PDA

View Full Version : breakage causes, responsibilities


mauricem
05-08-2010, 07:42 PM
I string for a few friends and club members at a fairly cheap price as I like to experiment with different strings for myself .

Strung an nvision with gosen polylon ice at 55 a couple of weeks ago the other day for a customer as they requested something very durable due to frequent string breakages when using polys

Saw them yesterday at the club and one of the mains m5 has broken about 1/2" from head, the trouble is they expect me to restring it again for free as they claim to have only used it for half an hour or so and it shouldnt have broken.

This is a young guy who hits pretty hard but he was adamant it broke after middling a mid pace shot. Couldn't see any clamp damage or nicks in the area of the break.

Theyve been good customers in the past but I hate stringing full poly jobs and dont consider the strings or my technique to have been at fault.

Any suggestions or guidelines as to determining what causes breakages at different parts of the frame? My understanding was a snapped string near the top of the frame is usually from a shank??

dekko1
05-09-2010, 12:22 AM
You are right, he broke the string from a shank, or by mishitting the ball. It's not your fault and you should not be doing it again for free, he needs to watch the ball!! Lots of players that use poly at my club break string this way and it also happens to me every now and again.

v205
05-09-2010, 01:59 AM
I hear this so often. Maybe put a disclaimer that string (poly) breakage near the frame is likely from a shank and not covered?

Never heard of a non-poly breaking from a shank though.

SteveI
05-09-2010, 02:12 AM
I string for a few friends and club members at a fairly cheap price as I like to experiment with different strings for myself .

Strung an nvision with gosen polylon ice at 55 a couple of weeks ago the other day for a customer as they requested something very durable due to frequent string breakages when using polys

Saw them yesterday at the club and one of the mains m5 has broken about 1/2" from head, the trouble is they expect me to restring it again for free as they claim to have only used it for half an hour or so and it shouldnt have broken.

This is a young guy who hits pretty hard but he was adamant it broke after middling a mid pace shot. Couldn't see any clamp damage or nicks in the area of the break.

Theyve been good customers in the past but I hate stringing full poly jobs and dont consider the strings or my technique to have been at fault.

Any suggestions or guidelines as to determining what causes breakages at different parts of the frame? My understanding was a snapped string near the top of the frame is usually from a shank??

I have used Gosen Polylon Ice 17 for a few years on and off and have strung it many times for others. This stuff is hard to break under normal playing conditions. The only time it ever broke.. was on a shank. Hard hitting junior.. big fast swings.. and full western FH. It is your call if you would like to replace. I might do it once and explain what has happened. In general, I do not help out in a "shank" break.

Irvin
05-09-2010, 05:35 AM
I string for a few friends and club members at a fairly cheap price...

There is your problem right there in the your face. When you provide a service for people and get paid you have responsibilities. You should charge what you think it will cost you to cover your costs, time, reputation, and responsibilities. Do what you think is fair. What you charged to begin with has no bearing on what you should do next.

Sorry if I sound too harsh.

Irvin

SteveI
05-09-2010, 05:55 AM
There is your problem right there in the your face. When you provide a service for people and get paid you have responsibilities. You should charge what you think it will cost you to cover your costs, time, reputation, and responsibilities. Do what you think is fair. What you charged to begin with has no bearing on what you should do next.

Sorry if I sound too harsh.

Irvin

Irvin,

Not too harsh. I also used to string for folks are a somewhat cheaper price that I should have.. but learned very quickly that you need to be more professional about your services and your reputation, and responsibilities. If you do not charge a decent rate folks may tend to not respect your work and still expect you to make good on any errors they proceive in your work. Better to charge a fair and decent rate and treat your time, energy and skill in a professional matter. If you do not.. the customers in some cases will not. Take yourself and your work serious.. and folks will trend to treat you the same. Saying said all that.. I would say no to the "shank". Tell him to hit the sweetspot more and the frame less...:-) Many good stringers/proshops will see the break was caused by a shank and not replace for NC.

Regards,
Steve

jim e
05-09-2010, 06:38 AM
There is your problem right there in the your face. When you provide a service for people and get paid you have responsibilities. You should charge what you think it will cost you to cover your costs, time, reputation, and responsibilities. Do what you think is fair. What you charged to begin with has no bearing on what you should do next.

Sorry if I sound too harsh.

Irvin

Irvin:
Very good and very true post!

Although it was a long time ago,I will always remember the 1st time that I increased my fees for stringing, as it was after someone brought back an all nat. gut job, and it broke very fast, so I restrung it at no fee, and later found out from someone else that the person picked up a stone and hit that, and the string snapped. Since I did not know that at the time, guess who swallowed the fee.? I'm sure that many other conditions occur that the stringer takes a beating, so this should be incorporated into the fee schedule.Its all part of overhead expenses.

frequent string breakages when using polys

one of the mains m5 has broken about 1/2" from head, My understanding was a snapped string near the top of the frame is usually from a shank??

Because of this statement, most likely he is a big shanker, and with many poly strings this will continue. Put something more durable for the mains , and give him his poly crosses.

kenyee
05-09-2010, 06:56 AM
Did you ream the holes? Sometimes they have a sharp edge that will break the string. This happened to me w/ a racquet I bought from TW. Strung it w/ Babolat VS gut...used it once. Put it in the bag and the string was still ok. Pulled it out next week and the string had popped at the grommet. TW didn't restring it for free but I did have it restrung at a local stringer and he thought the grommet it popped at wasn't reamed properly...

dgdawg
05-09-2010, 08:12 PM
I string a lot of SPPP. This scenario happens to my customers from time to time.
My policy is to restring labor fee, you (the customer) pay for the string.
On a "rim shot", a large portion of the energy is not dispersed throughout the SB and could cause a stiff string to break.
I explain this and have never had a disappointed customer.
I think the customer paying for the string is a reasonable compromise.

TearSNFX
05-09-2010, 10:19 PM
Polylon Ice is like $1.50 in material, it's good business practice to make the customer happy and set ground rules. I would switch out the string this time free but let the person know this was due to his own mistake not your stringing.

This tiny gesture of not penny pinching $1.50 and putting aside 20 minutes of your time can mean the difference of him coming back to you or not. Do the math what's more profitable for you in the long run?

Steezmuffin
05-09-2010, 11:36 PM
I hear this so often. Maybe put a disclaimer that string (poly) breakage near the frame is likely from a shank and not covered?

Never heard of a non-poly breaking from a shank though.

VS 17 jobs pop in the corners all day long!

Irvin
05-10-2010, 02:59 AM
VS 17 jobs pop in the corners all day long!

That problem in the corner would not be at a knot would it?

Irvin

Valjean
05-10-2010, 03:08 AM
People too often do overtighten knots with natural gut, not realizing how it can lead to it.

Irvin
05-10-2010, 04:18 AM
People too often do overtighten knots with natural gut, not realizing how it can lead to it.

I would venture to say for people more often than not will overtighten knots in general. When you do that with gut you run into a lot more breakage.

Irvin

mauricem
05-10-2010, 04:35 AM
Thanks for the feedback guys, pretty well confirmed what I thought to be the case.

I will restring it for goodwill although this is very much a hobby and the good will I'm referring to is social not fiscal. I really only string to justify the machine purchase and to help out team mates and the like.

If I only could restring it in 20 minutes! Unfortunately on a Gamma X-2 a full poly job takes me close to an hour and the last half of the crosses I particularly dont enjoy:(

Never cared much for polylon myself but given its reputation as "suited to frequent string breakers" I would have expected something more durable but as I understand it thats just the nature of the material

retlod
05-10-2010, 05:21 AM
Thanks for the feedback guys, pretty well confirmed what I thought to be the case.

I will restring it for goodwill although this is very much a hobby and the good will I'm referring to is social not fiscal. I really only string to justify the machine purchase and to help out team mates and the like.

If I only could restring it in 20 minutes! Unfortunately on a Gamma X-2 a full poly job takes me close to an hour and the last half of the crosses I particularly dont enjoy:(

Never cared much for polylon myself but given its reputation as "suited to frequent string breakers" I would have expected something more durable but as I understand it thats just the nature of the material

Polylon *IS* durable, but no poly can withstand a whole bunch of mishits, especially those close to the frame. I, for one, hate stringing Polylon Ice. It's pretty stiff and its coil memory is intense. Can't beat it for the price, though.

Also, I would not restring this guy's racquet for free. What's to stop him from coming back time after time and saying, "The string broke. It wasn't ever supposed to break. Will you fix it for free?" What's a reasonable amount of time to get out of a poly job? A year? A month? A week? 3 hours? Yeah, they're durable, but just like any string, they *will* break. What if he had come back after three months of hitting and wanted the strings replaced? Would you do it? Where do you draw the line? IMO his request for free restringing is not worth your "social good will." Don't be a pushover. Like you said, it's a hobby--not your primary income source. You're not going to lose much business anyway even if this guy does badmouth you. After all, would you stop going to a stringer if you heard that he/she "wouldn't even replace a stringjob that I had hit with for *only* three weeks?" :)

Steezmuffin
05-10-2010, 07:27 AM
That problem in the corner would not be at a knot would it?

Irvin

In the corner that doesn't have a knot!

Valjean
05-10-2010, 09:42 AM
I would venture to say for people more often than not will overtighten knots in general. When you do that with gut you run into a lot more breakage.

Irvin
When you say so, aren't you suggesting they are relying on the machine's tensioner rather than tugging gently on the knot's tail with a stringing pliers, like we're all supposed to?

Irvin
05-10-2010, 12:19 PM
When you say so, aren't you suggesting they are relying on the machine's tensioner rather than tugging gently on the knot's tail with a stringing pliers, like we're all supposed to?

Yikes! Using the tensioner? You can pull too hard with anything. Take a look at the guy who has a video on youtube right now on the first page. He pulls pretty hard over and over again. Too much of a good thing is not good and you can break the string pulling with your bare hand. I suggest YULitle's method of tightening strings except I would only pull one time. I do not use a Parnell knot either, but I do use a very similar knot. The Parnell knot goes under the string the knot is tied off on mine does not otherwise my knot if just like the parnell.

Irvin