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JackB1
05-03-2010, 01:55 PM
How long can I leave the racquet sitting on the stringer without doing any damage?

I am just starting out and iot takes me 2 hours right now. It would be nice to be able to take a break after the mains are done, before starting the crosses. Would it be OK to leave the racquet sitting on the stringer with just the mains for 1/2 hour? one hour?

thanks

Tennis_Man
05-03-2010, 02:00 PM
You shouldn't leave it alone for that long. I wouldnt leave it alone for more than 20-30mins especially since you have not started the cross yet. It will definitely deform the racket. if this happens i would recommend cutting the strings to prevent further damage. Basically when you start you need to finish without any break longer than 20 mins.

Bud
05-03-2010, 02:23 PM
How long can I leave the racquet sitting on the stringer without doing any damage?

I am just starting out and iot takes me 2 hours right now. It would be nice to be able to take a break after the mains are done, before starting the crosses. Would it be OK to leave the racquet sitting on the stringer with just the mains for 1/2 hour? one hour?

thanks

Are you serious?

You can leave it on the stringer for as long as you need. There is little damaging force on the frame with all the braces and supports.

It's good to finish it as soon as possible,however, so the stringbed stiffness is somewhat consistent.

You shouldn't leave it alone for that long. I wouldnt leave it alone for more than 20-30mins especially since you have not started the cross yet. It will definitely deform the racket. if this happens i would recommend cutting the strings to prevent further damage. Basically when you start you need to finish without any break longer than 20 mins.

Completely not true.

Ambivalent
05-03-2010, 02:58 PM
Are you serious?

You can leave it on the stringer for as long as you need. There is little damaging force on the frame with all the braces and supports.

It's good to finish it as soon as possible,however, so the stringbed stiffness is somewhat consistent.



Completely not true.

Depends on the machine. On a 2pt mount klippermate there is basically no support. Even on a 6 pt mount, parts of the frame are still receiving unnecessary stress. I think the faster you take it off, the better.

JackB1
05-03-2010, 08:56 PM
Depends on the machine. On a 2pt mount klippermate there is basically no support. Even on a 6 pt mount, parts of the frame are still receiving unnecessary stress. I think the faster you take it off, the better.

I am talking about a SP Swing, which is basically a 2 pt mount system. Since it would be "sitting" with just the mains intact, wouldn't those 2 end mounts keep the frame somewhat from any damage to the frame? You can see the way it mounts on page 6 of the manual: http://www.sptennis.com/manuals/Swing.pdf

sstchur
05-03-2010, 09:05 PM
I am talking about a SP Swing, which is basically a 2 pt mount system. Since it would be "sitting" with just the mains intact, wouldn't those 2 end mounts keep the frame somewhat from any damage to the frame?

I am no expert on this issue, so take my words here with a grain of salt. I'm sure there will probably be many who refute what I say, but this is my take:

It's the pulling tension that REALLY puts stress on the frame. Merely mounting the frame shouldn't really be putting much (if any) stress on the frame. I think this is especially true of suspension mount systems. And If you watch yulitle's video on 6 point mounting, he indicates that the supports should be "just barely" touching the racquet, as the point is the keep the frame from going out, not to "push the frame in."

It seems to me that merely having a racquet mounted shouldn't put much stress on it at all. Maybe a little bit with some of the two point press down systems, but even then, if you aren't over-tightening, I don't think there is much stress on the frame just from mounting.

That said, there is tremendous stress being exerted on the frame during tensioning. That much is for sure. This is why the frame needs to be securely mounted.

If you've done the mains, then you've tensioned in one direction, and there is forced being applied to the frame for sure. At the point when the mains are done and the crosses haven't been started, the frame may have actually narrowed (or elongated) a bit. This is normal and once the crosses are done -- assuming you haven't changed the tension between M and X too much -- it should even out in the end.

Is it bad to leave the mains sitting for a long time before doing the crosses? Eh... it's probably not as bad as some might have you believe. But then again, I wouldn't recommend leaving it sit for an "extended" period of time that way. 30 minutes probably isn't the end of the world though.

But again, take my words with a grain of salt, because, to be brutally honest, I have no idea what the hell I'm talking about, and I'm basically just giving my best guess! ;-)

JackB1
05-04-2010, 06:26 AM
I am no expert on this issue, so take my words here with a grain of salt. I'm sure there will probably be many who refute what I say, but this is my take:

It's the pulling tension that REALLY puts stress on the frame. Merely mounting the frame shouldn't really be putting much (if any) stress on the frame. I think this is especially true of suspension mount systems. And If you watch yulitle's video on 6 point mounting, he indicates that the supports should be "just barely" touching the racquet, as the point is the keep the frame from going out, not to "push the frame in."

It seems to me that merely having a racquet mounted shouldn't put much stress on it at all. Maybe a little bit with some of the two point press down systems, but even then, if you aren't over-tightening, I don't think there is much stress on the frame just from mounting.

That said, there is tremendous stress being exerted on the frame during tensioning. That much is for sure. This is why the frame needs to be securely mounted.

If you've done the mains, then you've tensioned in one direction, and there is forced being applied to the frame for sure. At the point when the mains are done and the crosses haven't been started, the frame may have actually narrowed (or elongated) a bit. This is normal and once the crosses are done -- assuming you haven't changed the tension between M and X too much -- it should even out in the end.

Is it bad to leave the mains sitting for a long time before doing the crosses? Eh... it's probably not as bad as some might have you believe. But then again, I wouldn't recommend leaving it sit for an "extended" period of time that way. 30 minutes probably isn't the end of the world though.

But again, take my words with a grain of salt, because, to be brutally honest, I have no idea what the hell I'm talking about, and I'm basically just giving my best guess! ;-)

I am just trying to make stringing a little less painful right now. It's taking me 2 hours and I think if I take a little break in between, it will make it more tolerable.

drakulie
05-04-2010, 06:33 AM
With how well frames are made these days, and the better mounting systems, I don't think it's too big of a deal leaving the machine on there for a short period of time. However, I don't practice this. If you are going to string a frame, you should make sure you are going to have time to finish it.

As others have noted, a frame goes thru a lof of stress during the stringing process, and completing only the mains, regardless of the mounting or how well built frames are, it is still distorted.

ronninmaster
05-04-2010, 07:02 AM
It will not really ruin your racket as long it's in the stringer b/c of the mounts. However it will lead to inconsistent tension, which is why most stringers do it as quickly as possible not only because it is in high expectations when at tourneys, but also for tension consistency. A racket strung at 60lbs will lose tension little by little. I learned this first hand at the shop while stringing on a babolat sensor. I tensioned the string but forgot to clamp off when a customer asked me a question. I came back 5 mins later the tensioner reached the end where it couldn't pull anymore and the readout came went to 57 lbs. This would be the same for the clamps. Esp extruded polys, which have less tension stability, once the strings are clamped down they will still continue stretching until they are completely useless. This is why luxilon and other poly strings go dead faster than a multifilament or nat gut.

PimpMyGame
05-04-2010, 07:06 AM
I only leave my racket on the machine long enough to grab myself another cold beer.

Seriously, I don't think there is one tennis shop in the world where a sales assistant won't greet a customer and help with a purchase just because he's in the middle of a string job. A 30 minute break would be fine IMO.

tennis005
05-04-2010, 07:32 AM
^^^ Thats why I'm getting a stringing machine. Our local stringer just leaves the racket half done and sitting on the machine. Then if you tell him a tension, he will just string it at whatever he feels like stringing it at.

ronninmaster
05-04-2010, 07:35 AM
^^^ Thats why I'm getting a stringing machine. Our local stringer just leaves the racket half done and sitting on the machine. Then if you tell him a tension, he will just string it at whatever he feels like stringing it at.
hey I don't do that. I saw the tension fall I let go of the string and retension it. And after the first time I never leave the racket until its done. I finish a racket around 16 mins

TenniseaWilliams
05-04-2010, 08:36 AM
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/194/3264394806_a9bd7e9a13.jpg

SpinDog
05-04-2010, 09:02 AM
^^^^ Needs a spidy dampener
http://www.tennis-point.de/templates/tennispoint/images/produktbilder/0307050121000000/0307050121000000_500.jpg

TenniseaWilliams
05-04-2010, 10:04 AM
http://memegenerator.net/Question-Spiderman/ImageMacro/1016552/Question-Spiderman-How-do-I-not-finish-racquet-.jpg

^^^^ Needs a spidy dampener

Ambivalent
05-04-2010, 10:05 AM
I am talking about a SP Swing, which is basically a 2 pt mount system. Since it would be "sitting" with just the mains intact, wouldn't those 2 end mounts keep the frame somewhat from any damage to the frame? You can see the way it mounts on page 6 of the manual: http://www.sptennis.com/manuals/Swing.pdf

Yes but just because there is a support doesn't mean there isn't stress. Basically, the strings are pulling the frame inward, and the clamps are holding it from doing so, creating 2 way torsion.

zapvor
05-04-2010, 10:07 AM
How long can I leave the racquet sitting on the stringer without doing any damage?

I am just starting out and iot takes me 2 hours right now. It would be nice to be able to take a break after the mains are done, before starting the crosses. Would it be OK to leave the racquet sitting on the stringer with just the mains for 1/2 hour? one hour?

thanks

my first job took 3 hrs. just be patient and have fun with it. i am down to 45min now. regardless of time do NOT let it sit. dont take breaks.

Irvin
05-04-2010, 10:43 AM
As long as the supports are not slipping I do not think you will have any problem. I do think it is best to complete the racket all in one session though but it olny takes me about 15 minutes to string the racket not counting removing string, mounting frame, etc...

Irvin

JackB1
05-04-2010, 11:24 AM
my first job took 3 hrs. just be patient and have fun with it. i am down to 45min now. regardless of time do NOT let it sit. dont take breaks.

How long did it take you to get down from 2 hours to one?

Irvin
05-04-2010, 11:34 AM
My first stringer was a TR Stringer and I never strung a racket with that stringer in under 60 minutes. My next stringer was a Prince 100 which is a floor model with plenty of room under the racket to work with the string. The first time I strung a racket on the Prince machine it took me about 30 minutes. The money you saved buying the low price machine is costing you your time. If you are willing to do that there is nothing wrong with it. If you want to string rackets in under an hour now buy a more user friendly stringer.

Irvin

Ambivalent
05-04-2010, 11:50 AM
How long did it take you to get down from 2 hours to one?

My first one took about 2.5 hours. From there the time drops rapidly. It also depends on strings. If you're doing polys, getting through blocked grommets isn't too bad. I've spent nearly 30 minutes on trying to get isospeed control through a blocked hole though...

I'd say after the 5th job i was doing consistent 1 hours on 18x20 rackets. This is with a 2 pt dropweight.

JackB1
05-04-2010, 12:54 PM
My first one took about 2.5 hours. From there the time drops rapidly. It also depends on strings. If you're doing polys, getting through blocked grommets isn't too bad. I've spent nearly 30 minutes on trying to get isospeed control through a blocked hole though...

I'd say after the 5th job i was doing consistent 1 hours on 18x20 rackets. This is with a 2 pt dropweight.

I've done 3 so far and I am still at 2 hours :(

I might try another tonite. Hopefully my time will go down.

Pwned
05-04-2010, 12:59 PM
Took me quite a while to get my times down. First one was like 2.5 hours. But now I can do them in about 35 minutes (just the stringing) if I try and go fast with something like PSGD. I don't think I am going to do it much faster with my gamma x-2. I usually take my time and do a leisurely hour.

Irvin
05-05-2010, 04:37 AM
I've done 3 so far and I am still at 2 hours :(

I might try another tonite. Hopefully my time will go down.

This may not be what you want to hear but maybe it will be helpful for those looking for a stringer. The SP Swing has very little room under the racket to work the string. The bar the racket supports is on is only a couple of inches below the racket. A stringer like the X-2 would have been a better choice. This stringer has support bars that hold the racket higher so you have room to work above and below the racket. This allows you to speed weave.

http://www.doittennis.com/images/md/gamma-x-2-stringing-machine.jpg

Irvin

zapvor
05-05-2010, 04:50 AM
How long did it take you to get down from 2 hours to one?

well it goes down pretty fast in the beginning. so like first one is 3hrs. 2nd time about 2.5, up to about 4 times. starting at the 5th job it went to like 2 hrs. then at 10jobs it goes down to about 1.5. by 20 i was doing 1hr, and now if i really need to rush 30min is doable, but i like to take my time and spend 45 per racket.

JackB1
05-05-2010, 06:38 AM
This may not be what you want to hear but maybe it will be helpful for those looking for a stringer. The SP Swing has very little room under the racket to work the string. The bar the racket supports is on is only a couple of inches below the racket. A stringer like the X-2 would have been a better choice. This stringer has support bars that hold the racket higher so you have room to work above and below the racket. This allows you to speed weave.

Irvin

You know, you are right. The SP Swing has NO ROOM under the racquet and I am always struggling to get under there. I also hate the clamps. The adjustment is a screw, so you have no concept of how to adjust them. You just have to keep doing it by trial and error. I heard the X-2 clamps have a dial, so you can tell where they are adjusted to. It also makes having both clamps identical much easier.

zapvor
05-05-2010, 08:54 AM
yea it helps if you have a nice machine. i have been lucky to use other people's machines which have been very nice.