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View Full Version : Playing with 2 different racquets - throw your game off?


MLtennis
07-20-2010, 02:55 PM
Hello, so I bought (and love) 2 Volkl PB10 Mids to go with my 2 Head Prestige MP's - and the other day I played with the Volkls for the first time and hit everything long. I switched today and went back to the Head's and now hit them all long as well. I'm sure a lot of this is just me however, it made me wonder how I should best play with both racquets. I love each racquet for different reasons. Any advice?

I see a lot of people's sigs that show mutliple racquet types so I'm hpoefull a lot of others do this and wonder if you have issues when switching often or if there's advice to be had.

Cheers!

pyrokid
07-20-2010, 03:14 PM
I play with my radicals, and keep my PSLs in storage for in case my style changes enough they help me.

when I switched sticks a lot, everything about my game was worse. Just stick with one. I know it sucks, but it helps in the long run.

sfleming
07-20-2010, 03:34 PM
If the different rackets have similar stringing patterns (18x20 or 16x19) and similar weighs and balance points changing rackets will not be a problem!

If you watch the ball, and don't think about the notion of using a different racket you should be fine!

OldButGame
07-20-2010, 04:18 PM
I'm very guilty of this ,.....i am switching constantly,...i'm not sure why,....i guess each time it seems kind of 'novel' or 'new',....and brings that 'fresh new racquet excitement'. However i DO realize that each time i'm often spending games or even a set or two,.....reacquainting myself with the racquet i use that day. It hurts my game in that respect, and i give away a lot of games, sets, matches that way. BUT I still enjoy it !!!!!....and i still have fun switching around!!!!!....:)

Tahsin1982
07-20-2010, 05:06 PM
I am also doing this, at the moment I am switching between the Pro Kennex Black ace 98 and YTPMP. Both rackets are different but they tend to work for me on days on how my fitness fare on court.

MrFlip
07-21-2010, 12:27 AM
Depends on the weight and balance. You should have your strokes, and all else being equal, they should only be slower (or faster) depending on those attributes listed.

new_tennis_player
07-21-2010, 01:11 AM
It depends on how similar the specs are. Within classes, the transition from one racket to the next is pretty easy (1 OS to another). But switching between classes (OS to midplus) is going to be a bit less graceful.

You're better off using one racket and having multiples in your bag. If you're fiddling around for recreation it really doesn't matter though.

forthegame
07-21-2010, 02:32 AM
Well, I think having 2 different racquets might affect your game negatively.

You have to choose which racquet suits your play at any one time. Yesterday, I chose the wrong racquet and lost 2 sets. Switched to my other racquet and won that set 6-1!

I'll still keep them both because one seems to work for me indoors while the other is better outdoors.

I was playing relatively soft hitters who sliced and never missed and only got the better of them when I switched to my heavier, more spinny racquet.

My lighter racquet worked better for me the day before when I was playing a big hitter and couldn't generate head speed well enough with my heavier one.

My 2p, YMMV.

BC1
07-21-2010, 05:38 AM
I'm guilty of this too (playing with multiple racquets). And I agree with all the posters so far - In general, it is not good. Not only for your game, but mentally. When I go to play a match and have two or three different racquets in the bag I'm constantly finding myself thinking about which racquet would be better against this opponent, or which racquet is better for me this particular day (depending on how I feel physically, etc). So, I'm thinking about the equipment rather then what I need to do to improve my strokes, footwork, strategy, etc. And that's bad.

Sometimes a switch during a match works to my advantage as I "seem" to start playing better which increases my confidence and everything starts to fall into place. However, more often then not, the racquet doesn't make a difference over the course of a set, and I'm forced to face the reallity that it is all up to "me", not the racquet(s).

I am having a very hard time narrowing it down to which racquet to stick with, and I am in the process of trying to sell a couple of them to prevent me from going back and forth. Months ago I came to the conclusion to stick with the racquet that provides the most control and consistency. So that is my intent (unfortunatly I still have two that fall in that category).

A good tip until you narrow your collection down - When going to play a serious match, only bring one racquet (and a back-up just incase your strings break, but leave it in the car). Anyway, by only bringing one racquet with you, you won't have the option of going back and forth, or wondering which racquet is best. You will be forced to just play tennis instead of obsessing over the equipment.

Gee
07-21-2010, 06:05 AM
I'm guilty of this too (playing with multiple racquets). And I agree with all the posters so far - In general, it is not good. Not only for your game, but mentally. When I go to play a match and have two or three different racquets in the bag I'm constantly finding myself thinking about which racquet would be better against this opponent, or which racquet is better for me this particular day (depending on how I feel physically, etc). So, I'm thinking about the equipment rather then what I need to do to improve my strokes, footwork, strategy, etc. And that's bad.

Sometimes a switch during a match works to my advantage as I "seem" to start playing better which increases my confidence and everything starts to fall into place. However, more often then not, the racquet doesn't make a difference over the course of a set, and I'm forced to face the reallity that it is all up to "me", not the racquet(s).

I am having a very hard time narrowing it down to which racquet to stick with, and I am in the process of trying to sell a couple of them to prevent me from going back and forth. Months ago I came to the conclusion to stick with the racquet that provides the most control and consistency. So that is my intent (unfortunatly I still have two that fall in that category).

A good tip until you narrow your collection down - When going to play a serious match, only bring one racquet (and a back-up just incase your strings break, but leave it in the car). Anyway, by only bringing one racquet with you, you won't have the option of going back and forth, or wondering which racquet is best. You will be forced to just play tennis instead of obsessing over the equipment.

Very good advise., BC! I completely agree with you.

Last week I played 1 set with my new PB10 Mid and the second set with my regular TF335. I won both sets with 6-1. So it wasn't the racquet but my opponent. ;-)

pyrokid
07-21-2010, 06:49 AM
My doubles partner recently started doing this in matches. It gets really annoying. He'll start off with one, play badly, and go
"Grr, it's not me, it's this infernal racquet,"
And then switch.
about a point later, he got an overhead, and he hit it in for a winner. No surprise there. However,
"SEE ADAM! it is the racquet!"
the people we were playing with just kind of grimaced.

Edberg
07-21-2010, 06:54 AM
Play with one, learn all of its nuances then if you don't like it try the other one. My point is give yourself time to fully adapt to it before you abandon it. Its probably user error anyways.

coachrick
07-21-2010, 07:17 AM
I love telling this story...after moving back to Atlanta from a two-year exile as a sales rep in NC, I still had over a half-dozen different rackets in my bag(mostly Kennex demos). We made it to the summer ALTA Mixed City Finals(AA2, IIRC) and my partner and I take the court. I look at my menagerie and exclaim "Hey, I haven't hit with this one in a loooong time! I'll give it(Micro Mid proto) a try!" My partner's jaw dropped! Of course, I can only tell the story because we WON the match!

JackB1
07-21-2010, 07:22 AM
Switching can't possibly help. You get used to the angle off the racquet and the swingweight and power and when you switch you have to reaclimate. I have 2 racquets I am currently deciding between, but I will use one for a week or so and not switch mid-match. They are both weighted and balanced similarly, but in the long run I will benefit from sticking with one model.

Bud
07-21-2010, 07:25 AM
I love telling this story...after moving back to Atlanta from a two-year exile as a sales rep in NC, I still had over a half-dozen different rackets in my bag(mostly Kennex demos). We made it to the summer ALTA Mixed City Finals(AA2, IIRC) and my partner and I take the court. I look at my menagerie and exclaim "Hey, I haven't hit with this one in a loooong time! I'll give it(Micro Mid proto) a try!" My partner's jaw dropped! Of course, I can only tell the story because we WON the match!

That must'a been'a trip! Playing with a PK Micro Mid for the first time... and during a tournament :)

Keifers
07-21-2010, 07:30 AM
For me, the key to being able to switch sticks successfully within a match or hitting session is to have their balances be pretty much the same. If they're not, my timing is thrown off -- bad results.

MrAWD
07-21-2010, 07:36 AM
People have tendency to find different reasons why something is not going the way they would like to see it. The same goes in tennis! They love to say that they lost the match because strings where too loose/tight and grip was too small/big or...you see the pattern. Now with different racquet there is another excuse to be added to the list!!

Now, of course, not all of the people out there are there to find excuses from the different equipment they use, and some of them are just trying to find what is better for them. But there is a catch here!! If you change too many things too often, you are not helping your self at all!! The thing is by switching between different sticks you are playing with different equipment all the time. Think about how much difference thee is in your hitting angle when you are serving to dictate whether ball is going down the line or middle of the box! Or, a foot too long or too short? These are such a subtle differences that you have to have a great feel for this in order to use it during the game. Once you start switching, you are basically trying to tune to the new stuff all the time, so it is very hard to find the base for your shots.

I believe it is very important to use your stick the way it is for a bit longer first and then after you are in tune with it try to do some small changes and then try them for a while too!! The thing is it take a while for you to get a feel from the modification that you just did and hitting for an hour or so is usually not enough to really get the differences between the variations.

Fedja

007
07-21-2010, 07:51 AM
I rarely use the same frame on consecutive days, as I have 4 different models of frames I love to play with. I always have two strung up. I play with whichever I feel like at the time. I'll bring two different frames to league matches. If I break a string the other frame comes our....whatever make/model it happens to be. I'm a 4.5+ and can adapt to the other frame quickly/easily. It's really no big deal. The specs all are very close, which is why the range of frames is no problem to play with. That's the key, I believe. Sure, there are minor feel, spin and power differences but at this level it's no biggie.

coachrick
07-21-2010, 08:00 AM
That must'a been'a trip! Playing with a PK Micro Mid for the first time... and during a tournament :)

Yeah, it was an all black prototype...looked pretty cool with a zillion gold colored strings in it! Still have it and hit it from time to time.


For those who believe they must choose ONE racket and stick with it...there's something to be said for consistency; BUT, I feel I have a real advantage being able to adapt to different rackets, strings, tensions, etc from all my years of testing rackets, trying new models, choosing rackets for the shop, selling for 4 different marques, etc. Does that mean I wouldn't have two 'matching' rackets when entering a match...of course not. But, given the variety of elements present during a hitting session, having the 'perfect' racket is down the list of my concerns. How about the balls(brand, type, fresh vs 10 games used), wind, court surface, humidity, OPPONENT. Do I need to have absolute consistency in the racket bag? Not the way I play!

I had a long-time stringing client/friend who would play with whatever he could get his hands on. A high-A, spin monster type of guy, the most he would ever say about using completely different rackets, strings, grip sizes, etc. was "You know, I liked that one a LITTLE better than the other". Then, he would take one of the 'others' and play fine with it! Why chocolate OR vanilla? How about BOTH chocolate AND vanilla!?! :)

coachrick
07-21-2010, 08:04 AM
I rarely use the same frame on consecutive days, as I have 4 different models of frames I love to play with. I always have two strung up. I play with whichever I feel like at the time. I'll bring two different frames to league matches. If I break a string the other frame comes our....whatever make/model it happens to be. I'm a 4.5+ and can adapt to the other frame quickly/easily. It's really no big deal. The specs all are very close, which is why the range of frames is no problem to play with. That's the key, I believe. Sure, there are minor feel, spin and power differences but at this level it's no biggie.

THERE ya go! Well said!

Keifers
07-21-2010, 08:29 AM
I rarely use the same frame on consecutive days, as I have 4 different models of frames I love to play with. I always have two strung up. I play with whichever I feel like at the time. I'll bring two different frames to league matches. If I break a string the other frame comes our....whatever make/model it happens to be. I'm a 4.5+ and can adapt to the other frame quickly/easily. It's really no big deal. The specs all are very close, which is why the range of frames is no problem to play with. That's the key, I believe. Sure, there are minor feel, spin and power differences but at this level it's no biggie.
Great post, 007.

I'm curious to know which 4 sticks you keep around. And would you please indicate their (similar) weight and balance?

pyrokid
07-21-2010, 08:32 AM
I rarely use the same frame on consecutive days, as I have 4 different models of frames I love to play with. I always have two strung up. I play with whichever I feel like at the time. I'll bring two different frames to league matches. If I break a string the other frame comes our....whatever make/model it happens to be. I'm a 4.5+ and can adapt to the other frame quickly/easily. It's really no big deal. The specs all are very close, which is why the range of frames is no problem to play with. That's the key, I believe. Sure, there are minor feel, spin and power differences but at this level it's no biggie.

You can adapt and play near as well, but not as well as if you'd played with the same frame for say, a year.

BC1
07-21-2010, 10:20 AM
pyrokid - looking at your signature - why 6 racquets of each frame? Do you keep them all strung and play with them all? or are you saving some for later?
Just curious, and a little envious :)

pyrokid
07-21-2010, 10:24 AM
pyrokid - looking at your signature - why 6 racquets of each frame? Do you keep them all strung and play with them all? or are you saving some for later?
Just curious, and a little envious :)

I'm still in HS, and so I have summer break now.


But because it's summer, I play every day, usually about 3 matches a day. So I usually end up breaking all my strings by the end of the week. But during tournaments it's nice to have the extras, because I almost always have one or two at the stringers. However, last tourny, I ran out and had to use another person's racquet, so that's why I got 2 more. :)

I only really play with my radicals, my PSLs are just for later in case I have a massive change in playing style.
So my PSLs are for later, but all my rads are strung.

BC1
07-21-2010, 10:30 AM
I'm still in HS, and so I have summer break now.
I only really play with my radicals, and I have 2 more coming...

But because it's summer, I play every day, usually about 3 matches a day. So I usually end up breaking all my strings by the end of the week. But during tournaments it's nice to have the extras, because I almost have one or two at the stringers. However, last tourny, I ran out and had to use another person's racquet, so that's why I got 2 more.


Wow! 3 matches a day, every day! Now I'm definitely envious - Except for your stringing expenses - Ouch!

pyrokid
07-21-2010, 10:47 AM
Wow! 3 matches a day, every day! Now I'm definitely envious - Except for your stringing expenses - Ouch!

Actually, these last few weeks, it's gone down to 2 or average... More people are going on vacation.

Stringing expenses aren't bad, because cyberflash is like $5 a set, and my stringer likes me, so he gives me a huge discount. ($12 down to $6) Plus, I've started stringing at 48 lbs lately and it's gotten me about an extra half hour.
But yeah, I have to keep a job or else it won't be happening, heh.

007
07-21-2010, 12:29 PM
I have:
- 2 x Slazenger Pro X1's
- 1 x Yonex Ti 80
- 1 x Yonex RDiS 100 MP
- 1 Fischer VT98 Pro 330g

All weigh between 12 (X1) and 12.2 (VT98 Pro) ounces strung, range from 8 (VT98 Pro) to 12 points headlight (X1) with swingweights between 315 (X1)and 330 (VT98 Pro).

Not trying to sound cocky or anything, but at my level (4.5+) different frames with similar specs is a non-issue. I love them all BECAUSE they play similarly, yet slightly differently. I am good enough to adapt + enjoy them all at the drop of a hat.

Analysis by paralysis IMO. I enjoy frames, so I have a few different ones.

pyrokid
07-21-2010, 01:24 PM
I have:
- 2 x Slazenger Pro X1's
- 1 x Yonex Ti 80
- 1 x Yonex RDiS 100 MP
- 1 Fischer VT98 Pro 330g

All weigh between 12 (X1) and 12.2 (VT98 Pro) ounces strung, range from 8 (VT98 Pro) to 12 points headlight (X1) with swingweights between 315 (X1)and 330 (VT98 Pro).

Not trying to sound cocky or anything, but at my level (4.5+) different frames with similar specs is a non-issue. I love them all BECAUSE they play similarly, yet slightly differently. I am good enough to adapt + enjoy them all at the drop of a hat.

Analysis by paralysis IMO. I enjoy frames, so I have a few different ones.

I don't think anyone else assumed your frames were so similar, that wouldn't be too bad between.
I was thinking like the difference between my radicals and PSLs.
Not an absolute TON, but enough to make a difference in a really close match.

Keifers
07-21-2010, 01:49 PM
I have:
- 2 x Slazenger Pro X1's
- 1 x Yonex Ti 80
- 1 x Yonex RDiS 100 MP
- 1 Fischer VT98 Pro 330g

All weigh between 12 (X1) and 12.2 (VT98 Pro) ounces strung, range from 8 (VT98 Pro) to 12 points headlight (X1) with swingweights between 315 (X1)and 330 (VT98 Pro).

Not trying to sound cocky or anything, but at my level (4.5+) different frames with similar specs is a non-issue. I love them all BECAUSE they play similarly, yet slightly differently. I am good enough to adapt + enjoy them all at the drop of a hat.

Analysis by paralysis IMO. I enjoy frames, so I have a few different ones.
Thanks for the info. I'm completely willing to believe what you say about the non-issue-ness of switching between frames. At my 4.0+ level, the adjustment takes a little longer, but I, too, enjoy having a few favorite sticks available and ready to go.

I played some very enjoyable sets recently with a PK Composite Destiny -- 95", 12.5 ozs, 9 pts HL, terrific stick.

Still looking forward to hitting with a VT98 Pro 330g one day..

MLtennis
07-21-2010, 09:04 PM
Wow! Thanks so much for all the great advice and experiences. I think I'll take both sides seriously (play both or just one) - I'm a 3.5 and closing in on the 4.0. I think I can definitely benefit from playing the one racquet style and making sure I don't lose consistency by switching too often - and I'd never want to switch in the middle of a match. It's more that I like both and would want to play one racquet (the Head or the Volkl) for a couple days and then switch back. That said, I need to look more at the specs of my racquets and try to equalize them a bit to minimize the differences some so the shock isn't as great.

Thanks again - I dig this board so much.

Cheers!

pyrokid
07-21-2010, 09:25 PM
also, just a thought, but I don't really think the ease of changing racquets has anything to do with level. So don't worry about that.
Pretty much ever kid I hit with can do it without a problem, and they range from 4.0-5.0. It could just be a youth thing though.

NLBwell
07-21-2010, 09:26 PM
I've got original Kennex Black Aces (early 1980s, 86 sq.in.) and Microgel Prestige Pros. For tournament and league matches I use the Prestiges, but I play with the Black Aces a lot. I play somewhat differently depending upon which racket I'm using. With the Prestiges with poly (especially lux) strings, I get more spin and can hit dipping shots that I can't hit with the Black Aces with multis. When playing with the Black Aces, I get more power (heavier racket, multi strings) and hit flatter. It's good for me to practice with both, though I usually don't switch between them during matches unless I'm just having fun. (I will switch between the Prestiges because of string differences).

Cup8489
07-21-2010, 10:35 PM
my two cents:

I've been messing around with racquets alot for the last year, and recently pulled out the old POG mid, the only one i have left. I felt at ease playing with it, like an old friend... and I realize now that sticking with one stick is always the best thing. demo or whatever to find one that you like the feel of, and then stick with it. if oyu're playing crappy, its not the racket's fault, its you.. keep that in mind.

blipblop
07-22-2010, 06:53 AM
i have 4 different types of rackets all yonex, 1 of them is my "main" (rds 002 tour SL), 2 i use rarely (rdis 100 mid and rd-7), and 1 i never use (rd-ti 70 mid).

mostly within 5g of each other in weight, 5pts in balance. SW i'm not exactly sure, i think my main rackets have the highest. sometimes if i am playing or "coaching" an inferior player, i will take the lead and some overgrips off of one racket.

i think rotating use of different rackets can be ok, provided that you have played with them before. then again who would use a stick they never played in a competitive match? i think choosing between 2-4 different sticks you are familiar with on a given day is reasonable. i wouldn't want to stare in my bag forever deciding which of my 10 to use though.

mostly, as long as the weight, balance and SW are similar, i think most players will be fine. that is the biggest factor that determines if your swing is early/late. of course there is a whole mental aspect. i.e. "oh this is a different racket i have to change my swing now." even if you really don't have to adjust that much.

the rest is a difference of torsional stability or feel, which can also play tricks on the mind. in the end, i think the differences between different rackets within 5-10% variance in weight, balance, and SW with the same string/tension is basically a similar difference to exactly matched rackets with different string/tension. and people change strings all the time.

mike53
07-22-2010, 07:03 AM
My doubles partner recently started doing this in matches. It gets really annoying. He'll start off with one, play badly, and go
"Grr, it's not me, it's this infernal racquet,"
And then switch.
about a point later, he got an overhead, and he hit it in for a winner. No surprise there. However,
"SEE ADAM! it is the racquet!"
the people we were playing with just kind of grimaced.

I hate to admit it and I apologize in advance, but I do this myself. I carry four of the (almost) identical racquet, each with minor differences in customization that anyone other than myself would probably need a research lab to detect.

When things are not going well (which is more often than I would like), I pull out another racquet that has some combination of minor differences in string tension, grip/overgrip, balance/weight or whatever. All the while I keep trying to convince myself that this change is going to make the difference. Once I get back on track, I completely forget any of this ever happened.

xolair
07-22-2010, 08:41 AM
I'm 50 years old and a 3.0 in skills.
I have been playing with 2 different Babolat racquets: Aerostrike and Pure Drive OS 110.
On days when I don't feel particularly strong or sharp, I go with the PDOS for more power on my serve and less mishits on volleys.
I actually like the more flexible feel of the Aerostrike so I try to start with it and later switch to the PDOS if necessary.
One day last week, I played with a Pure Drive Roddick Plus and my arm/wrist hurt for 2 days afterwards!
I actually like the control of the Pure Storm the best, but my techniques and strength aren't up to par to allow me to use this racquet with confidence.
I'm glad to find that I'm not the only one who is having a hard time deciding.

fuzz nation
07-22-2010, 10:25 AM
I'd say, in part as a result of these different responses, that it goes different ways for different players. Some work better without varying their gear while others enjoy a little variety. I like to advise players to avoid any distraction with their gear, but I think that this can work both ways here.

If you keep with one sort of racquet, then there's nothing to figure out there aside from string type and tension. I usually find that a certain racquet works with one setup for me where the right stuff at the right tension gives me the feel and response that's... "right". I don't go for the idea of using different tensions for more power or more control in my gear. Either the feel is right or it's not - that's just me.

I do have a few different frames that I really love though, and I can use each of them with confidence. Some days where I'm a bit depleted, I might be distracted by the heft of my heaviest racquet and swap it for a slightly lighter option for quicker handling. Distraction erased. I've also seen days where I felt like I had the yips on the court and actually settled down nicely after switching to a heavier option. I don't know about you guys, but I can feel like a significantly different player from one session to another and if my favorite racquet feels awful, it can be a big help to have a kinder, gentler alternative handy.

Keifers
07-22-2010, 10:49 AM
...

I do have a few different frames that I really love though, and I can use each of them with confidence. Some days where I'm a bit depleted, I might be distracted by the heft of my heaviest racquet and swap it for a slightly lighter option for quicker handling. Distraction erased. I've also seen days where I felt like I had the yips on the court and actually settled down nicely after switching to a heavier option. I don't know about you guys, but I can feel like a significantly different player from one session to another and if my favorite racquet feels awful, it can be a big help to have a kinder, gentler alternative handy.
Yes, very well said, fuzz nation.

For league and tournament matches, I keep my stand-by 1 stripe POG OS handy. Just knowing that I have it in my bag is a big help.

Ross K
07-22-2010, 11:49 AM
I have:
- 2 x Slazenger Pro X1's
- 1 x Yonex Ti 80
- 1 x Yonex RDiS 100 MP
- 1 Fischer VT98 Pro 330g

All weigh between 12 (X1) and 12.2 (VT98 Pro) ounces strung, range from 8 (VT98 Pro) to 12 points headlight (X1) with swingweights between 315 (X1)and 330 (VT98 Pro).

Not trying to sound cocky or anything, but at my level (4.5+) different frames with similar specs is a non-issue. I love them all BECAUSE they play similarly, yet slightly differently. I am good enough to adapt + enjoy them all at the drop of a hat.

Analysis by paralysis IMO. I enjoy frames, so I have a few different ones.



007,

Ha, ha, classic mate :wink: .... love your style... you, Sir, are an inspiration to racketaholics the world over!:)

R.

JackB1
07-22-2010, 11:58 AM
I don't know about you guys, but I can feel like a significantly different player from one session to another.....

I know what that's like :)

namui
07-22-2010, 05:56 PM
I used to be very sensitive to the racquet and hence needed to play with a specific racquet strung with a specific type of string at certain tension. I was bummed when the string breaks, even if I had another racquet of the same model.
For two years now, I have adapted to switching racquets. It was difficult at the beginning. But nowadays, I have 5 racquets in my bag, comprising 4 different models. Weights range from 340 g to 364 g, and balance from 3 pt to 8.5 pt. I can switch even between points. I have finally learned to hit with techniques that are not tied up with a specific racquet. This is quite fun to play.
BUT one thing these racquets of mine have in common is they all have similar swingweights. And still, one of the racquets will be my favorite for certain period of time (this will last for weeks). And I'm still bummed when the string of the favorite racquet breaks.
As a reference, I'm between 4.5 and 5.0 (from tournament results).

MayDay
07-22-2010, 11:52 PM
I got 3 different rackets in the bag. Gravitating to the PB10 mid most of the time. Probably shouldn't have strung up the other 2 (Pure Control Team & POG mid) - feel like I should hit with them or else be wasting the string job. I do feel the difference between the rackets, but I don't have much issue adapting.

Head Youtek
07-23-2010, 04:15 AM
Hello, so I bought (and love) 2 Volkl PB10 Mids to go with my 2 Head Prestige MP's - and the other day I played with the Volkls for the first time and hit everything long. I switched today and went back to the Head's and now hit them all long as well. I'm sure a lot of this is just me however, it made me wonder how I should best play with both racquets. I love each racquet for different reasons. Any advice?

I see a lot of people's sigs that show mutliple racquet types so I'm hpoefull a lot of others do this and wonder if you have issues when switching often or if there's advice to be had.

Cheers!

Yes it will mess up your game.I was in a tournament 18u and i had won the 1st set 6-3 with the head youtek speed pro and i wanted to get more topspin so i started using my babolat aeropro drive cortex and i lost the next two set 3-6 1-6 stick with one racquet.

pingu
07-23-2010, 04:52 AM
I think if you are just a recreational player then it's fine to switch around, but if you're serious, it's better to find a racket that suites your style and stick with it.

fuzz nation
07-23-2010, 05:34 AM
For me, the key to being able to switch sticks successfully within a match or hitting session is to have their balances be pretty much the same. If they're not, my timing is thrown off -- bad results.

I'm in the same boat here. We don't always mention this aspect, but I've found that when the balances among my different racquets are rather close, I'll get a more predictable swing with each one, even if their static weights differ by nearly and ounce.

I've personally found "singles salvation" with more flexible racquets. They make it night-and-day easier for me to keep my strokes down on the courts. My stiffest racquet on the other hand (ProStaff 6.1 Classic) gives me unsurpassed performance for doubles and serve and volley singles. Since I haven't found one racquet that delivers superlative performance for me in every department, I've become quite cozy with my different frames since they all have good heft and similar balance.

coachrick
07-23-2010, 06:24 AM
Yes it will mess up your game.I was in a tournament 18u and i had won the 1st set 6-3 with the head youtek speed pro and i wanted to get more topspin so i started using my babolat aeropro drive cortex and i lost the next two set 3-6 1-6 stick with one racquet.


OOPS!

According to many strategy coaches, "Never change a winning game...always change a losing game". I 'never' like to speak in absolutes, personally. :)

Head Youtek
07-23-2010, 06:28 AM
OOPS!

According to many strategy coaches, "Never change a winning game...always change a losing game". I 'never' like to speak in absolutes, personally. :)

Yeah i learned my lesson. wont be switching racquets in matches anymore.
thanks for the little advice though
HY

Slazenger07
07-23-2010, 08:32 AM
Im one of those types of players that prefers consistency. I had four Pro X-1's until a few days ago when one of them broke. : (

Anyways I prefer to have them all strung with the same string at the same tension so i know exactly how the racquet will play from the start of hitting with it.

I like to know what to expect from my racquet, it makes playing well out there much easier.