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View Full Version : Dunlop 4D 200 Tour - only for pros?


Gasolina
07-20-2010, 08:48 PM
I'm only a rec player who plays 3x a week. Interested with the 200 Tours. I've read a bunch of reviews and comments from this board and a lot really liked the racquet but couldn't handle the high SW and eventually put the stick down. Some were actually suggesting not to get the racquet if you're not confident to handle the stick.

Question is, has anyone here, who is not a tour player, nor a pro, has had a 4d 200 tour and actually enjoyed hitting with it as their everyday racquet?

roundiesee
07-21-2010, 06:30 AM
It doesn't swing as heavy as the published specs; if you have a chance do demo this; it's really an excellent racket

Petra Martinnen
07-21-2010, 06:42 AM
New to this site? Be advised that here they review mostly "player" (advanced) type racket and have disdain for normal rackets for average players. Even PROS of note often do not even use what they tell YOU to use.

How many guys in top 12 use a 95" 18x20, 1? How many top 12 pro women use advanced "oldie" racket? 1, Dementieva! Stick to > 100 inch racket with a large sweetspot. Demo Prince EXO3 Red as one nice idea!

Gasolina
07-21-2010, 06:46 AM
Thanks for the responses. How about for serving, is it that hard to serve.

I demo'd the BLX 95's a while ago and was comfortable with the 337 SW for groundstrokes but was noticably slower in serving (although I could always get the ball in thanks to the plowthrough)

I demo'd the BLX Tours and CANNOT serve with it. For some reason I can't get up and over my shoulder fast enough to meet the ball. I usually end up hitting the ball with my racquet facing up because I was struggling with the "flip" motion.

Something doesn't make any sense. The Tours are only slightly heavier than the 95's. The 95's has an even higher SW than the Tour. I don't know what's in the Tour that makes it hard for me to serve with it.

0d1n
07-21-2010, 06:52 AM
New to this site? Be advised that here they review mostly "player" (advanced) type racket and have disdain for normal rackets for average players. Even PROS of note often do not even use what they tell YOU to use.

How many guys in top 12 use a 95" 18x20, 1? How many top 12 pro women use advanced "oldie" racket? 1, Dementieva! Stick to > 100 inch racket with a large sweetspot. Demo Prince EXO3 Red as one nice idea!

I'm not one who recommends stupidly demanding racquets to anyone, and if I were to nitpick ... I would say that Djokovic, Soderling, Del Potro all use the kind of racquet that you suggested...so there are 3 currently.
And that's only because Murray and Berdych recently switched to 16x19 string pattern albeit in the same racquet (Murray) or very similar one (Berdych) ;).

0d1n
07-21-2010, 06:54 AM
Thanks for the responses. How about for serving, is it that hard to serve.

I demo'd the BLX 95's a while ago and was comfortable with the 337 SW for groundstrokes but was noticably slower in serving (although I could always get the ball in thanks to the plowthrough)

I demo'd the BLX Tours and CANNOT serve with it. For some reason I can't get up and over my shoulder fast enough to meet the ball. I usually end up hitting the ball with my racquet facing up because I was struggling with the "flip" motion.

Something doesn't make any sense. The Tours are only slightly heavier than the 95's. The 95's has an even higher SW than the Tour. I don't know what's in the Tour that makes it hard for me to serve with it.

It's a different weight/balance/sw combination so your timing is different with it.
Also...it's about 8 grams heavier than the k95 (with tolerances ... it can get to 10-15 grams difference)...and you WILL feel a 10 grams difference in a tennis racquet even if it sounds negligible.

Gasolina
07-21-2010, 07:41 AM
Thanks, any more input on the serve of the stick would be welcome.

Keifers
07-21-2010, 08:03 AM
I was excited about the 4D 200 Tour when I first heard about it -- the thought of a heavier 200 with a 16X18 string pattern was very appealing. Then I read TW measured its sw as 352 and balance as 5 pts HL, and I was bummed.

One day, in a local store, I decided to see if I could find one that balanced more HL. Found one that was 7.5 pts HL strung -- and I had the stick I'd been looking for for a while. Good pop, excellent control and feel/touch, and it serves huge. (Much better for my game than the BLX 6.1 95.)

Ordering from TW, you can ask them to select the one in your grip size that is more HL than the others.

Keifers
07-21-2010, 08:19 AM
Re serves, I've found the AG and 4D 100s and 200s all serve beautifully. Others have said the same thing, and still others have said the 300s and 500s serve great as well.

Imo, the distribution of Aerogel material around the hoops of these frames has a lot to do with it -- providing a nice firm flex that also gives excellent feel. (4D adds a little more solid feel and stability.) Try it. I think you might be impressed.

cellofaan
07-21-2010, 09:27 AM
Imo, the distribution of Aerogel material around the hoops of these frames has a lot to do with it -- providing a nice firm flex that also gives excellent feel. (4D adds a little more solid feel and stability.) Try it. I think you might be impressed.

You're kidding right? There is no aerogel in tennisrackets. The manufacturing process of molding doesn't allow it in the first place.


They do serve beautifully though.

aggietex08
07-21-2010, 09:28 AM
If you had a hard time serving with the BLX Tour than serving with the 200 Tour would be nearly impossible. I was excited when it came out and gave it a demo. I felt it to be a silly stick in the end. Its less maneuverable than any other stick I've tried (even the KPS88). It felt oddly less stable than I expected it to be as well. If you are looking for a heavier friend with a small head size like the BLX Tour try the Volkl PB 10 mid if you havent. If you are wanting to stick with Dunlop try the normal 200 or the 100 if you want a smaller head size (though it is not as good as the BLX Tour or PB 10 mid imo)

Keifers
07-21-2010, 09:52 AM
You're kidding right? There is no aerogel in tennisrackets. The manufacturing process of molding doesn't allow it in the first place.


They do serve beautifully though.
You may well be right, cellofaan. :) I have no way of confirming. There is something about the design of these "Aerogel" racquets that makes them perform really well. I think of the 100s, 200s and 300s as thoroughly modern thin-, box-beam frames -- that outperform the older thin-, box beams such as the PS 6.0 95.

I think of the 200 Tour as a 95" version of the 1-stripe POG OS and I mean that as high praise.

LeeD
07-21-2010, 10:28 AM
I've been using Mfil and Aero200's for two years.
I've had some really fast serves in my long ago lifetime, but maybe barely hit the 110's nowadays.
Got to hit with 4D200 Tour 3 months ago. After 3 hours of play. Serves were interesting. Heavier than my sticks, easier to swing thru the air (less strings?). If you're strong enough to hit 3 hours with it, it is fine. If you're out of shape, weak, and can't explode well into the ball, it's heavy.
I'm 5'11" and 150, weak but explosive. Tour would tire me out.
OTOH, all my Mfils and Aeros say "TOUR SPECIFICATIONS" on the head.

Gasolina
07-21-2010, 10:47 AM
Wow thanks everyone for sharing what they know. It does seem that the 200 Tour is indeed for peeps who take their tennis seriously. Anyway, onward with the search.

GameSetMatch
07-21-2010, 10:55 AM
Not just for pros.

Slyvester Stallone uses one. Arnold Schwarzenegger apparently plays with one too.

bradsm01
07-21-2010, 12:26 PM
I just purchased one from another TW poster and can't wait for it to get delivered. I currently hit with the 4D 200 non-tour loaded up with lead tape and it feels super but I wondered how its heavier brother would feel especially since I typically prefer an open string pattern like the tour version. Once I get a few hours oncourt with the tour I will follow up with a good comparison review.

Gasolina
07-21-2010, 12:31 PM
I just purchased one from another TW poster and can't wait for it to get delivered. I currently hit with the 4D 200 non-tour loaded up with lead tape and it feels super but I wondered how its heavier brother would feel especially since I typically prefer an open string pattern like the tour version. Once I get a few hours oncourt with the tour I will follow up with a good comparison review.
Wow that's great. Since you lead up the 200 non-tour (stock form is very close to the one I'm using now), any feedback on the comparison would be super.

I mean, if you experience any kind of discomfort over the racquet, that'd mean A LOT of discomfort for me.

stronzzi70
07-21-2010, 07:29 PM
Im playing right now with Dunlop 4d 200 tour ,what I can say It is amazing frame, nice flex, amazing pace and plow, a dream for any serve ( flat, slice, kick), but is a little heavy, If you had some hard time with BLX 6.1 tour then this dunlop maybe is not for you.

Ptomin
08-13-2010, 10:13 AM
I'm only a rec player who plays 3x a week. Interested with the 200 Tours. I've read a bunch of reviews and comments from this board and a lot really liked the racquet but couldn't handle the high SW and eventually put the stick down. Some were actually suggesting not to get the racquet if you're not confident to handle the stick.

Question is, has anyone here, who is not a tour player, nor a pro, has had a 4d 200 tour and actually enjoyed hitting with it as their everyday racquet?

I'm pretty much a newbie to tennis...18 months in, never played before, play at 3.5 now. I started with a Bab Aeropro drive, Non GT..(great racquet, just felt a little "clunky" after my stroke started to develop). In my research for a new racquet I demoed several. I was getting caught up in the "spec" side of choosing racquet. I didn't demo this stick but ordered one anyway. All I can say is wow! It feels like a weapon in your hand. You feel like you can make any shot from anywhere. It's not nearly as "swing heavy" as the specs say. It's stable, secure and one can wield it all around. So even though it's suggested for high level players don't let that scare you away from this awesome stick. The harder you strike the ball, the more accurate and top spinney you get. I canít see ever going to another racquet.

Power Player
08-13-2010, 10:23 AM
I'm only a rec player who plays 3x a week. Interested with the 200 Tours. I've read a bunch of reviews and comments from this board and a lot really liked the racquet but couldn't handle the high SW and eventually put the stick down. Some were actually suggesting not to get the racquet if you're not confident to handle the stick.

Question is, has anyone here, who is not a tour player, nor a pro, has had a 4d 200 tour and actually enjoyed hitting with it as their everyday racquet?

I have regular 4d 200s and am a strong guy. It is definitley a challenging racquet at spec if you only play 3 times a week. I was playing 5 times a week with a healthy wrist, and it was great. But I am getting 6-8 hours a weeek in now, and that swingweight is too difficult on my timing.

You could easily honeymoon with that racquet, hit some bombs and think it is the greatest thing since sliced bread. But if you only play 3x a week, then you will end up wanting a lighter racquet. I would suggest trying something in the 11-11.6oz or so range with a swingweight under 335. That's just my opinion, but a lot of people like to bite off more then they can chew here and they won't come back and tell you when it doesn't work out.

For reference, I am non USTA rated, but the tennis instructors at my club said they'd throw me in a 4.5 tourney and expect me to do pretty well. A lot of the best guys I have seen hit use pretty light sticks like APDCs and Pure Drives and they are all at spec with no lead.

mtommer
08-13-2010, 11:13 AM
Wow thanks everyone for sharing what they know. It does seem that the 200 Tour is indeed for peeps who take their tennis seriously. Anyway, onward with the search.

Not necessarily. I use an M-Fil 200 at 381g, 8 points HL. I've never played any kind of organized/official competitive match. I can go for hours with my racquet. *shrug*

Kimosabi
08-13-2010, 12:18 PM
From the numerous sticks I have demoed the 200 Tour has been by far the best for me. Take my opinions with a grain of salt though, I'm 6'5 230lbs so I don't have much trouble with it. But, don't feel bad about using a lighter stick. With some they don't have to be over 12oz to feel solid and have plow through. If spin potential isn't an issue I would say try the 300 Tour.

Ross K
08-13-2010, 12:54 PM
I have regular 4d 200s and am a strong guy. It is definitley a challenging racquet at spec if you only play 3 times a week. I was playing 5 times a week with a healthy wrist, and it was great. But I am getting 6-8 hours a weeek in now, and that swingweight is too difficult on my timing.

You could easily honeymoon with that racquet, hit some bombs and think it is the greatest thing since sliced bread. But if you only play 3x a week, then you will end up wanting a lighter racquet. I would suggest trying something in the 11-11.6oz or so range with a swingweight under 335. That's just my opinion, but a lot of people like to bite off more then they can chew here and they won't come back and tell you when it doesn't work out.

For reference, I am non USTA rated, but the tennis instructors at my club said they'd throw me in a 4.5 tourney and expect me to do pretty well. A lot of the best guys I have seen hit use pretty light sticks like APDCs and Pure Drives and they are all at spec with no lead.

Hey PP... interesting, well put observations there... have to say, I think I largely agree... though I'd still like to hit with the Tour sometime, I imagine (unfortunately) I'd have the same take on it as yourself, especially as I've read it plays like a heavier PT630 or K95, and I can't comfortably wield frames like the PT630, PSC 6.1 or RD7 for 3 sets tbh. :(

R.

Power Player
08-13-2010, 01:06 PM
Lighter racquets under 12ozs are generally the most used by players who do not play tennis in college or professionally.

Meaning, you may take a break from the game..or get busy for a bit and tennis gets cut out a little.

If you are that majority of person then you don't need a stick that is super heavy. I don't care what anybody says on here. Now some guys like the one a few posts above me are really big and naturally can handle more heft.

I watch tournies and hit with guys at a 4.5-5.0 level and they all use lighter racquets. One guy has a Head Crossbow strung at 42#s and will crush about everyone here.

There are definite advantages to heavier sticks with a higher swingweight, but you need to log in a lot of hours of tennis every week to take advantage. If you can't do that, then you are much better suited staying with the stock weight of a racquet like an APDC for example.

mtommer
08-13-2010, 01:16 PM
There are definite advantages to heavier sticks with a higher swingweight, but you need to log in a lot of hours of tennis every week to take advantage. If you can't do that, then you are much better suited staying with the stock weight of a racquet like an APDC for example.

I don't know about this. Honestly I think it's simply all about personal comfort. I didn't set out to make my own sticks "heavy". It just turned out I liked them where they're currently at. I used to use the Ti Radical OS before my M-Fil 200. I loved that racquet stock spec even though most would see the two racquets as opposite ends of the spectrum when comparing them. If I could find them cheap enough I would still be using them.

Power Player
08-13-2010, 01:20 PM
You just said you don't play matches at all. So really it does affect you as much. If you are late on a shot, who cares..you probably will not even notice. Playing for hours is cool..I can do that with a super heavy racquet right now, but once point construction comes into play, it is a whole different game.

As much as I hated the lack of feel and control..plus the stiffness of my apdc, I never lost a match with it. It was light enough to give me that extra prep time I needed against heavy serves and bailed me out of tough points.

Kimosabi
08-13-2010, 01:25 PM
Biggest advantage of the heavier racquet for me comes down to serve returns and volleys. Having a hefty racquet against a big server makes a big difference IMO.

mtommer
08-13-2010, 01:26 PM
You just said you don't play matches at all. So really it does affect you as much. If you are late on a shot, who cares..you probably will not even notice. Playing for hours is cool..I can do that with a super heavy racquet right now, but once point construction comes into play, it is a whole different game.

Just because I've never played in an officially sanctioned match doesn't mean I've never played people; what most would consider good people at that. Frankly, hitting against the wall for a few hours at a time is more work than playing in a match, at least how I do it, and therefore I would "notice" the racquet more if it were going to happen.

Power Player
08-13-2010, 01:29 PM
Hitting against a wall and playing a match are so opposite that it is not even remotely close. You said you never played in matches. Not "Officially Sanctioned" matches, which really does not make any difference anyway. You either played matches or you did not. You said you did not, and now you say that you did.

But you have a right to disagree. Everyone can read what we both said and draw their own conclusions.

mtommer
08-13-2010, 01:46 PM
You said you never played in matches. Not "Officially Sanctioned" matches, which really does not make any difference anyway.

I said I never played in organized/official matches. "Officially Sanctioned" is saying the same thing. At any rate, I merely mentioned that as to many people here it does seem to make a difference. *shrug*. Maybe it does in terms of the effort you'll see against you overall. D' know, never having played in one.

Ross K
08-14-2010, 12:21 AM
Lighter racquets under 12ozs are generally the most used by players who do not play tennis in college or professionally.

Meaning, you may take a break from the game..or get busy for a bit and tennis gets cut out a little.

If you are that majority of person then you don't need a stick that is super heavy. I don't care what anybody says on here. Now some guys like the one a few posts above me are really big and naturally can handle more heft.

I watch tournies and hit with guys at a 4.5-5.0 level and they all use lighter racquets. One guy has a Head Crossbow strung at 42#s and will crush about everyone here.

There are definite advantages to heavier sticks with a higher swingweight, but you need to log in a lot of hours of tennis every week to take advantage. If you can't do that, then you are much better suited staying with the stock weight of a racquet like an APDC for example.

Again I find myself mainly agreeing with what is being said here...

Without wanting to side-line too much into a slightly different subject, I'd argue that for a heck of a lot of us (certainly among the UK Racketaholics guys, I know that for sure), are all after this mythical great frame that has many of the qualities of the very greatest player's racks but is in a slightly easier to wield package... quite what those specs are (or indeed what the frame is) are open to debate and are different for all of us; but, yes, I concur with PP's general train of thought.

And further to how much tennis one actually plays, there is also the matter of getting older, slower, etc. Which, for me, escalates the whole issue... as I discovered earlier this year when I spent a few months with the wonderful RD7... a truly great frame imo and very much one that fits a lot of my requirements... after 2 sets though, I just simply couldn't wield it properly, and especially against better players... later on in matches, I was always getting overwhelmed.

The only extra factors, for me anyhow, is that of head-light balance and stiffness/flexibility in throat/hoop... I have found that, irrespective to some degree of static weight, these are very important and have a big say on how I can like a racket.


R.


Qsn for PP - you lead up your old APD? If so, how much and where?

Power Player
08-14-2010, 08:22 AM
I sold my APDs and Rad Pros and moved to Dunlop in January. I have not really looked back. But I did get my apdcs leaded up when I had them. I wanted to control the power somewhat. They ended up getting super heavy and had even less feel.

I realized that I played best with the APDC at stock weight even though I'm strong and was playing a lot. I play with a big guy who hits huge shots with an APD and has never even thought of leading his stick. It kind of stuck in my head for a while. I think heavy racquets are nice, but can be overblown on here. If you are struggling with your game, the last thing you need is a heavy racquet. You need something that allows you to swing free and easy and get your stroke grooved. I haven't used a stick over 12ozs since January.

tennisntn3477
08-14-2010, 09:07 AM
Demoed the 200 Tour last night, and it's a really nice frame that feels/moves much lighter than expected from the specs. Good plowthrough, nice soft feel, serves and volleys well and no problems with being late. Was able to get the frame through the hitting zone on serve quickly enough for both good spin/direction. Expected it to feel more like Wilson K/Blx 90 in terms of movement but it is a much easier hit.

Woodersen
08-14-2010, 07:19 PM
The 4D 200 Tour definitely swings lighter than the 352 spec. In fact, having played with the Rebel 95 for so long, I felt the 4D 200 Tour was easier to swing than the Rebel. Very stable through the hitting zone and very soft feeling and good amount of control for an open string pattern. Seriously considering switching to this racquet.

BobFL
08-14-2010, 08:33 PM
I'm only a rec player who plays 3x a week. Interested with the 200 Tours. I've read a bunch of reviews and comments from this board and a lot really liked the racquet but couldn't handle the high SW and eventually put the stick down. Some were actually suggesting not to get the racquet if you're not confident to handle the stick.

Question is, has anyone here, who is not a tour player, nor a pro, has had a 4d 200 tour and actually enjoyed hitting with it as their everyday racquet?

I don't know about 4D200T but I will quote my friend who used to coach top30 player (had an epic match with Federer): 12oz is more than enough for anyone who doesn't play on the Tour." I agree 100% with this. I mean, why would you need that beast? On my level I am happy when I see someone with 12.6oz racquet because I know that he will get tired before me :) Seriously, everything above 12oz is just an overkill for mortals like us :) ...just my $0.02

Ross K
08-14-2010, 11:35 PM
I don't know about 4D200T but I will quote my friend who used to coach top30 player (had an epic match with Federer): 12oz is more than enough for anyone who doesn't play on the Tour." I agree 100% with this. I mean, why would you need that beast? On my level I am happy when I see someone with 12.6oz racquet because I know that he will get tired before me :) Seriously, everything above 12oz is just an overkill for mortals like us :) ...just my $0.02

Nice...........

Ross K
08-14-2010, 11:52 PM
The 4D 200 Tour definitely swings lighter than the 352 spec. In fact, having played with the Rebel 95 for so long, I felt the 4D 200 Tour was easier to swing than the Rebel. Very stable through the hitting zone and very soft feeling and good amount of control for an open string pattern. Seriously considering switching to this racquet.

Hang on!... hold the front page!!!... say what???!!!....:shock:

Okay... why didn't anyone say??!!... swings easier than the Reb?! :roll: ... hmmm... now, to me, the Reb swings a tad easier than, say, the PT630, PSC 6.1, and definitely the RD7, which could be very interesting...

Because these small differences in weight and balance etc do make for some crucial differences, could ppl please say how they think the AG4d200 Tour compares for ease in swinging with C10 Pro, N95 and Reb 95... because if ppl think they are very similar to swing and in terms of general maneuverability, maybe I should check it out afterall? All 3 btw are frames I've got on very well previously/presently...

TIA,

R.


Woodersen,

How does Reb and 200 Tour match up on serve iyo?

Woodersen
08-15-2010, 09:29 AM
Hang on!... hold the front page!!!... say what???!!!....:shock:

Okay... why didn't anyone say??!!... swings easier than the Reb?! :roll: ... hmmm... now, to me, the Reb swings a tad easier than, say, the PT630, PSC 6.1, and definitely the RD7, which could be very interesting...

Because these small differences in weight and balance etc do make for some crucial differences, could ppl please say how they think the AG4d200 Tour compares for ease in swinging with C10 Pro, N95 and Reb 95... because if ppl think they are very similar to swing and in terms of general maneuverability, maybe I should check it out afterall? All 3 btw are frames I've got on very well previously/presently...

TIA,

R.


Woodersen,

How does Reb and 200 Tour match up on serve iyo?

Strangely enough, even though the Rebel has a denser string pattern I felt like I got my spin on my serves with the Rebel than with the 200 Tour demo. However, that might also have something to do with my set up on the Rebel and the multi's they had on the 200 Tour demo.