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View Full Version : Anyone remember the Yamaha EOS


EDK
07-22-2010, 12:54 PM
Or any Yamaha stick for that matter? The EOS came out in the early 90s, I believe, shortly after the craze for "widebody" rackets. Back then it retailed brand-new for almost $300! -- not uncommon at the time for the "latest and greatest." This racket was remarkable for being extremely lightweight. It couldn't have been more than 11 ounces strung. It had a boxy beam, was midplus size (they also made an oversize), had a brown and gray paint fade similar to Head Pro Tour/Radical paintjobs from the 90s.

The swingweight on the racket was so light it was like swinging a piece of air, but it also had that built-in widebody power. It didn't have the stability of, say, a Yamaha Secret 04 (which appeared to be made out of volcanic rock), and it would twist on off-center hits. My brother ended up adding gobs of lead tape, still he would shank a lot of topspin drives.

You couldn't beat it for maneuverability. Kick serves were just illegal. I tried the oversize version years ago when I was getting back into tennis, that thing launched space missiles.

Mig1NC
07-22-2010, 04:13 PM
I had a Yamaha Secret EX 110. Best OS ever... Well, maybe not ever. But it is still one of my favorites. Shame I don't have it anymore.

Also had a Secret 06, but didn't play with it that much before I had to give up Tennis for more than a decade.

dekko1
07-22-2010, 11:52 PM
I used to play with the Secret EX MP, I loved that racquet; and just a few weeks ago I played with it again, it still is an awesome racquet.

Martingale
07-23-2010, 02:36 AM
Same here, sweet racket. Very stiff, but OK when strung with gut. I used it for years starting as a young teenager, and it won quite a few tournaments, not all by itself, but it helped. My wife picked up tennis a few years ago, and rather than buy a new piece of ...., she started her tennis on the Yamaha EOS, and she loves it! Maybe they were expensive, but with hindsight it is obvious that here was a good reason for the price tag: amazing craftsmanship, quality and longevity. Actually, I recently purchased at auction a pristine unused Yamaha Secret 4 Junior racket, so my sons may well grow up on Yamaha twenty years after they stopped producing any rackets!

fpipia
07-23-2010, 04:40 AM
I have played and continue to play with the Yamaha EOS MP since the early 90's. I was having trouble finding the frame online and decided to call Yamaha directly. To make a long story short, I was given the opportunity to purchase this frame fora "special price" of $50 a frame. I immediately purchased 6 frames. I should have purchased 10 frames. At the time I was a 5.0 player, ranked in the State of Virginia and was playing several tournaments a season. I am now down to 3 frames with one being severely cracked. This was an awesome frame and I am having trouble with both arm/elbow pain in my search to find a new frame after all these years. I was told by Yamaha that they stopped making and importing frames in the U.S. because they had infringed on someone else's patent. I wish I knew who that was as I would see if that frame were still in production.

Racquet Daddy
07-23-2010, 09:01 AM
When I started playing competitively in school around '91/'92, I played with a Yamaha. Can't remember which one. It was silver/gray. Might be my imagination, but I thought it had a rough, sandpaper-ish feel to the paintjob. Sweet racquet till it flew out of my hand on an overhead and cracked.

Don't Let It Bounce
07-23-2010, 01:49 PM
I was told by Yamaha that they stopped making and importing frames in the U.S. because they had infringed on someone else's patent. I wish I knew who that was as I would see if that frame were still in production.It was Wilson. The EOS was to the Secret as the Wilson Profile Hammer (later called the Hammer 2.7) was to the Profile. Wilson, however, got to the patent office first with the idea of taking weight out of the handle, so they were able to threaten a lawsuit that they would have won. Yamaha settled with them by agreeing to get out of the racquet business–a minor business for them anyway. (I don't know if the agreement was U.S. or worldwide, but they ended up out of the business worldwide anyway.)

EDK
07-23-2010, 10:46 PM
If I recall correctly, the EOS came out before the Profile Hammer. That's too bad about the patent, imagine where Yamaha would be now with their innovations had they stayed in the business.

fpipia
05-13-2011, 12:27 PM
I have 3 of the Yamaha EOS rackets you mentioned. I bought 6 at once back in the early 90's directly from Yamaha as the racket and Yamaha stopped making or selling rackets in the U.S. due to a patient infringement law suit. This information came directly to me from Yamaha. Anyway, the racket was even balanced at 10 oz. strung and still remains in my bag. I had the presence of mind to buy 20 sets of bumper guards and grommets as well which can not be found anywhere. I got an amazing price on the rackets and have had a difficult time adjusting to anything else for the last 20 years. BTW, EOS stood for efficiency of string weight.

Frank




Or any Yamaha stick for that matter? The EOS came out in the early 90s, I believe, shortly after the craze for "widebody" rackets. Back then it retailed brand-new for almost $300! -- not uncommon at the time for the "latest and greatest." This racket was remarkable for being extremely lightweight. It couldn't have been more than 11 ounces strung. It had a boxy beam, was midplus size (they also made an oversize), had a brown and gray paint fade similar to Head Pro Tour/Radical paintjobs from the 90s.

The swingweight on the racket was so light it was like swinging a piece of air, but it also had that built-in widebody power. It didn't have the stability of, say, a Yamaha Secret 04 (which appeared to be made out of volcanic rock), and it would twist on off-center hits. My brother ended up adding gobs of lead tape, still he would shank a lot of topspin drives.

You couldn't beat it for maneuverability. Kick serves were just illegal. I tried the oversize version years ago when I was getting back into tennis, that thing launched space missiles.