PDA

View Full Version : Tell me about progressive lenses


sureshs
06-03-2010, 09:13 AM
Finally, I have to submit to age and get progressive lenses (multifocals) for my glasses.

Haven't got them yet, but the optometrist cautioned me that it will take a while to adjust.

She also said I should probably use my existing glasses for tennis otherwise the distant to near ball transitions could cause a problem.

Tell me how long it takes to get used to progressives. Should you drive imediately after you get them or use the old ones for a while? What are the issues? What did you do for tennis?

North
06-03-2010, 09:45 AM
Well, I almost fell over getting up from my chair the first time I put the progressive lenses on. Could not have driven with them the first few hours. It took 2-3 days to totally get used to them and I have not had a problem since.

Once you get used to progressive lenses themselves, there is no problem with new prescriptions on the lenses as the years go by. I play tennis with the progressive bifocals also with no problems.

sureshs
06-03-2010, 09:53 AM
Thanks. I was warned that the floor will appear raised.

I will avoid them initially for driving.

I heard stories about 2 to 3 months of adjustment. A few days sounds much better.

Tina
06-03-2010, 01:07 PM
Hero Sureshs, I hope you don't read a lot like I do for work. All the best.

sureshs
06-03-2010, 01:17 PM
Hero Sureshs, I hope you don't read a lot like I do for work. All the best.

I read a lot. Why, is it more difficult with progressives?

Tina
06-03-2010, 01:32 PM
a lot of headaches though (I heard).

Jim Hendricks
06-03-2010, 02:28 PM
I didn't have a big adjustment period. Just have to figure out where to look for the distance you're looking at.

jswinf
06-03-2010, 03:56 PM
This is an individual thing, like "what's the best tennis racket?"

Some people put on progressives and have no problems at all and wear them for everything they do. Some people can't adapt to them at all and have to use separate glasses for distance and near. Most do fine with them, but may be bothered by "active" stuff.

If you find you can wear them for tennis and do fine, great. One thing's pretty certain, though, progressives won't help you for tennis, you don't need that power change in the bottom of the lenses to see the ball as it gets close. If your existing glasses are good for distance, there's no reason not to continue using them for tennis, and then you won't get your new ones all sweaty.

ethebull
06-03-2010, 04:14 PM
I turned 50 last year and this spring I went to progressive lenses for my corection. I play at three sports regularly. Tennis, golf, and cycling. My standard correction is for myopia - near sightedness. I would never wear progressives or bifocals for sports. In fact I hate them for most everyday wear and will try reading glasses the next time I fill a new prescription.

sureshs
06-03-2010, 04:39 PM
Yeah my father also warned me because many people he knows were sold the progressives (nice money to be made there) and they had trouble adjusting. Wondering if plain old bifocals or separate reading glasses would have been better for me.

Need to wait and see.

sureshs
06-03-2010, 04:39 PM
I turned 50 last year and this spring I went to progressive lenses for my corection. I play at three sports regularly. Tennis, golf, and cycling. My standard correction is for myopia - near sightedness. I would never wear progressives or bifocals for sports. In fact I hate them for most everyday wear and will try reading glasses the next time I fill a new prescription.

The optometrist was saying I might have to use my current glasses for tennis.

North
06-03-2010, 05:39 PM
I guess I had a better experience than many people have. The first 2-3 days I had a mild nagging headache and had trouble the first few times I played tennis, getting used to switching my eyes for near/far. But, really, it was not much of an adjustment after the first few days.

jmjmkim
06-03-2010, 05:48 PM
I got my first progressive glasses about 8 mos ago. It took a few days to adjust, but the process happens naturally. You don't really intentionally try to look through the center of the lens, etc. The trick is to move the whole head and not just the eye balls. If you scan with the eyes and you track through the different parts of the lens, then you get dizzy.

If you read a lot, (like novels and Bible etc) then it might be worthwhile to get a dedicated reading lens. It you do a lot of stop and go, or just want the convenience of having one glasses, then progressive is pretty good. The lens cost a lot more though.

For playing tennis, it would not be a good idea to play in progressive lens. It is worth it to have a dedicated glasses just for your sports activities.

jmjmkim
06-03-2010, 05:51 PM
For some reason though, my eyes felt better and I have not worn my glasses for the last 4 months or so.

Also, when I play tennis, I don't wear glasses. The ball looks a little fuzzy but that's the trade-off. I feel uncomfortable with glasses on.

jswinf
06-03-2010, 08:54 PM
^^^^The ball's supposed to look fuzzy.

SoCal10s
06-04-2010, 12:02 AM
just get reading glasses ... no need to spend tons of money for fashion

Ken Honecker
06-04-2010, 05:02 AM
I use them for everything and needed no break in for softball, tennis, etc. For the first few days going down stairs seems pretty odd as the steps are out of focus but after a week or so you hardly notice. I have a buddy that uses regular bifocals for softball and has used them as an excuse for years as to why he misses grounders. I have a much better excuse, I'm simply not a good infielder I belong in the tall grass rather than the dirt.

ethebull
06-04-2010, 05:07 AM
BTW, you don't have to pay a gazzillion dollars for eyewear. If you have your scrip - Zenni optical will save you bigtime.

sureshs
06-04-2010, 08:50 AM
The lens cost a lot more though.


Tell me about it. My employer cut my vision benefits substantially last year and I am paying a large amount from my pocket.

sureshs
06-04-2010, 08:52 AM
I use them for everything and needed no break in for softball, tennis, etc. For the first few days going down stairs seems pretty odd as the steps are out of focus but after a week or so you hardly notice. I have a buddy that uses regular bifocals for softball and has used them as an excuse for years as to why he misses grounders. I have a much better excuse, I'm simply not a good infielder I belong in the tall grass rather than the dirt.

I will adapt his excuse to tennis. From what I am hearing, I can easily go the next couple of years playing crappy tennis and using the progressives as an excuse.

North
06-05-2010, 05:28 AM
I will adapt his excuse to tennis. From what I am hearing, I can easily go the next couple of years playing crappy tennis and using the progressives as an excuse.

Good for you - lol! The excuse will work the rest of your life. Whenever I shank an easy ball I just shake my head and mutter something about my glasses and "overdue for a new prescription" ;D

jswinf
06-05-2010, 09:43 AM
^^^Be careful with this, you might find out you're playing with an optometrist who'll say "How about next Tuesday?" And your line calls might be scrutinized more closely...:razz:

North
06-05-2010, 03:36 PM
^^^Be careful with this, you might find out you're playing with an optometrist who'll say "How about next Tuesday?" And your line calls might be scrutinized more closely...:razz:

Good points. I actually do play my ophtholmologist once in a while, so I guess I better be careful. I call lines so liberally, the only questions I've ever had about my line calls is that I am probably calling out balls as good - lol.

sureshs
06-06-2010, 10:21 AM
Good points. I actually do play my ophtholmologist once in a while, so I guess I better be careful. I call lines so liberally, the only questions I've ever had about my line calls is that I am probably calling out balls as good - lol.

It is tough for him. If he questions your calls, it reflects badly on his skill!

Geezer Guy
06-06-2010, 06:23 PM
Finally, I have to submit to age and get progressive lenses (multifocals) for my glasses.

Haven't got them yet, but the optometrist cautioned me that it will take a while to adjust.

She also said I should probably use my existing glasses for tennis otherwise the distant to near ball transitions could cause a problem.

Tell me how long it takes to get used to progressives. Should you drive imediately after you get them or use the old ones for a while? What are the issues? What did you do for tennis?

I started wearing progressive lenses several years ago. It DOES take a little while to adjust, but not too long. For me it was just a couple of days.

However, when I went to play tennis with them I had a lot of problems. The lenses seem to distort where the ball appears to be from where it actually is. It was so bad that I couldn't even get through the warm-up phase. I took my glasses off and played fine, so that's what I've been doing ever since. I wear my glasses from the time I wake up to the time I go to bed - EXCEPT when I'm playing tennis or some other sport. Anything hand-eye related I play without glasses.

jswinf
06-06-2010, 07:22 PM
^^^^That's a fine way to do it IF your basic need for distance correction isn't that much. Lots of glasses wearers would be swinging at shadows of birds and smacking drink cups off of benches without their glasses.

Tina
06-06-2010, 07:23 PM
^^^^That's a fine way to do it IF your basic need for distance correction isn't that much. Lots of glasses wearers would be swinging at shadows of birds and smacking drink cups off of benches without their glasses.

Agreed! :)

Geezer Guy
06-06-2010, 10:00 PM
Yeah. My distance vision is fine. I just need help with the "up close" work. Occasionally I'll forget to put my glasses back on after a match and not even notice until I get home and try to enter the scores online - and wonder why the screen is so fuzzy.

slewisoh
06-06-2010, 10:08 PM
I am a Progressive Lens Hater! Purchased a pair last year because I do a lot of accounting work where I need to look down at pages in front of me and then look up at a computer screen that is a few feet away. I end up with massive headaches.

Certainly can't use them for tennis or driving - constantly trying to find the correct area of lens to peer through. I've taken to keeping a pair of distance glasses in my tennis bag, and in the car, and leaving my Progressive Lenses sitting in the case.

sureshs
06-07-2010, 05:19 AM
I am scared of the progressives now.

slewisoh
06-07-2010, 05:27 AM
I'm going back to my old method of perching my distance glasses on my nose in such a way so as to see the game on TV across the room while simultaneously "looking under" the glasses to see the crossword puzzle in front of me.

Very attractive, I'm sure! :shock:

sureshs
07-31-2010, 10:23 AM
3 weeks on progressives now. Used a vacation to get used to it. Played tennis with them and everything is fine. Have started driving again recently. No problems.

Took me about 3 days to adjust.

Only thing still bothering me is occasional blurred view which requires a very small time to adjust and go away.

North
07-31-2010, 10:34 AM
There, you see (no pun intended) - the progressive lenses really aren't a problem. Sounds like your experience was similar to mine.

Glad you are doing well with them. You may notice in a couple of years when you need a new prescription - I find the progressive lenses have made me very attuned to when it is time to get new glasses.

sureshs
07-31-2010, 11:26 AM
There, you see (no pun intended) - the progressive lenses really aren't a problem. Sounds like your experience was similar to mine.

Glad you are doing well with them. You may notice in a couple of years when you need a new prescription - I find the progressive lenses have made me very attuned to when it is time to get new glasses.

I notice that, in general, everything is blurred ever so slightly and for an ever-so-small adjustment time. I am still waiting for my brain to compensate, but I think the slight blurriness is an inevitable result of the constantly changing focal length of the lens across its extent. Without the optimal head and eye angle, nothing can be viewed optimally with this system, or so it seems to me.

Tina
07-31-2010, 09:47 PM
I notice that, in general, everything is blurred ever so slightly and for an ever-so-small adjustment time. I am still waiting for my brain to compensate, but I think the slight blurriness is an inevitable result of the constantly changing focal length of the lens across its extent. Without the optimal head and eye angle, nothing can be viewed optimally with this system, or so it seems to me.

Welcome back, Hero Sureshs. I haven't seen you for a while at TTW. How are you doing? -Tina

North
08-01-2010, 07:09 AM
I notice that, in general, everything is blurred ever so slightly and for an ever-so-small adjustment time. I am still waiting for my brain to compensate, but I think the slight blurriness is an inevitable result of the constantly changing focal length of the lens across its extent. Without the optimal head and eye angle, nothing can be viewed optimally with this system, or so it seems to me.

That's interesting. I never noticed that, though it may simply have been that I ignored it. Don't know how old you are but I do know it takes the brain longer to make neural connectons as we get older (like if you are in your 40s or more). You may adjust, though.

sureshs
08-01-2010, 08:47 AM
Welcome back, Hero Sureshs. I haven't seen you for a while at TTW. How are you doing? -Tina

If you see my earlier post, I was on vacation.

What is going on here that I should know of?

sureshs
08-01-2010, 08:48 AM
Don't know how old you are

46...........

Cindysphinx
08-01-2010, 11:35 AM
I'm glad you found a solution. Me, I'm not doing well.

I have worn contact lenses since I was 16. I don't wear glasses often, and never for sports. I now use soft Touric contacts (for astigmatism).

Now that I need reading glasses, I seem to spend all of my time thinking about reading glasses. Where are they? Which strength should I use for what task? I have five pairs -- one pair on each level of the house, one pair in the car and one pair in my purse. I feel like I'm constantly searching for the things.

Simple things -- shopping for groceries -- are a massive pain in the butt because I can't read any packaging labels and prices. So I walk around with a pair of reading glasses perched up on my head -- when they aren't falling off and skittering halfway down the aisle.

Then when I don't have my contacts in (say, reading a book in bed at night), reading glasses don't work. I guess I need different readers for that. :sigh:

I could get a pair of progressives or bifocals, but I fear that introducing yet another variable will make life even more difficult. I can imagine forgetting to bring contacts to a match and having to retire because I would never be able to play in bifocals.

Has anyone tried bifocal contacts?

sureshs
08-01-2010, 02:08 PM
There are even progressive (multifocal) contacts available.

Heck, they even have progressive lenses for cataract surgeries where they replace your natural lens with the artificial one.

Tina
08-01-2010, 07:53 PM
If you see my earlier post, I was on vacation.

What is going on here that I should know of?

There is a thread about you. Check it out!!:) -Tina

sureshs
08-02-2010, 08:00 AM
There is a thread about you. Check it out!!:) -Tina

Please post the link

Tina
08-02-2010, 06:30 PM
Please post the link

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=338739