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overgrip
07-14-2010, 05:23 PM
I recently tore my rotator cuff in a fall. Probably can't be fixed surgically because I had it repaired 15 years ago. I had been hitting with a 98" Dunlop under 11 oz, but it required a long swing. I now have to adjust my strokes to avoid hurting the shoulder. The ads for Pro Kennex Kinetic Pro 7G specify "good for shoulder problems." I need feedback, i.e. is this just hype or should I consider this stick. I's 11.7 oz, 100 sq in. and priced reasonably enough. Should I be looking at a heavier racket to compensate for a shorter swing.

OldButGame
07-14-2010, 05:45 PM
My understanding is that MOST of the Prokennex racquets are helpful with bad shoulders. You could also look at softer strings,...less tension,....regular 'maintenance exercises' (ala physical therapy stuff),....ice after matches,.....use of antiinflammatories both natural and OTC,....and enough rest between matches. Theres lots of other really good threads on topics like this...

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=337624

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=179256


http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=337688

Good Luck!!!!!:)http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/images/icons/icon14.gif

TheRasha
07-14-2010, 09:58 PM
Prince O3 White great for arm problems

120mphBodyServe
07-14-2010, 10:34 PM
The reason why you have shoulder problems is you used way too light a racquet and you've overworked your shoulder in producing excessive racquet head speed.
So you tore your rotator cuff twice and you don't think it can be fixed? I think medicine has progressed quite a bit in the last 15yrs.
Seek medical attention ASAP, get surgery if you need it, rest your shoulder and get on a rehab program with some weight training...
And start taking bromelain.

overgrip
07-15-2010, 02:40 AM
My thanks to those of you who posted racket suggestions. One post was off topic in offering medical opinions and reasons my shoulder was injured. I stated I tore it in a fall....has nothing to do with how I hit, how I train. I CAN play; I just want to try a racket that will minimize the chances of messing up the shoulder.

Tim
07-15-2010, 05:14 AM
The Volkl or Becker V1 are good for more power without feeling too stiff. If you can find an older Catapult version those are even better. For a more traditional feel the Aerogel 4d 300 is worth a hit, if you string with soft strings and lower the tension around the 50 pound range you can get a nice balance of power and control without having to swing too hard. I think the real goal in playing with an injured shoulder is to get a racquet set up that allows you to generate your pace without having to swing to hard and that can be accomplished by either using a moderately powered racquet like the 4d 300 with low string tension or a higher powered stiffer racquet the generates its power without a long swing naturally. If you use a heavy flexible racquet it is definitely a benefit for things like tennis elbow or tendinitis but you have to use a long full swing and I think in your case that is more detrimental than the soft feel make up for.

charliefedererer
07-15-2010, 05:45 AM
The Volkl or Becker V1 are good for more power without feeling too stiff. If you can find an older Catapult version those are even better. For a more traditional feel the Aerogel 4d 300 is worth a hit, if you string with soft strings and lower the tension around the 50 pound range you can get a nice balance of power and control without having to swing too hard. I think the real goal in playing with an injured shoulder is to get a racquet set up that allows you to generate your pace without having to swing to hard and that can be accomplished by either using a moderately powered racquet like the 4d 300 with low string tension or a higher powered stiffer racquet the generates its power without a long swing naturally. If you use a heavy flexible racquet it is definitely a benefit for things like tennis elbow or tendinitis but you have to use a long full swing and I think in your case that is more detrimental than the soft feel make up for.

You make a good point about the power generation being less on a flexible racquet from ProKennex (or the relatively flexible Volkl and Dunlop frames you mention). But the OP may still be better off medically if he can handle the weight with a racquet that is heavy enough to disperse the shock in the frame rather than having it transmitted down his arm to his shoulder. The sacrifice in power may be worth it to continue hitting and playing, even though his match results may not be as good. (Although some/many find better placement easily compensates for decreased power.)

Tim
07-15-2010, 06:24 AM
You make a good point about the power generation being less on a flexible racquet from ProKennex (or the relatively flexible Volkl and Dunlop frames you mention). But the OP may still be better off medically if he can handle the weight with a racquet that is heavy enough to disperse the shock in the frame rather than having it transmitted down his arm to his shoulder. The sacrifice in power may be worth it to continue hitting and playing, even though his match results may not be as good. (Although some/many find better placement easily compensates for decreased power.)

Indeed that may be the case, I was speaking from my own experience with a rotator cuff problem and playing with a prestige classic mid. I found it just too easy to need to swing harder and the heavy swing weight is hard on damaged tissue. From the heavy flexible end of the range I believe the Volkl C-10 pro would be the racquet to try or possibly the ProKennex Heritage Type C Redondo, but I think the flexibility in the hoop is what gives the Volkl that really soft feel.

ab70
07-15-2010, 06:39 AM
I have tried several ProKennex frames after shoulder surgery...

1) KI5 the softest in my opinion but you do need to swing hard, so some days when my shoulder feels tired or late in the match I switch back to my old PD with natural gut at 50 and power comes effortlessly;
2) Ki15PSE still heavy but more power and somewhat stiffer than Ki5. excellent for 2HBH and crisp volleys. Great for serves and still feels a bit heavy on FH;
3) KI20PSE lighter than other 2 and stiffer but still takes vibration away nicely and generates a lot of pop so you don't need to swing hard;
4) I only played 1 set with Ki5x (longer version) and I think it is pretty similar to Ki15PSE but slighly softer and easier to generate power than regular Ki5;

I own KI5 at the moment and thinking of getting the second ProKennex racquet to replace my PD for the days when I need more power. I tried other flex frames Head Radical, Dunlop and nothing comes close to ProKennex in terms of dealing with vibration.

Irvin
07-15-2010, 06:57 AM
http://www.racquetresearch.com/complete_idiot.htm

Irvin

Tim
07-15-2010, 08:39 AM
http://www.racquetresearch.com/complete_idiot.htm

Irvin

A quick note on the racquet research, it is a few years out of date and though the idea behind the research is correct it doesn't take into account the more modern style of tennis. If you do swing a racquet like the old wood ones using no wrist whatsoever than you need the weight for the momentum but most players these days use quite a bit more wrist in their shots. Additionally, that research is for preventing injury whereas overgrip is playing while he is injured. So take that info with a grain of salt.

coloskier
07-15-2010, 01:36 PM
A few things for shoulder problems....

1. Flexible racket
2. Absolutely no poly string
3. Good shoulder stretches before playing and after.

new_tennis_player
07-15-2010, 01:52 PM
How was your physical therapy? Did they offer you good exercises to strengthen your shoulder muscles and your upper body muscles?

Your entire body works as a unit, however, so strengthening shoulder muscles is part of it. General upper body strength is another element. Then there's lower body strength.

And in order to make use of your strength, you have to have good flexibility.

So, a proper regimen of physical fitness: strength training, cardio and stretching is mandatory for anyone who wants to minimize injury, but especially for those who've already suffered a significant injury. Hope that helped.

My thanks to those of you who posted racket suggestions. One post was off topic in offering medical opinions and reasons my shoulder was injured. I stated I tore it in a fall....has nothing to do with how I hit, how I train. I CAN play; I just want to try a racket that will minimize the chances of messing up the shoulder.

overgrip
07-15-2010, 03:14 PM
Thanks to the 12 of you who responded to my post. Your input has been very helpful to me. I think I've narrowed my selection down to Pro Kennex Pro 7g and Volkl C-10; probably the Volkl since it's bit heavier. Soft string at a lower tension looks like the way to go. These boards are a great source of info. We should all appreciate it.