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View Full Version : Racquet frame loses feel with use.


flargosa
07-16-2010, 05:37 PM
Guys, I was reading an article today on this months issue of head Tennis magazine, might have been a different magazine. In it Sorana Cristea had a Q&A. She says that she changes her 6 racquets every six months because it starts to lose feel. So if she plays 5 hours a day she would have put 150 hours on each of her racquets before it starts to lose feel. Now I feel that my older racquets are no good. oh well, just wanted to share what I read, I thought it was interesting.

pyrokid
07-16-2010, 06:37 PM
If it didn't affect you before, it won't know that you know about it.

MarrratSafin
07-16-2010, 06:54 PM
They do lose feel- but that is affected by the amount of stringing done on the frame and not hours of play. And pros have their frames restrung very frequently. For us, probably want to just play until it cracks.:-?

Roy Hobbs
07-16-2010, 06:56 PM
Guys, I was reading an article today on this months issue of head Tennis magazine, might have been a different magazine. In it Sorana Cristea had a Q&A. She says that she changes her 6 racquets every six months because it starts to lose feel. So if she plays 5 hours a day she would have put 150 hours on each of her racquets before it starts to lose feel. Now I feel that my older racquets are no good. oh well, just wanted to share what I read, I thought it was interesting.

She may feel the difference, but you or I may not be that sensitive. Many pros change racquets with every change of balls during a match. They believe they can tell the difference in tension. Can you? I can't. Remember also that pros not only hit for several more hours per day than most of us, but that they on average hit with more force. In addition, they restring all the time. They're putting a lot of stress on their frames. I don't think we can equate our experience. Your racquets are probably fine. Enjoy them!

cork_screw
07-17-2010, 08:39 AM
I think this is more of psychological thing than an actual thing. I bet you if you did a blind test of a new racquet and a racquet 6 months or older and she wouldn't know which was which, both with the same string jobs, tension. She wouldn't be able to tell the difference. She's not calibrated like a robot to the point where she can pick up those minute details in the difference of a racquet. Honestly, I think your body breaks down more than a racquet does. I think she could be confusing her strings for what she says about the racquet. Strings will have adverse effects on your game if you don't replace them. Racquets don't have that same effect. And if they did, are you going to buy new ones every 6 months? Is it worth it if you're not making money on a professional level?

flashfire276
07-17-2010, 07:03 PM
Well, they're sponsored and rich (somewhat). They can afford to have over 500 racquets in their career (Roddick has a bit more than that).

Kevo
07-17-2010, 09:08 PM
Racquets do get a bit softer over time, but I actually like that since I like more flexible frames. I think that once they get broken in, they tend to stay the same for a long time unless they weren't made well and end up cracking and having structural issues.

It really varies quite a bit from frame to frame and player to player. There's no hard and fast rule on this. I personally hope to keep my current frames for many years. So far they are holding up nicely.

lcstringer
07-17-2010, 10:23 PM
This is more true for men than women since they hit and string their frames a lot more than the ladies. However, it is true, racquets get so many cracks because of stringing that they become "noodles" so to speak. It can be easily tested by doing an RA test on an RDC. More cracks less power, but a lot more feel. There are players that actually jump on racquets to make them "softer". Some players give their sticks to friends to break them in, before playing with them themselves.

new_tennis_player
07-17-2010, 10:41 PM
What's an RA Test? Actually the OP states that the pro believes the racket loses rather than gains feel, however that's defined.

Perhaps the pro means the racket becomes less stiff, in which losing and gaining feel mean the same thing.

I really want to see the data though, particularly for recreational users who string infrequently.

lcstringer
07-17-2010, 10:48 PM
An RA test will show the stiffness of a racquet. Done with a Babolat RDC.
Recreational players' frames will not be affected to the same level because their racquets are not strung every day like the pros' and are not used 4-8 hours daily.
A softer racquet gives you more feel and less power. A stiffer racquet provides more power and less feel. And this is without throwing in the strings.

new_tennis_player
07-17-2010, 10:51 PM
This should result in a more arm friendly racket over time? All else being equal of course.