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View Full Version : Weaving 4-5 crosses ahead?


CrispyFritters
04-30-2010, 10:12 PM
I've recently tried weaving 4-5 cross ahead, leaving a loop at the end of each row and then tensioning those 4-5 strings one at a time. I've found this to be faster overall, and it helps pace me...since I know I'll be done stringing after a few "chunks" of crosses.

Does anyone else do this? Any potential negatives doing is this way?

tennis_pr0
04-30-2010, 10:17 PM
I've never done this, but I think I might try. I don't see how it could harm anything...

David123
04-30-2010, 10:25 PM
hmm i thought bout doing this but never really did it. I'll give it a try next time i string.

Ambivalent
04-30-2010, 11:24 PM
I don't think there are any consequences other than a major setback if you don't leave enough string in the first few loops. Trying to pull more string through 3-4 weaves is painful.

baek57
05-01-2010, 12:45 AM
You will encounter a hard weave if you string more than 1 ahead.

drakulie
05-01-2010, 04:54 AM
I do this on all synthetics. I find it to be quicker and it gets the string off the floor. I also weave a few ahead on the mains.

AirK
05-01-2010, 07:14 AM
You will encounter a hard weave if you string more than 1 ahead.

I dont see how...

pvaudio
05-01-2010, 07:21 AM
You will encounter a hard weave if you string more than 1 ahead.No, you won't. It's not possible to do so unless you're considering the "bowing" of the mains. Still then, it's not called a hard weave. Either way, I don't do the "pushing" motion that Yulitle does (my fingers are too greasy :? ) and instead do a sewing machine motion (not a sewing needle, note the difference) where I align myself with the mains and pass the cross between my fingers as I go across. Doesn't really change the speed for me for hard weaving anyway.

pvaudio
05-01-2010, 07:22 AM
I don't think there are any consequences other than a major setback if you don't leave enough string in the first few loops. Trying to pull more string through 3-4 weaves is painful.
That's the only disadvantage I'm thinking.

Power Player
05-01-2010, 09:19 AM
Im going to try this next time. Crosses take most of my time. Plus I hybrid SG in the crosses, so it should work out well.

mikeler
05-01-2010, 09:42 AM
I've done this before but I still prefer to just weave one ahead.

David123
05-01-2010, 10:10 AM
You will encounter a hard weave if you string more than 1 ahead.

How will you encounter a hard weave?

Dags
05-01-2010, 10:50 AM
I do wonder if some responses are interpreting the OP differently. Here's a reminder of what was written:
I've recently tried weaving 4-5 cross ahead, leaving a loop at the end of each row and then tensioning those 4-5 strings one at a time. I've found this to be faster overall, and it helps pace me...since I know I'll be done stringing after a few "chunks" of crosses.

Does anyone else do this? Any potential negatives doing is this way?
My understanding of this is that he weaves 4-5 crosses, tensions, weaves the next 4-5, tensions, and repeats until the end.

For illustration, I shall assume blocks of 5 crosses.

- The first 5 crosses will have no real hard weaves, as no tension is set on any cross.

- After tensioning cross 5, we are then back to weaving. The next cross (6) will be a hard weave, as will 8 and 10. All of these are weaving against the tension set on cross 5.

- Rinse and repeat for 11-15 and 16-18/19/20.

The only way I would consider something similar to this method is to pre-weave the first 5 crosses, then pull tension on the first 4. I would then weave cross 6 and continue to pull tension one at a time in the usual one-ahead method. The potential benefit, as pointed out above, is pre-weaving those first 5 crosses gets some slack off the floor. However, personally I would probably be quicker with a more standardised approach, as it allows me to build up a rhythm.

Valjean
05-02-2010, 04:07 AM
....Does anyone else do this? Any potential negatives doing is this way?
I've adopted this (and most other suggestions at one time). A problem then is how relatively inconvenient it becomes to move on to the next cross, unless you create a lot of cross string slack by "angling" those crosses first. Stringing so many seems to tighten things up a bit otherwise. I went back to stringing 2-3 rather quickly. Also, misweave any of the early ones and you've got a more significant "do-over" problem than I have.