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View Full Version : Racquet suggestions for a player returning after a seven year illness...


ph0n33z
07-16-2010, 02:38 PM
Alrighty,

I am coming off of a seven year severe illness that left me unable to do any physical activity let alone tennis. Before becoming ill I played frequently and was getting quite good. (Probably 3.5-4.0). In January of this year I had gotten well enough to start working out a little. Since going to the gym six months ago I have gained 24 lbs and am healthier than I have been since i first got sick.

So this is where you guys come in. Due to my illness being chronic, I will always be more susceptible to injury and pain than your average player. So the most important quality in a racquet for me is how it affects my body. In other words, the easiest racquet on my shoulder, arm, wrist and forearm moves to the top of the list.

As far as my game is concerned, I'm a tall guy who has had four reconstructive foot surgeries. So I'm not going to be your Nadal type who sprints all over the court. Think more Davenport..... but a guy. :) Since I just started again I don't know what kind of game I will be playing.

Essentially, I need a racquet that is easy on my body and will allow me to learn the game and discover the type of player that i am. I don't want to injure myself using the cheap Walmart racquet i have now before i even get a chance to play well!

So what do you guys think?

My stats if interested:

24 years old
6'3"
182lbs

Meriko
07-16-2010, 03:18 PM
Alrighty,

I am coming off of a seven year severe illness that left me unable to do any physical activity let alone tennis. Before becoming ill I played frequently and was getting quite good. (Probably 3.5-4.0). In January of this year I had gotten well enough to start working out a little. Since going to the gym six months ago I have gained 24 lbs and am healthier than I have been since i first got sick.

So this is where you guys come in. Due to my illness being chronic, I will always be more susceptible to injury and pain than your average player. So the most important quality in a racquet for me is how it affects my body. In other words, the easiest racquet on my shoulder, arm, wrist and forearm moves to the top of the list.

As far as my game is concerned, I'm a tall guy who has had four reconstructive foot surgeries. So I'm not going to be your Nadal type who sprints all over the court. Think more Davenport..... but a guy. :) Since I just started again I don't know what kind of game I will be playing.

Essentially, I need a racquet that is easy on my body and will allow me to learn the game and discover the type of player that i am. I don't want to injure myself using the cheap Walmart racquet i have now before i even get a chance to play well!

So what do you guys think?

My stats if interested:

24 years old
6'3"
182lbs
I would recommend something very flexable, such as a Head Youtek Radical MP or Wilson K Blade Team

Icedorb217
07-16-2010, 04:01 PM
Head MG Rad MP cheaper and softer than the YouTek

Hapless
07-16-2010, 04:06 PM
Wilson 6.1Team (K-Factor version can be found on clearance), Dunlop 300 (Aerogel or M-Fil if you can find one)

T-ennis 888
07-16-2010, 04:13 PM
Glad you are feeling well enough to play and more importantly, are better healthwise in general.

The MG Rad MP isn't a bad stick by any means, though having tried it once I'd maybe recommend you also demo the Yonex RdiS 200 and/or the Dunlop 4D 300 Tour too. Try each one for about 7-10 hours straight and if possible don't alternate between them when you demo.

If you want something with a slightly smaller head you can't go wrong with the Volkl PB10 mid or the Yonex RDiS mid - again demo and see what tickles your fancy.

Good luck!

ph0n33z
07-16-2010, 08:01 PM
Glad you are feeling well enough to play and more importantly, are better healthwise in general.

The MG Rad MP isn't a bad stick by any means, though having tried it once I'd maybe recommend you also demo the Yonex RdiS 200 and/or the Dunlop 4D 300 Tour too. Try each one for about 7-10 hours straight and if possible don't alternate between them when you demo.

If you want something with a slightly smaller head you can't go wrong with the Volkl PB10 mid or the Yonex RDiS mid - again demo and see what tickles your fancy.

Good luck!

Thanks for the advice guys.

7-10 hours straight?????? I cant play for that long lol.

Larrysümmers
07-16-2010, 08:11 PM
Thanks for the advice guys.

7-10 hours straight?????? I cant play for that long lol.

then it doesnt sound like you are that dedicated ;) :)

i say something really flexy and with natural gut i think that would be best

what did you play with before?

ph0n33z
07-16-2010, 08:39 PM
That was a typo, right? Lol. I doubt the pros even practice that long.

I used to play with a Volkl C10 (pretty sure that was the model.) it was very easy on the elbow and shoulder.

Steve Huff
07-16-2010, 08:47 PM
Phon33z--drop me a line sometime. I was in a situation very similar to yours. Not something really to discuss on these boards though. May be able to suggest a few frames also. stmt@comcast.net

ph0n33z
07-17-2010, 08:00 AM
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I'm filing up my cart with demos as we speak. :)

I have the Dunlop 4D 300, Head MG Radical Midplus and the Yonex RdiS 200. What do you think my fourth should be? Volkl? Wilson?

ph0n33z
07-17-2010, 08:03 AM
What about the ProKennex Ki5?

Hi I'm Ray
07-17-2010, 08:28 AM
The Yonex and Dunlop 4D 300 don't feel quite as soft as their flex numbers indicate. I would say the number are misleading as they felt somewhat stiff to me, especially the 300. I suggest you check out the Volkl V1 Classic which is extremely comfortable even compared to my super flexible racket. The Becker V1 is more flexible but not nearly as dampened as the Classic.

Hi I'm Ray
07-17-2010, 08:32 AM
I haven't hit with a Kinetic Pro Kennex in about 10 years but I do remember it was also very comfortable.

ph0n33z
07-17-2010, 08:27 PM
You know what? Now that I think about it, my old racquet was probably a V1 and not a c10. Man I miss that girl. :( It was lost during a move three years ago.

ollinger
07-18-2010, 10:03 AM
What was the illness? One can make more sensible recommendations if your vulnerabilities ("I will always be more susceptible to injury") are known.

Djlpenguin
07-18-2010, 11:26 AM
Alrighty,

I am coming off of a seven year severe illness that left me unable to do any physical activity let alone tennis. Before becoming ill I played frequently and was getting quite good. (Probably 3.5-4.0). In January of this year I had gotten well enough to start working out a little. Since going to the gym six months ago I have gained 24 lbs and am healthier than I have been since i first got sick.

So this is where you guys come in. Due to my illness being chronic, I will always be more susceptible to injury and pain than your average player. So the most important quality in a racquet for me is how it affects my body. In other words, the easiest racquet on my shoulder, arm, wrist and forearm moves to the top of the list.

As far as my game is concerned, I'm a tall guy who has had four reconstructive foot surgeries. So I'm not going to be your Nadal type who sprints all over the court. Think more Davenport..... but a guy. :) Since I just started again I don't know what kind of game I will be playing.

Essentially, I need a racquet that is easy on my body and will allow me to learn the game and discover the type of player that i am. I don't want to injure myself using the cheap Walmart racquet i have now before i even get a chance to play well!

So what do you guys think?

My stats if interested:

24 years old
6'3"
182lbs

I thought Davenport was a man...
Anyway, the K Blade Team is a great racquet. If you want something with a smaller head the Exo Rebel 95 is also phenomenal. Don't go GT, that stuff if super stiff. I recently switched from a Pure Drive GT to the Rebel due to wrist and shoulder problems. The GT's feel unstable to me too, that cortex thing isn't totally awesome like people make it out to be. But then again an AeroPro Drive might feel unstable if you've been playing the the Rebel. Before you play stretch out your wrist and shoulders. :)

Djlpenguin
07-18-2010, 11:27 AM
Oh, and even though the Pure Storms are "flexy", they feel hollow like all the others.

David

ph0n33z
07-18-2010, 01:50 PM
What was the illness? One can make more sensible recommendations if your vulnerabilities ("I will always be more susceptible to injury") are known.

It's called fibromyalgia. In short, it's a musculoskeletal neurological disorder that causes severe pain in the muscles throughout the body. (In addition to a lot of other stuff like on going dizziness, nausea, fatigue, etc,) So in the case of Tennis, my muscles dont take to change very well and tend to flare up much more quickly than a regular person's would. This also means that any repetitive stress from say, a stiff racquet, will most likely end badly for me.

ph0n33z
07-18-2010, 02:48 PM
Are all of these racquets good for a beginner? The reviews I read seem to suggest they are for intermediate to advanced players. I'm not that good yet since I've only played 3 times so far. Are these ok to learn on?

This is what has been suggested thus far:

Wilson K Blade Team
Head MG Rad MP
Dunlop 4D 300 Tour
Yonex RdiS 200
Volkl V1 Classic
Prince Exo Rebel 95

ollinger
07-18-2010, 04:35 PM
Well, the good news is that it's not clear that fibromyalgia actually exists as a distinct illness. You've no doubt heard this before. It's one of the major controversies in clinical medicine, as there's no objective (pathology, lab findings, etc.) evidence of fibromyalgia's existence, the symptoms are very non-specific and overlap many psychiatric conditions, and many believe it's perhaps a variant of depression. Your suggestion that you are over a "seven year illness" is curious as fibromyalgia, if it exists, is believed to be chronic. Now that fibromyalgia has spawned an industry (Lyrica, Neurontin, Cymbalta......) it's taken on kind of a life of its own.

ph0n33z
07-18-2010, 04:42 PM
Well, the good news is that it's not clear that fibromyalgia actually exists as a distinct illness. You've no doubt heard this before. It's one of the major controversies in clinical medicine, as there's no objective (pathology, lab findings, etc.) evidence of fibromyalgia's existence, the symptoms are very non-specific and overlap many psychiatric conditions, and many believe it's perhaps a variant of depression. Your suggestion that you are over a "seven year illness" is curious as fibromyalgia, if it exists, is believed to be chronic. Now that fibromyalgia has spawned an industry (Lyrica, Neurontin, Cymbalta......) it's taken on kind of a life of its own.

This isn't exactly the place to discuss the intricacies of my medical history and present condition but i appreciate the concern. To clarify, I'm not over it. I have just improved to such a level so as to be well enough to play. I'm well aware of the controversies and the labor it has as well as how many who are not truly ill are diagnosed with it as a kind of catch all. If you are interested in discussing it more just pm me.

ph0n33z
07-19-2010, 03:24 PM
Are all of these racquets good for a beginner? The reviews I read seem to suggest they are for intermediate to advanced players. Who have already developed or established their strokes. I'm not that good yet since I've only played 3 times so far. Are these ok to learn on and develop?

This is what has been suggested thus far for arm-friendly racquets:

Wilson K Blade Team
Head MG Rad MP
Dunlop 4D 300 Tour
Yonex RdiS 200
Volkl V1 Classic
Prince Exo Rebel 95

Bump since the thread now spans two pages.

agassi fan
07-19-2010, 04:12 PM
why not a ProKennex , they are the best for shoulder comfort and tennis elbow. string that up with a nice multi and enjoy your hitting.

ph0n33z
07-19-2010, 04:44 PM
why not a ProKennex , they are the best for shoulder comfort and tennis elbow. string that up with a nice multi and enjoy your hitting.

I forgot to write that. I was planning on demoing that one as well. The Ki5 to be exact.

Do you think that and the other racquets are ok to learn on? Its been so long since i played that I am basically starting from square one again and need to relearn the basic fundamentals of the strokes.

agassi fan
07-19-2010, 05:36 PM
i think the rebel is a bit too hefty if your gonna start from scratch. i would definetely give the prokennex a try and you may want to also look into the head radical lie. maybe a lm radical mp or oversize, easy on the arm and very easy on the pocket. also, i heard somewhere that synthetic replacement grips are a lot better for arm comfort so you might wanna make that something to look into, if your a leather grip user. i hope you find a racquet that you can continually play tennis with and good luck in your tennis endeavors. :)

ph0n33z
07-23-2010, 02:35 PM
Alrighty,

Well after some thought (and browsing through the available demos on TW), I have selected four racquets to test! They are:

Head Liquidmetal Radical MP
Head Microgel Radical MP
Yonex RDS 001 MP
Volkl DNX 10 Mid

Yea, the last one is a bit out of place with its tiny head (90sqi I think), but its weight, flex and balance was pretty similar to the others. (And the price is great at $110!) I am going to be testing them out all of this week and writing up my thoughts here. I hurt my thumb last Friday (being an idiot by using too small of a grip and holding my grip as if I was squeezing the life out of the racquet) so I won't be able to play as much as I would like. However, I should still get a general idea.

So which two should I test out first? :)

Oh, and what are some tips for demoing racquets? What are the do's and don'ts?