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View Full Version : leaded racket vs natural racket?


Jessica
07-10-2010, 05:38 PM
I'm growing tired of my wilson k pro tour. I think it's way too light, and I can't get enough topspin. It's already leaded at the 3' and 9.' I want to lead the 11' and 1' to make the racket more spin friendly.

Does anybody care to comment on the difference between a leaded heavier racket verses a genuinely born to be heavy racket?

Please don't suggest other strings, I got enough on my mind with all these various rackets.

Limpinhitter
07-10-2010, 05:59 PM
Does the K Pro Tour have an 18x20 string pattern like the BLX Pro Tour? If so, that might be the issue.

Jessica
07-10-2010, 06:08 PM
yes it does. Please, no discussion about strings lol.

I happen to have a 80s racket. It's much heavier than the racket I'm using. I find myself liking this racket more because of its weight. My k pro tour feels like a feather. I figure that a heavier racket would allow me to plow through and still get me more topspin - not to mention stability.

dunno
07-10-2010, 06:31 PM
Hmm, well the aero pro is not a heavy racket but it can get some nice spin. also try making the racket more headlight and see if that helps you get more spin. also stringing the racket at a lower tension can help.

Jessica
07-10-2010, 08:33 PM
Does anybody care to comment on the difference between a leaded heavier racket verses a genuinely born to be heavy racket?

ok, can we get to this question? The point is to get a more stable racket that can make it easier for me to play against heavy hitters. I just want to know if a leaded racket is at any disadvantage to unleaded rackets with an evenly distributed frame.

movdqa
07-10-2010, 08:43 PM
I prefer not to add lead. I think that dispersing more material makes for an overall stronger frame. I also don't like to deal with lead and the matching and customization of several racquets. That said, you can fine tune with lead.

NLBwell
07-10-2010, 09:39 PM
Depends on how much and where you put the lead. There is an infinite variety of ways to do it.
That said, the more lead you have to add, the more complex it is to get a distribution throughout the frame that you like. Unless you like it very polarized, with all the weight in the head and the grip (which I don't), it's hard to get a racket to feel just right if you need to add something like an ounce or more of weight.

armsty
07-10-2010, 09:47 PM
yes it does. Please, no discussion about strings lol.

I happen to have a 80s racket. It's much heavier than the racket I'm using. I find myself liking this racket more because of its weight. My k pro tour feels like a feather. I figure that a heavier racket would allow me to plow through and still get me more topspin - not to mention stability.

Are you sure you're using a KPro Tour then? They definitely have a 16x20, not 18x20...

flashfire276
07-10-2010, 09:56 PM
A leaded racquet can be customized to your favored specs. A heavy racquet has less room to do that.

marosmith
07-10-2010, 09:57 PM
Add weight, but counterbalance with weight in the handle or a leather grip.

Steve Huff
07-10-2010, 10:00 PM
Jessica, if you can handle the weight, but still want lots of topspin and stability, the first place I'd add it is to the handle. Yes, even when the wt is in the handle, stability is improved. Plus, you don't add much to the swingweight, so you can still whip the head around (low to high) faster, to get more topspin. Adding wt to the head may slow your swing down some and actually reduce topspin. When I added wt to my frame, I hit a heavier ball, bit it did have noticably less topspin. The racket I use now is 12.3 oz strung. I've tried some at 12.7 oz strung, but they were hard on my shoulder, and I also found myself a little late when returning hard serves. You may be able to benefit from more wt in the head, but I'd start in the handle. Don't worry so much about the balance. You want a swingweight you can handle well, but a wt that is stable enough against your competition.

xFullCourtTenniSx
07-11-2010, 12:26 AM
Well, the first thing that comes to mind when you ask about the difference between naturally heavy rackets and custom weighted rackets are those Pro Stock Head rackets. And the answer to that is the same reason why those Pro Stock rackets are so light without custom weight; simply put you have more control over the final result.

If you already have enough stability, you should skip the lead at 11 and 1 and take a whole strip across the top (which will probably end up being from 11 to 1). From there, counterbalance with some lead in the buttcap. I've added about 12 grams across the top of one of my light rackets and counterbalanced it, and turned it into a real spin machine. I can't do that with my [K]Six.One Tours, but they do generate plenty of spin the way I have them now.

cellofaan
07-11-2010, 01:04 AM
Like xFullCourtTenniSx said, the only difference is that you have much more control over the final specs and weight distribution than rackets that are heavy coming out of the factory.

Of course, lead won't work as structural material, where graphite will, but that is no issue for tennis rackets, as they don't need to be as strong and stiff as possible. They are built to have a certain strength and stiffness, which typically requires far less material than you'd need to get the weight and other specs to their final value. Lots of stock rackets have lead in the handle already.

OldButGame
07-11-2010, 06:47 AM
I prefer not to add lead. I think that dispersing more material makes for an overall stronger frame. I also don't like to deal with lead and the matching and customization of several racquets. That said, you can fine tune with lead.
I'm in this camp too. I prefer to play my racquets as stock. (partly why i buy so many).
That having been said,...i believe,...and i'm no expert, that weight brings stability. You will get a more stable racquet generally speaking whether You add lead or work with a heavier racquet, period.

Ooooops,..sorry!!!...You were asking about spin,.....i know even less about that.:oops:

Falloutjr
07-11-2010, 07:12 AM
Weight reduces topspin, actually. Force is mass times acceleration. While pace can be generated through a racquet with a lot of mass or through more acceleration, topspin can only be increased with acceleration. If you're looking to increase topspin, I would suggest looking at your form first, as this is what generated about 70% of your spin. Grip is a big one. Secondly, racquet is important. If you want a racquet that's spin-friendly, get one with an open string pattern (16 or fewer mains) and one with a low weight (around 11 oz). Adding lead to the handle will make your frame more stable, can make the racquet feel a lot lighter and will not be as hard on your wrist if you use SW/weak western like I do. The less weight in the head, the better. Just remember, the more mass an object has, the harder it is to accelerate, which means harder to create topspin. So to answer your question, Adding lead to the head of your racquet is counterproductive to adding spin because of the big increase in SW and the HH nature of the racquet WILL injure your wrist eventually if you use a modern forehand.

movdqa
07-11-2010, 08:11 AM
If you're only trying to generate spin, then yes, go lighter.

If you want to generate spin and pace, I think you need more mass. I like the KPS88 because the mass and stiffness provide the pace while I focus on generating spin.

hrstrat57
07-11-2010, 08:22 AM
IMHO spin is generated more by technique(closing racquet face/ grip / low to high stroke etc) than weight of the stick.

An open string pattern like those found in a Prestige Pro or a POG for example will also greatly facilitate the ability to create top or slice on groundies.

I use 18x20 Head frames exclusively now and I can create heavy top but it requires more focus on grip, technique and high racquet head speed.

I hit a bit the other day with my Prince Equipe 95's and topspin came much easier....but the feel of the ball off the frame of the prestige vs the Prince is worth the tradeoff for me.

I also always lead all my frames at 3/9 except the i prestige....the caps provide enough weight distribution to make lead not needed. I also upgrade to a leather grip or add weight in the handle as well.....

So, in a nutshell if I wanted more spin of the ground then I can create with my 18x20 frames I would try a Prestige Pro. For now, my technique is good enough to roll the ball over when needed.

If you can create enough speed in your stroke I might give a Prestige Pro a whirl.

Curious also as to what model of 80's stick you are finding better for your game....perhaps we could recco a more modern equivalent....

I think a more clear understanding of your game and type of stroke you employ consistently might result in a more useful response.

String is a factor as well but less so than string tension IMO....a loosely strung stick can make it very difficult to hold the ball long enough on the stringbed to spin it excessively.

Take advantage of the TW demo program to find a better choice of frames for you.

Kevo
07-11-2010, 11:08 AM
I'd throw in with Steve. Weight in the handle adds stability and preserves spinability of the frame. Putting lead in the head reduces your ability to quickly turn the frame up the back of the ball. Of course all this is relative, but you should give it a try and see how it feels to you.

I've tried both ways on various racquets, and I seem to always come back to most of the weight in the handle. The exception for me is super light frames. Those pretty much require the weight up top to make up for the overall light weight.

Don't Let It Bounce
07-11-2010, 03:09 PM
Does anybody care to comment on the difference between a leaded heavier racket verses a genuinely born to be heavy racket?I wondered the same thing but was unable to find a specific comparison on TT. Since then, I've had the chance to see (feel, really) for myself, with a Prince Spectrum Comp and a Prince Tour Diablo MP.

It takes just a little lead at 10 & 2 to bring the Spectrum's wt and SW up to ~350, and it takes quite a bit (spread from 9:00 to 3:00 and at the top of the grip) to bring the Diablo to the same wt and SW, with similar balance. The overall effect (and I think this is the real answer to your question; it generalizes to all such comparisons) is that lead concentrates mass far more than it would be concentrated by the layup of a racquet that's heavy in stock form. This is desirable to touring pros because of the effects of concentrating mass in particular areas (e.g., maximizing twistweight with mass at 3 & 9, maximizing swingweight-to-wt ratio with mass at 12, etc.) This will usually mean that mass is more polarized (this means 'distributed more toward the ends') in the more leaded racquet, unless you were to make the odd choice of loading it up at its balance point.

My own subjective experiences: both racquets felt great, and both had what I would call plow-through. That's to be expected; they had near-identical specs. However, if they were both precision rifles, the Diablo would be a high-powered rifle. One can actually feel at contact that the weight is shifted more to the ends, instead of being a more uniformly distributed mass. It brought more power to groundies and serves (the same kick serve, I noticed in particular, kicked quite a bit more up and to the right), and it's not the sort of power that one pays for by sacrificing precision. The volley didn't feel any more solid, and in fact I could easily see some players preferring the Spectrum at the net. (This makes sense: depolarized frames are often associated with S&Vers, and the racquet is moved more as a unit and less with a swing on volleys compared to other strokes.)

I lurvs me some Spectrum Comp, but even as a S&Ver myself, I can do more with a similar frame whose weight distribution is more polarized. So, I guess I see why the trend among top players has gone in that direction in the time since manufacturing techniques have allowed frames that are strong enough for it (and since the decline of S&V as a primary strategy).

EDIT: I forgot to mention but was reminded by a discussion in a similar thread that a more polarized weight distribution also raises the sweet zone higher.