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aimr75
06-13-2010, 05:05 AM
I'm heading to New York in a few days and was wondering how much people usually tip in the US?

10s talk
06-13-2010, 05:19 AM
10-20%..... depending on service

Fedace
06-13-2010, 05:42 AM
I tip 100 % for the haircut...

jimbo333
06-13-2010, 05:58 AM
10-20%..... depending on service

Or slightly less, if you are Pete Sampras (apparently:))

Geezer Guy
06-13-2010, 06:26 AM
Normally I tip a buck per bag for people that help with luggage. (or more, depending)
10% is normal for taxi drivers, I hear.
15% - 20% for food service, depending on quality of service.
Bartenders I tip heavily at the start of the evening so I'll get good service. As the evening goes on I tip less and less so they'll slow down. (I always pay by the drink - I don't like running a tab.)

I tip my barber $5, but he's just a regular barber - it's not a fancy hair salon like women go too.

ProgressoR
06-13-2010, 08:33 AM
i tell them i am british and not to expect a tip.
In a truly multicultural city they should understand that, and I would expect a genuine "thank you" from me would be enough compensation for them to do the job they are paid to do.

Josephj1100
06-13-2010, 09:11 AM
i tell them i am british and not to expect a tip.
In a truly multicultural city they should understand that, and I would expect a genuine "thank you" from me would be enough compensation for them to do the job they are paid to do.

I'm hoping this is a troll attempt but in the small chance that it's not I'm going to tell you that servers do not recieve a normal wage and in fact rely on tips to make up the bulk of their salary. A simple thank you will not compensate them enough to improve the 1.65 base hourly wage they get and in fact will probably lead to you not having good service anywhere in america.

Claudius
06-13-2010, 09:26 AM
i tell them i am british and not to expect a tip.
In a truly multicultural city they should understand that, and I would expect a genuine "thank you" from me would be enough compensation for them to do the job they are paid to do.

I hope you're not being serious. Being British doesn't excuse you from tipping.:?

BobFL
06-13-2010, 10:08 AM
I'm heading to New York in a few days and was wondering how much people usually tip in the US?

15% non negotiable and 20% if you are really happy with the service. I always tip 15% regardless of anything and up to 30%...

Tina
06-13-2010, 10:12 AM
10-15% mostly.

I also put one dollar on my bed in the hotel.

aimr75
06-13-2010, 03:41 PM
thanks for the replies..

ninman
06-13-2010, 03:49 PM
Tip nothing, don't succumb to social pressure.

jmverdugo
06-13-2010, 03:56 PM
What about when the service or the tip is "included" on the bill?

ninman
06-13-2010, 03:57 PM
What about when the service or the tip is "included" on the bill?

Tell them to remove it, and that you're not paying it.

Geezer Guy
06-13-2010, 04:18 PM
I also put one dollar on my bed in the hotel.

For $1 the staff just swaps your sheets with someone else's that just left $1.

If you want clean sheets you need to leave at least $5.

ninman
06-13-2010, 04:24 PM
For $1 the staff just swaps your sheets with someone else's that just left $1.

If you want clean sheets you need to leave at least $5.

remind me never to stay in an American hotel. I would tip zero and demand clean sheets. If no clean sheets are coming then I'm going to complain to the manager.

kevsaenz
06-13-2010, 04:33 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-qV9wVGb38

(Blank)
06-13-2010, 05:21 PM
What about when the service or the tip is "included" on the bill?

If a service/gratuity charge is already added onto the bill then you're not expected to add more. The amount of grat varies between places but it ranges from 15-20%. However, if you feel like your server deserves more than the grat listed, feel free to add more. A few extra dollars can make a huge difference in a server's night.

The gratuity is there for big parties to protect the server from getting stiffed on large parties and actually lose money. Where I work, we have to pay out 3% of the total bill to the hostesses/bartenders/bussers so getting $2 on a $100 tab means we actually lose money. If the service is horrible, you can talk to a manager and get it removed and leave what you feel was deserved.

So tip well and just because you're foreign isn't an excuse! When in Rome, do as Romans. And don't tip in Japan.

SuperFly
06-13-2010, 06:23 PM
10-15%, but most of the guys who get tips are living really skimpy lives. Make their day and tip them a bit extra. :)

Steady Eddy
06-13-2010, 07:54 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-qV9wVGb38That's a great movie. I could watch clips from it all day, except for the ear scene. Once is enough for that.

CanadianChic
06-13-2010, 08:36 PM
I'm heading to New York in a few days and was wondering how much people usually tip in the US?

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=286912&highlight=tip

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=226494&highlight=tip

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=108900&highlight=tip

The search function is your friend. Your welcome.

ProgressoR
06-13-2010, 10:14 PM
well, I was only trolling a bit earlier, I actually dont live in the UK right now, and I get good service from people on very low wages here, so i DO TIP. In the UK generally no, perhaps a couple of quid in a food place if service was good, but generally it isnt that good in the UK, to be honest.

I would hate to feel pressured to tip because its the done thing, but if a waiter is on a very low salary, and makes effort to ensure i have a decent experience, then sure I would tip, anywhere between 10-20%.

But if i get Americans telling me no no no you have to tip because its the custom and because the employers are stiffing their employees and when in rome etc, then I would resist it.

however, as I said above, if service was GOOD, then I would tip and perhaps tip a bit more if i knew the waiters were getting paid peanuts.

dParis
06-14-2010, 05:06 AM
well, I was only trolling a bit earlier, I actually dont live in the UK right now, and I get good service from people on very low wages here, so i DO TIP. In the UK generally no, perhaps a couple of quid in a food place if service was good, but generally it isnt that good in the UK, to be honest.

I would hate to feel pressured to tip because its the done thing, but if a waiter is on a very low salary, and makes effort to ensure i have a decent experience, then sure I would tip, anywhere between 10-20%.

But if i get Americans telling me no no no you have to tip because its the custom and because the employers are stiffing their employees and when in rome etc, then I would resist it.

however, as I said above, if service was GOOD, then I would tip and perhaps tip a bit more if i knew the waiters were getting paid peanuts.
In other words, you're a lousy tipper.

jmverdugo
06-14-2010, 05:38 AM
Tell them to remove it, and that you're not paying it.

Actually I am just asking to see if it required to add more on top of that. I used to work as a waiter at the beggining of College I know that the tip is important for the waiter income, laws and customs are different in every country and every place, for instance here, you will always get a 10% service included on your bill, that is the payment of the waiters, and like 99% of the time people will leave a tip on top of that, so you usually end up paying between 15 and 20% of tip. In other countries you do not even have to leave a tip but that is because the waiters have a normal monthly salary, so the tip or service fee is not required, so it is always good to ask how the tip thing works in every place.

If a service/gratuity charge is already added onto the bill then you're not expected to add more. The amount of grat varies between places but it ranges from 15-20%. However, if you feel like your server deserves more than the grat listed, feel free to add more. A few extra dollars can make a huge difference in a server's night.

The gratuity is there for big parties to protect the server from getting stiffed on large parties and actually lose money. Where I work, we have to pay out 3% of the total bill to the hostesses/bartenders/bussers so getting $2 on a $100 tab means we actually lose money. If the service is horrible, you can talk to a manager and get it removed and leave what you feel was deserved.

So tip well and just because you're foreign isn't an excuse! When in Rome, do as Romans. And don't tip in Japan.

Ok, thanks for the information, I totally agree with you about tip according the local customs.

sureshs
06-14-2010, 07:41 AM
15% all the time. Just easier to be consistent and the math is also easier (involves shifting a decimal point, dividing by 2, and adding). 10% is considered too little and I think 20% is way too much. 15% keeps everyone happy, specially if you also look poor and wearing old mismatched clothing, like I do.

Rockitdog
06-14-2010, 07:58 AM
Tip nothing, don't succumb to social pressure.

Tell them to remove it, and that you're not paying it.

Says the guy dealing with the crazy Chinese women...

Rockitdog
06-14-2010, 07:59 AM
If I was a cab drive who had an British person who was actualy arrogant enough to tell me they weren't going to tip I'd drive their ***** all over town and make a 15-20 ride 2 hours!

raiden031
06-14-2010, 08:01 AM
Only do less than 15% if waitor is very rude or neglects you. If the level of service is reasonable, then you should be tipping closer to 20%.

sureshs
06-14-2010, 08:07 AM
A good strategy is to pretend you just arrived in the US and speak very little English and don't understand the currency. Some guys will actually demand tips, like the curbside checkin guys at the airport. Just pretend you don't understand what they say.

raiden031
06-14-2010, 08:11 AM
15% keeps everyone happy, specially if you also look poor and wearing old mismatched clothing, like I do.

I'd beg to differ on this one. If you are too poor to tip adequately, then you should really eat at a place where you purchase your food order over the counter? No?

Cindysphinx
06-14-2010, 08:12 AM
Just tip 20% and have done with it. It is the rare server who is deliberately rude and surly.

Do unto others, golden rule, karma, old-fashioned human kindness . . . all good reasons not to walk the earth stiffing people on tips.

Jennifer
06-14-2010, 10:08 AM
As a former waitress, please tip closer to 20%. Most of us depend on your tips to balance out the minumum wage we receive. Thank you.

-Jennifer

mucat
06-14-2010, 02:39 PM
Sampras is my idol. If $1 is enough for him... :twisted:

ProgressoR
06-14-2010, 11:56 PM
I'd beg to differ on this one. If you are too poor to tip adequately, then you should really eat at a place where you purchase your food order over the counter? No?

sureshs is not poor (i presume) but he might dress as he claims, thereby reducing tip expectations.

Bartelby
06-15-2010, 12:03 AM
A tip should be for service beyond normal expectation. It shouldn't be to recompense staff for normal service because wages are miserly. If it is a compulsory payment that goes directly to staff, then that's a different matter.

ninman
06-15-2010, 05:51 AM
As a former waitress, please tip closer to 20%. Most of us depend on your tips to balance out the minumum wage we receive. Thank you.

-Jennifer

As a customer I'd like to explain that tips are not obligatory and that restaurants are not charities, and even if they were they should not be demanding donations. It's not up to us to pay your salary, it's up to your boss.

vortex1
06-15-2010, 05:54 AM
As a former waitress, please tip closer to 20%. Most of us depend on your tips to balance out the minumum wage we receive. Thank you.

-Jennifer

Who's fault is it that you chose a profession that pays "minumum wage"?

raiden031
06-15-2010, 06:55 AM
Who's fault is it that you chose a profession that pays "minumum wage"?

Is it morally right that someone wait on you (and other tables simultaneously) for 45-60 minutes, both knowing that the value of their work is worth more than minimum wage, yet choose to make them work for minimum wage? Seems wrong to me. Seems like taking advantage of someone for their own personal gain. That is why I'm disgusted with people who don't have enough decency to tip.

Don't like tipping, Don't eat out!

jmverdugo
06-15-2010, 06:58 AM
There is a reason why in some places the owner doesn't pay the waiters salary, if you have to add the cost to the plates then the price of the food would be too high! so they only pay part of the waiter salary and the rest is earned by tips. In some places you can actually go and ask the food at the counter and do not pay for the service. I wonder if any of this cheapos are willing to do that. In some places the waiters actually preffers the tip way and it is on the law and on the contract in the case there is an union involved.

vortex1
06-15-2010, 07:09 AM
Is it morally right that someone wait on you (and other tables simultaneously) for 45-60 minutes, both knowing that the value of their work is worth more than minimum wage, yet choose to make them work for minimum wage? Seems wrong to me. Seems like taking advantage of someone for their own personal gain. That is why I'm disgusted with people who don't have enough decency to tip.

Don't like tipping, Don't eat out!

Perhaps you should look the meaning of the word "tip" in the dictionary. Tips are non compulsory payments awarded for exceptional service. Morals and ethics have absolutely no meaning here. If the service is poor, they don't deserve anything. I couldn't care less what their situation is. Being a waiter is a low skill job, which only requires having a pulse to do. They don't deserve anything.

raiden031
06-15-2010, 07:17 AM
Perhaps you should look the meaning of the word "tip" in the dictionary. Tips are non compulsory payments awarded for exceptional service. Morals and ethics have absolutely no meaning here. If the service is poor, they don't deserve anything. I couldn't care less what their situation is. Being a waiter is a low skill job, which only requires having a pulse to do. They don't deserve anything.

The dictionary definition is irrelevant. And morals and ethics have EVERYTHING to do with it. Why would a decent human being make someone work for almost nothing? Only a jerk would do that!

raiden031
06-15-2010, 07:18 AM
In some places you can actually go and ask the food at the counter and do not pay for the service. I wonder if any of this cheapos are willing to do that.

Of course not! These jerks want to get something for nothing.

inthemisosoup
06-15-2010, 07:31 AM
generally, 15-20% in restaurants and hair salons and the like but i usually leave about 18%. just easier to figure out that way, in my state the tax is 6% so i just triple it to figure out tip. ;)

if i am at a bar generally $1 per round (for me, it's usually just 1 or 2 drinks a round so it's not like i'm ordering 5 things and tipping $1), unless it's a very large order, then you give accordingly. some people like to give more to ensure better service, maybe tip $5-$7 to start off the night and you're on the right track. you can open a tab at many bars at the start of the night and at the end, again tip maybe 10-15%.

at hotels usually give the bell man $1 per bag of luggage. every day the maids come and tidy your room and i usually leave $3-$5. but $3 really is fine.

i don't really take taxis but i'd guess it to be around 10-15% again. usually this is a safe guess if you're not sure.

just a note. there are a lot of subtleties to tipping culture here that i know is hard to catch on. for example, if you are at a restaurant where you go up and order your food at the counter and clean up after yourself, usually no tip is necessary. if you want to leave $1-$3 or whatever that's up to you. but if you are waited on and have to pay at the counter at the end of the meal, a tip is still necessary. there are also lots of other services where a varying tip is often expected, but is not quite as necessary or large. often at coffee shops there are cups/bowls on the counter for tip. usually i just throw my spare change in there, or one dollar if i am also getting food. but don't feel like you have to tip 15% there!! or really anything, i feel that is quite optional.

a lot of people here seem to think tipping is really optional. while it technically is optional, the unspoken rule is that you'll tip. a lot of these people are getting paid LESS than minimum wage because of the fact that they are getting tipped. generally, the tips are most of their income so keep that in mind. if you feel like your service was really poor, i'd still give no less than 10% but at the end of the day it's up to you. you could always talk to the manager or owner and explain why beforehand, so the waiter/waitress can keep these things in mind for the next group s/he serves.

and, like others said already if gratuity is added already to your bill, there is no need to add a tip!! unless you really want to.

hope that helps! if you aren't sure you could always ask someone around you for help. americans in general are very friendly.

mucat
06-15-2010, 07:43 AM
The dictionary definition is irrelevant. And morals and ethics have EVERYTHING to do with it. Why would a decent human being make someone work for almost nothing? Only a jerk would do that!

So they are being forced to work in a restaurant? I did not know that.

Legend of Borg
06-15-2010, 07:51 AM
The dictionary definition is irrelevant. And morals and ethics have EVERYTHING to do with it. Why would a decent human being make someone work for almost nothing? Only a jerk would do that!

Who is MAKING them work? Maybe you should take your argument against the managers who employed those poor souls. If they are being underpaid, you should blame the manager, rather than calling the customers cheapos.

Bartelby
06-15-2010, 07:59 AM
The client is not the employer and the client has not set the minimum wage.

The client is not responsible for what the employee is paid nor for the system of industrial relations.

Tips should not be in lieu of decent wages.



Is it morally right that someone wait on you (and other tables simultaneously) for 45-60 minutes, both knowing that the value of their work is worth more than minimum wage, yet choose to make them work for minimum wage? Seems wrong to me. Seems like taking advantage of someone for their own personal gain. That is why I'm disgusted with people who don't have enough decency to tip.

Don't like tipping, Don't eat out!

jmverdugo
06-15-2010, 08:12 AM
Tipping is the best way to handle the salary of the waiters, it rewards the better worker and it almost a guarantee that you will get a good service, for both the owner and the customer.

The better the waiter the more money he gets and everybody is happy, the client, the restaurant and the waiter.

I am pretty sure that the whole tipping thing started because waiters were and optional service, if you wanted to be served then you had to pay directly to the waiter, nowdays everybody take it for granted and think they HAVE to be served.

Juges8932
06-15-2010, 08:16 AM
Typically, 15-20% is the amount that is respected.

Me, personally, I always tip generously (25% or more) unless:

-They give crappy service (Not attentive, horrible attitude, etc)
-They grat me. I will not give them a penny more.

Also, I notice those who are outside of the US are critical towards tipping/don't understand why it is there. Personally, I agree, I think the corporations should simply pay their employees better, so the clients don't have to tip, or at least not as much. However, given the circumstances, waiters should get tips. They get paid ~2.15-3.15/hr, which is not minimum wage and obviously, they can't make a living off of that and depend on the tips. However, the more they work, the more tables they have, the more people, thus more bills and more tips. So, in theory, they make an amount proportional (directly) to how much they work, which isn't that bad.

Gorecki
06-15-2010, 08:21 AM
whatever you do, remember... HE IS WATCHING YOU!

http://www.sportsillustrated.co.za/files/2009/11/Agassi.jpg

Gorecki
06-15-2010, 08:27 AM
Is it morally right that someone wait on you (and other tables simultaneously) for 45-60 minutes, both knowing that the value of their work is worth more than minimum wage, yet choose to make them work for minimum wage? Seems wrong to me. Seems like taking advantage of someone for their own personal gain. That is why I'm disgusted with people who don't have enough decency to tip.

Don't like tipping, Don't eat out!

So, you tipp the guy charging your bill at the supermarket line??

Juges8932
06-15-2010, 08:34 AM
So, you tipp the guy charging your bill at the supermarket line??


The cashier at the supermarket is getting paid at least minimum wage. However, in some supermarkets, you have people who help you carry your stuff out to your car and help you put the bags in your car and it is expected that you tip them (Small amount, 1-3$).

Gorecki
06-15-2010, 08:43 AM
The cashier at the supermarket is getting paid at least minimum wage. However, in some supermarkets, you have people who help you carry your stuff out to your car and help you put the bags in your car and it is expected that you tip them (Small amount, 1-3$).

well. in that case it's a matter of different perception and culture.

Juges8932
06-15-2010, 08:48 AM
well. in that case it's a matter of different perception and culture.

Which is what I said in my first post ^^.

Gorecki
06-15-2010, 08:52 AM
Which is what I said in my first post ^^.

oh... i see it now... :-?

i was actually adressing the other poster! so i skipped yours!

sureshs
06-15-2010, 09:01 AM
I'd beg to differ on this one. If you are too poor to tip adequately, then you should really eat at a place where you purchase your food order over the counter? No?

Why? A poor guy can also splurge from time to time.

sureshs
06-15-2010, 09:03 AM
Why not make robots that will wait on people?

mucat
06-15-2010, 09:52 AM
Why not make robots that will wait on people?

But the robots will be made in some 3rd world countries by minimum wage workers, child workers, political prisoners, etc...

sureshs
06-15-2010, 10:17 AM
But the robots will be made in some 3rd world countries by minimum wage workers, child workers, political prisoners, etc...

Usually robot manufacturing is still high-end and closely guarded.

And eventually, robots will build other robots.

mucat
06-15-2010, 10:29 AM
And eventually, robots will build other robots.

Oh my goodness. Shut me down! Machines making machines. Hmm. How perverse.

ProgressoR
06-15-2010, 11:42 AM
I like to know how much i am being charged for a service and i decide to take it or leave it. I wouldnt hire lawyers and then expect to tip them for a job well done. The minimum wage thing looks like employers ripping off their employees. If I go to a restaurant, I expect decent service and food for the price offered to me on the menu. If service is then included in the bill I have never asked for it to be removed, and it normally is inluded in the bill. If someone in the supermarket takes my shopping to my car i will tip them, if i dont need that help i will inform them in the market not to bother.

Its not so much the tipping or paying a bit extra if you think it is deserved, but more the fact that just by doing a basic job the inference is you should tip. And if you dont agree then you get Americans calling you cheapo and other insults and belittling.


That is hardly civilised behaviour. And this is the typical reaction of several (presumably) American posters on a few tipping threads around here.

raiden031
06-15-2010, 11:43 AM
So, you tipp the guy charging your bill at the supermarket line??

No, I only tip people whose income is dependent upon tips. If they provide adequate service, they get paid for their work. If they don't provide adequate service, they get nothing. Thats the advantage of gratuity, that you can take it away when the service is performed poorly. If you don't pay them no matter how good the service is, then you are taking advantage of them.

raiden031
06-15-2010, 11:48 AM
I like to know how much i am being charged for a service and i decide to take it or leave it. I wouldnt hire lawyers and then expect to tip them for a job well done. The minimum wage thing looks like employers ripping off their employees. If I go to a restaurant, I expect decent service and food for the price offered to me on the menu. If service is then included in the bill I have never asked for it to be removed, and it normally is inluded in the bill. If someone in the supermarket takes my shopping to my car i will tip them, if i dont need that help i will inform them in the market not to bother.

Its not so much the tipping or paying a bit extra if you think it is deserved, but more the fact that just by doing a basic job the inference is you should tip. And if you dont agree then you get Americans calling you cheapo and other insults and belittling.

That is hardly civilised behaviour. And this is the typical reaction of several (presumably) American posters on a few tipping threads around here.

The bolded statements say it all. If you don't want to pay for the service, then don't use the service! Whenever I go to a hotel with bellhops, I always decline their services because I don't want to tip them. I don't accept their services and then refuse to tip them, because thats abusing them. If I don't want to tip a waitor, then I'll eat at an establishment where I order over the counter. Its not rocket science. Its common decency.

jmverdugo
06-15-2010, 11:48 AM
I think that, specifically in the case of the waiters, the problem is the use of the word tip, it should be more like Service Fee.

Edit: Actually, down here you see on the menus that a 10% for Service Fee will be included on the bill, and anything you leave above that is called tip.

ProgressoR
06-15-2010, 11:49 AM
No, I only tip people whose income is dependent upon tips. If they provide adequate service, they get paid for their work. If they don't provide adequate service, they get nothing. Thats the advantage of gratuity, that you can take it away when the service is performed poorly. If you don't pay them no matter how good the service is, then you are taking advantage of them.

Surely this is nonsense, its the employer who is taking advantage of them and trying to pass on his responsibility (of paying a fair wage for the work done) to customers who are already paying what is advertised and asked of them.

raiden031
06-15-2010, 11:54 AM
Surely this is nonsense, its the employer who is taking advantage of them and trying to pass on his responsibility (of paying a fair wage for the work done) to customers who are already paying what is advertised and asked of them.

Every customer who spends enough time in the US knows exactly how the system works. I like the fact that I have control over the cost of the service at a restaurant. I've not tipped before, but only because the waitor didn't deserve it.

jms007
06-15-2010, 12:04 PM
I've always found the concept of tipping to be odd. A waiters job is to serve customers. It should go without saying that you should get adequate service, regardless of whether you intend to tip or not.

(Blank)
06-15-2010, 01:17 PM
If restaurants decided to pay minimum wage to all FOH (front of house) workers, which includes the hostess, bartenders, bussers, and servers, the prices of food would skyrocket.

Also, tipping gives servers a huge incentive to do give good service. Servers can make decent money off of tips as long as they don't suck. If there was tips, service would probably drop as there's no reason to pretend that every parent's kid that comes in is cute.

mucat
06-15-2010, 01:28 PM
If restaurants decided to pay minimum wage to all FOH (front of house) workers, which includes the hostess, bartenders, bussers, and servers, the prices of food would skyrocket.

I heard in some other countries, tipping is not required and might be seen as an insult. I doubt price of eating out skyrocketed in those places.

jms007
06-15-2010, 01:34 PM
If restaurants decided to pay minimum wage to all FOH (front of house) workers, which includes the hostess, bartenders, bussers, and servers, the prices of food would skyrocket.

They would go for sure. Skyrocket? I don't know about that. You know there's plenty of countries in the world that do not employ the tip system in the restaurants.

Also, tipping gives servers a huge incentive to do give good service. Servers can make decent money off of tips as long as they don't suck. If there was tips, service would probably drop as there's no reason to pretend that every parent's kid that comes in is cute.

Good, I don't need false enthusiasm. And expectations of a job well-done are implied by way of your employment at the restaurant.

sureshs
06-15-2010, 01:34 PM
If restaurants decided to pay minimum wage to all FOH (front of house) workers, which includes the hostess, bartenders, bussers, and servers, the prices of food would skyrocket.

Also, tipping gives servers a huge incentive to do give good service. Servers can make decent money off of tips as long as they don't suck. If there was tips, service would probably drop as there's no reason to pretend that every parent's kid that comes in is cute.

Isn't that true for every job including yours? If you had to ingratiate yourself to strangers to support yourself and your family, you would also provide better service. Let us try it.

Bartelby
06-15-2010, 03:40 PM
This surely the point as well. Tipping is not a cultural thing. It is a structural thing built into salary in the US. So it should be at the top of every menu that there is an obligatory payment by way of tip of x% upwards. By pretending it's some sort of cultural peculiarity, given voluntarily, the client is deliberately misinformed as to total cost. This is hardly market transparency.



Surely this is nonsense, its the employer who is taking advantage of them and trying to pass on his responsibility (of paying a fair wage for the work done) to customers who are already paying what is advertised and asked of them.

raiden031
06-15-2010, 04:57 PM
I heard in some other countries, tipping is not required and might be seen as an insult. I doubt price of eating out skyrocketed in those places.

When I visited Rome, Florence, and Venice in Italy, it was insanely expensive to eat out in a restaurant when compared to the US. Over there its customary to leave small tips, can't remember if its like 5% of 5 euros, but not only was the total cost of the meal many more Euros than Dollars in the US, but the Euro was worth 1.5 dollars at the time as well, adding insult to injury.

Tina
06-15-2010, 05:03 PM
I don't like giving tips for any taxi driver in city.

vortex1
06-15-2010, 05:10 PM
I heard in some other countries, tipping is not required and might be seen as an insult. I doubt price of eating out skyrocketed in those places.

Yep. In Japan, in some places it would be seen as an insult.

mucat
06-15-2010, 07:38 PM
When I visited Rome, Florence, and Venice in Italy, it was insanely expensive to eat out in a restaurant when compared to the US. Over there its customary to leave small tips, can't remember if its like 5% of 5 euros, but not only was the total cost of the meal many more Euros than Dollars in the US, but the Euro was worth 1.5 dollars at the time as well, adding insult to injury.

There are probably some cheap eatery where locals eat out in those cities, just like in any other cities.

vortex1 mentioned Japan, I know there are cheap places to eat out in Japan, I am sure it is the same for euro cities.