Be prepared for him to ask you why you are just now interested in playing college tennis as a grad student.

Good luck

stanfordtennis alum
04-16-2010, 09:23 AM
yes, you can be on scholarship and be a master's student

Kick_It
04-16-2010, 10:09 AM
Theoretically possible though not commonly seen in practice.
AFAIK (I could be wrong) it boils down to eligibility where the most common bugaboos are:
1) Already used up 4 years of eligibility as undergrad
2) Accepted prize money or don't meet amateur status requirements

As others have said grad assistant is a good gig. nearly all the GA's I've seen at D1 schools has already been successful D1 players.

I've also seen some successful former touring pros either serve as an assistant coach or volunteer as such - but they aren't grad students.

duusoo
04-17-2010, 07:43 AM
Theoretically possible though not commonly seen in practice.
AFAIK (I could be wrong) it boils down to eligibility where the most common bugaboos are:
1) Already used up 4 years of eligibility as undergrad
2) Accepted prize money or don't meet amateur status requirements

As others have said grad assistant is a good gig. nearly all the GA's I've seen at D1 schools has already been successful D1 players.

I've also seen some successful former touring pros either serve as an assistant coach or volunteer as such - but they aren't grad students.I don't think so. I believe once you have graduated, received the diploma, it's over. Now, if your were a red shirt, that is different,, or if you are in an accelerated program in medicine or law. because your 4th yr. is actually your first in law school or medical school, and technically you need to have a degree to be admitted. When I was playing we had a player who was in graduate school in engineering, but had played 3 yrs, and hadn't graduated, some type of program where he was on the fast track to his PhD.

EP1998
04-17-2010, 11:24 AM
An option is to be a graduate assistant to a team. You are basically an assistant coach with a small salary and get a break on tuition. These jobs are usually available through connections/word of mouth. It helps if you know some coaches. You have to know how to string because that is usually what you get stuck doing. If you want to get into college coaching yourself this is the way to go.

If you can't get a paid gig there is the volunteer option.

Kick_It
04-18-2010, 08:30 AM
I don't think so. I believe once you have graduated, received the diploma, it's over. Now, if your were a red shirt, that is different,, or if you are in an accelerated program in medicine or law. because your 4th yr. is actually your first in law school or medical school, and technically you need to have a degree to be admitted. When I was playing we had a player who was in graduate school in engineering, but had played 3 yrs, and hadn't graduated, some type of program where he was on the fast track to his PhD.

You could be correct. I've never seen it happen - but I thought the top criteria was you have 4 years of eligibility. Following your example apparently the only reason that worked was though he hadn't graduated - but was still in a graduate program...

Anyways - fundamentally graduates playing in D1 tennis are uncommon, and scholarships for them are even less common.

I've seen scholarship basketball athletes do it - and graduate in 3 years or so, or be out for a redshirt year due to injuries, graduate in 4 years, and still have a scholarship to finish their eligibility. But perhaps tennis is different...

andfor
04-23-2010, 05:47 AM
http://www.ncaa.org/wps/portal/ncaahome?WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/wps/wcm/connect/ncaa/NCAA/Legislation%20and%20Governance/Eligibility%20and%20Recruiting/Faqs/eligibility_seasons.html