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Xx PGX!
07-12-2010, 05:57 PM
I've been playing for about 7 months now and I feel that I have improve a LOT in just the past 2 months. I play 4-5 times a week. I'm a all-round court player, prefer hitting hard from the baseline with lots of spin, descent slicing and like to approach the net when possible. Prefer sticks ranging from 11.0 - 12.0 oz in weight and 98-100 sq in head size (haven't tried any smaller and hate OS). I know most of you will say that I'll should start with with any cheap racquet and that it wouldn't make any difference. But, I know and (feel) that I'm improving very fast on my technique and wont mind spending $200 on a racquet.

Racquets that I've demoed:

Babolat Aeropro drive GT
Head Youtek Prestige MP
Babolat Pure Drive GT
k Blade 98
Head Youtek Extreme MP
BLX Pro Open
Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300
Wilson BLX Six One Tour


The ones I liked the most (From most liked to least):

K Blade 98
Babolat Aeropro Drive GT
Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300

Any more suggestions and/or narrowing of my list of "most liked racquets" would be appreciated. Thanks :)

TennisCJC
07-12-2010, 06:57 PM
The 3 you liked the most are all good. The Dunlop is a little light and you could get more power and stability with a little lead tape. I have demo-ed Boris Becker rackets in the past and liked them. You may want to try the new BB Delta Core London and BB Delta Core Pro. Both of these have specs in your range. Also, the Volkl PB Mid+ (or light version of same racket) might be worth a demo. I demo the heavier Volkl and almost bought - very nice racket.

Agent Orynge
07-12-2010, 10:59 PM
I feel that descent slicing is the best way to go, since an ascending ball is certainly going to fly long.

I don't know if most of us would tell you to start with a cheap racquet, but I certainly will. It's clear that you don't understand the reason for this. It's not because you don't currently have the skill to play with an expensive racquet. In fact, the price of the racquet has nothing to do with it's performance, and many player's racquets can be found in the TW liquidation section. The reason I advocate cheaper frames for beginners is because newer players don't yet understand the principles of racquet characteristics, how those characteristics impact their game, and haven't developed an individual sense of taste for certain specs. What happens if you buy a frame with an open string pattern, and decide you want a closed one? What are you going to do when you realize you like softer racquets after you buy one that's pushing 70 RA? If you're serious about your gear, you're going to switch frames as soon as you develop a personal sense of taste. Why waste money under the misconception that you're going to play better if you spend more $$?

new_tennis_player
07-12-2010, 11:24 PM
Also, keep in mind that you'll want two racquets if you play 4-5 times a week, which would mitigate against your spending $200 for a single one.

0d1n
07-13-2010, 05:55 AM
I think you are on the right track. I would add demos for the LiquidMetal Radical and a Head Instinct (also Liquidmetal if you can find one).
Those are cheap, and similar in many ways to the kblade you've liked. You may even be able to buy 2 of those for the price of one kblade.
You'll thank me later :).

mike53
07-13-2010, 07:13 AM
Also, keep in mind that you'll want two racquets if you play 4-5 times a week, which would mitigate against your spending $200 for a single one.

Indeed, you will need at least two (mostly) identical sticks so the cost can really add up fast. I would never pay over $100 for a racquet and there is more good stuff available in that price range than we can ever hope to buy. If you liked the Dunlop 300, the previous version without the AG notation is selling for $80. I'm thinking to get that one myself.

Xx PGX!
07-13-2010, 12:58 PM
Great Suggestions!! thanks

Xx PGX!
07-13-2010, 01:01 PM
The 3 you liked the most are all good. The Dunlop is a little light and you could get more power and stability with a little lead tape. I have demo-ed Boris Becker rackets in the past and liked them. You may want to try the new BB Delta Core London and BB Delta Core Pro. Both of these have specs in your range. Also, the Volkl PB Mid+ (or light version of same racket) might be worth a demo. I demo the heavier Volkl and almost bought - very nice racket.

Thank you! I will try out some of the Boris Becker racquets, they look promising. And I've had the Volkl PB Mid in mind lately so thats a must demo.

Xx PGX!
07-13-2010, 01:10 PM
I feel that descent slicing is the best way to go, since an ascending ball is certainly going to fly long.

I don't know if most of us would tell you to start with a cheap racquet, but I certainly will. It's clear that you don't understand the reason for this. It's not because you don't currently have the skill to play with an expensive racquet. In fact, the price of the racquet has nothing to do with it's performance, and many player's racquets can be found in the TW liquidation section. The reason I advocate cheaper frames for beginners is because newer players don't yet understand the principles of racquet characteristics, how those characteristics impact their game, and haven't developed an individual sense of taste for certain specs. What happens if you buy a frame with an open string pattern, and decide you want a closed one? What are you going to do when you realize you like softer racquets after you buy one that's pushing 70 RA? If you're serious about your gear, you're going to switch frames as soon as you develop a personal sense of taste. Why waste money under the misconception that you're going to play better if you spend more $$?

Never saw it that way. I guess I may have to get around playing with as much racquets as I can to try different spec, the open/closed patterns etc..
Im getting tired of demoing though :???:

Also, keep in mind that you'll want two racquets if you play 4-5 times a week, which would mitigate against your spending $200 for a single one.

Whats the durability of a brand new racquet?
I think you are on the right track. I would add demos for the LiquidMetal Radical and a Head Instinct (also Liquidmetal if you can find one).
Those are cheap, and similar in many ways to the kblade you've liked. You may even be able to buy 2 of those for the price of one kblade.
You'll thank me later :).If they play as excellent and smooth as the k blade 98 I would thank you personally lol.



Indeed, you will need at least two (mostly) identical sticks so the cost can really add up fast. I would never pay over $100 for a racquet and there is more good stuff available in that price range than we can ever hope to buy. If you liked the Dunlop 300, the previous version without the AG notation is selling for $80. I'm thinking to get that one myself.

Whats the name of the racquet?? Dunlop 4d 300?

aangstman01
07-13-2010, 01:34 PM
The Dunlop Aerogel 300 is the name of the racket that is going for $80...on a different site...anywho I was and still am in the same position as you are and trying to decide exactly what i want in a racket, and you mentioned earlier that you would like a racket from 11-12 ounces, and that is a huge range. I used to think the same thing, but i got a 12 oz racket and liked some things about it, but mostly found out that i couldn't swing it effectively for more than an hour and a halfso i learned that i like a racket around 11.4-11.6 oz. which is a much more specific range when it comes to what you want and need. I currently have 2 of the previously mentioned Dunlop Aerogel 300's and 2 of the Dunlop Aerogel 500 Tour's. Both rackets are very light stock, but i have had fun playing with lead and seeing what i can get from a racket, so like Agent Orynge was saying just go cheap, demo, and find what you like in a racket. The Aerogel 300 is a good place to start, and if you want more power try the aerogel 500 tour it has a bigger head and is stiffer for more pop, it all depends on how you feel about the racket and what maximizes your potential. So, good luck and let us know what you find.

new_tennis_player
07-13-2010, 01:35 PM
I don't have any scientific data to back any claims; I wish I did.

Anecdotal evidence tells us that graphite racquets last indefinitely. There's a pretty active subforum on classic rackets which suggests older graphite rackets hold up very well over time, even when they are used consistently.

After you demo, get a couple of the ones you really like.

Whats the durability of a brand new racquet?
If they play as excellent and smooth as the k blade 98 I would thank you personally lol.

Agent Orynge
07-13-2010, 06:56 PM
Never saw it that way. I guess I may have to get around playing with as much racquets as I can to try different spec, the open/closed patterns etc..
Im getting tired of demoing though :???:


Demoing is the single best thing you can do for yourself right now. Just remember that it does you no good to make up your mind about a racquet without understanding why it played the way it did. Once you understand what makes any given frame different from the next you can narrow your next demo choices markedly, and you can make up your own mind with less input from all the biased consumers here.

Slazenger07
07-14-2010, 11:26 AM
I think you'd really like the Slazenger Pro X-1. It is 12 oz., 95 sq" and has a head light balance.

The precision with this racquet is better than any other Ive ever played with and the spin potential is very very good.

Its also lights out good at the net, this is where it excels and this could really help you with your all-court game I think. I think you'll be amazed at the level of control you'll have on the volley.

Its a demanding stick but so are many of those you demoed so I think it would be right up your alley!

Another plus is you can typically find it cheap at auction sites or you can find it on a particular site for discontinued racquets which I cant mention or Ill get banned.

Being that its discontinued its a little hard to find but I just bought a brand new one from a site a few weeks ago so its out there!

Id strongly recommend you give it a shot, I personally believe it is the best player's stick to come out in the past decade.

That pretty well sums up why you should check it out!

Xx PGX!
07-14-2010, 04:52 PM
I think you'd really like the Slazenger Pro X-1. It is 12 oz., 95 sq" and has a head light balance.

The precision with this racquet is better than any other Ive ever played with and the spin potential is very very good.

Its also lights out good at the net, this is where it excels and this could really help you with your all-court game I think. I think you'll be amazed at the level of control you'll have on the volley.

Its a demanding stick but so are many of those you demoed so I think it would be right up your alley!

Another plus is you can typically find it cheap at auction sites or you can find it on a particular site for discontinued racquets which I cant mention or Ill get banned.

Being that its discontinued its a little hard to find but I just bought a brand new one from a site a few weeks ago so its out there!

Id strongly recommend you give it a shot, I personally believe it is the best player's stick to come out in the past decade.

That pretty well sums up why you should check it out!

I'll Definitely have a look at it. Although, I just tried the Volkl PB 10 MID and I instantly fell in love with it. The precision and feel of the racquet is just AMAZING, as well as the ground-strokes and volleys. The top-spin generated from this racquet is excellent and to be honest I made some shots that I've never done before. I know many of you agreed on me buying two cheap racquets, but I just gotta have this racquet on my hands as soon as possible lol.

Thank you guys soo much for your recommendations, very supportive. Thank god I found this forum :)

Xx PGX!
07-14-2010, 04:55 PM
The 3 you liked the most are all good. The Dunlop is a little light and you could get more power and stability with a little lead tape. I have demo-ed Boris Becker rackets in the past and liked them. You may want to try the new BB Delta Core London and BB Delta Core Pro. Both of these have specs in your range. Also, the Volkl PB Mid+ (or light version of same racket) might be worth a demo. I demo the heavier Volkl and almost bought - very nice racket.

TennisCJC, the Volkl PB 10 Mid became #1 on my list of favs. Hopefully I'll buy it this weekend. Thank you so much.