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spaceman_spiff
08-06-2010, 05:33 AM
Now, we've all played with a partner who couldn't run (slow, injured, etc.), and it's a bit frustrating. But, at least there's a reason for it, so it's not so bad.

Last night, I played with a guy who's actually quite fast, but he just wouldn't run; he kept giving up on stuff he was actually fast enough to run down.

For example, one opponent framed a BH return, which turned into a slow, sharp-angled ball landing in the alley. The bounce was high enough that my partner should have easily reached it, despite how wide it was. I my mind, I was thinking "Ooh, a perfect chance for an around-the-post shot!" But then, I didn't hear any foot steps. I looked back, and he was just standing there.

Later, I was coming to the net and tried to hit a cheeky DTL volley past the netman. He stabbed at it and managed to lob cross court. It was a good lob that should have put us on the defensive, but it really shouldn't have been a winner. But when I looked over, buddy-boy had already started getting ready for the next point: not a single step indicating he even thought about having a go.

If we'd been winning easily, I'd have understood. But we were actually losing at the time. How do you politely tell someone to stop being a lazy *ss?

Cindysphinx
08-06-2010, 06:24 AM
Ah, the Serial Quitter. I have had such partners. Won't run for things, won't stick a racket up. Everything is "Too Good."

The only thing that works for me is to try to run down such shots, even though partner is closer and it is obviously her ball.

The sight of my putting in an all-out effort can sometimes embarrass such players into realizing that if I thought the ball was playable, maybe they should treat it that way too. At most, I might go over to them panting and say a cheerful, "Man, you might have to get the next one!"

JRstriker12
08-06-2010, 06:43 AM
I would have asked - "Hey man, are you okay? You usually can track down those sort of shots."

Or - "let's try to hustle a bit more. We're giving up on these shots too easily."

Really, if they guy can't get his behind in gear, he shouldn't play, but you never know - maybe he was burned out, tired, etc. Could be a number of issues...

Mike2228
08-06-2010, 07:11 AM
that must have been extremely annoying

tennis tom
08-06-2010, 07:18 AM
That's what those 90 second change-overs are for. Sit down on the bench and ask him what's the matter, in a nice, partnerly way of course. If he doesn't want to talk about it, you're up ****-creek without a paddle.

Sounds like something's going on off the court distracting him. Maybe he had a bad-day at work or his wife just said she was leaving him--NO--that would probably make him jump for joy! Maybe he's on medical marijuana, a bit sluggish, with a touch of cosmic paranoia.

You can get quite a dialog going on those 90 second change-overs. Most "players" I encounter at 'ye ol' club, aren't even aware they have 90 seconds. They don't want to sit down--not macho to sit down--(they never do anything to get tired enough to have to sit down anyway). They'll stand around, fratranizing with the enemy, discuss the previous eve's fine dining experience, the Merlot or the Chardonnay, the weather in Tahoe or Tuscany, or fish for a hot-stock tip.

They talk too much during points and not enough on the bench during change-overs. What happened to bonding, kumbayah?

Fedace
08-06-2010, 07:29 AM
LOL,,, maybe he had an Injury that you didn't know about. I have a bad foot injury but normally i am pretty fast. Lately some of these misshit or good lobs, i have not been going for it if i determine that winning chance on that shot is less than 15 %.
but i don't always tell my partner about the injury cause it only tend to make my partner play worse, Not better.

spaceman_spiff
08-06-2010, 07:37 AM
Ah, the Serial Quitter. I have had such partners. Won't run for things, won't stick a racket up. Everything is "Too Good."

The only thing that works for me is to try to run down such shots, even though partner is closer and it is obviously her ball.

The sight of my putting in an all-out effort can sometimes embarrass such players into realizing that if I thought the ball was playable, maybe they should treat it that way too. At most, I might go over to them panting and say a cheerful, "Man, you might have to get the next one!"

Oh those DC people love to say "too good." I remember it well. They always thought my brother and I were really fast when I played there. It turns out we simply ran for things they would have given up on.

I thought the sight of me and the two opponents chasing everything down would have spurred him on a bit, but no. He only went for things he was absolutely certain he could reach.

120mphBodyServe
08-06-2010, 07:43 AM
You need to take a ZERO TOLERANCE stance with these idiots...
Or something like 3 strikes, then refuse to play with them...

BMC9670
08-06-2010, 08:06 AM
Sounds like he had $ on the other team.:shock:

Annika
08-06-2010, 09:04 AM
Serial Quitter! :) OK here's goes!!! That's why I like singles. :shock::shock: I get to choose whether the shot on my side is impossible to retrieve. Which is seldom. **maybe I shouldn't play doubles** :oops:

r2473
08-06-2010, 12:53 PM
You can get quite a dialog going on those 90 second change-overs. Most "players" I encounter at 'ye ol' club, aren't even aware they have 90 seconds. They don't want to sit down--not macho to sit down--(they never do anything to get tired enough to have to sit down anyway). They'll stand around, fratranizing with the enemy, discuss the previous eve's fine dining experience, the Merlot or the Chardonnay, the weather in Tahoe or Tuscany, or fish for a hot-stock tip.

OK, here you go:

The trick with stock is to roast the bones first to get some caramelized flavor going, then to slowly heat them in water until a bare simmer, and then let them cook that way, gently, for a good long time. With beef stock, it helps to include some beef scraps or stew meat, as well as aromatic vegetables and herbs. Also a few veal bones will help provide gelatin to the stock.

tennis tom
08-06-2010, 01:55 PM
OK, here you go:

The trick with stock is to roast the bones first to get some caramelized flavor going, then to slowly heat them in water until a bare simmer, and then let them cook that way, gently, for a good long time. With beef stock, it helps to include some beef scraps or stew meat, as well as aromatic vegetables and herbs. Also a few veal bones will help provide gelatin to the stock.

That sounds yummy, you're making my mouth water, I'll give the recipe to my chef. I wish I had a tip for you in return but I'm gloomy on the economy. My only winner is Ford. I like your signature BTW, how true

OrangePower
08-06-2010, 03:31 PM
Could be your partner was just being a lazy sh1t. Or maybe he had a hangover from the night before. Or a lingering unseen injury.

Actually, on the first example (the framed shot), it's very possible that he was completely wrong-footed. If you start off leaning the wrong way, then sometimes it's impossible to recover and make a play at the ball even if it looks to someone else like you could have got there in time.

Same thing can happen with a lob... if you are moving your weight forward and are caught off-guard by the lob, it's hard to recover even if it looks like you had time to run it down.

Or then again, maybe your partner was just being a lazy sh1t :-)

thejuice
08-06-2010, 10:08 PM
I heard the funniest thing the other day from a friend of mine that told me a lady he was paired with at a resort told him. She asked him a question that I will begin to ask when I feel like my partner just isn't hustling enough..."we are playing Penn 4 right? It seems like you got a good look at it. If it does say Penn 4 and you can see it then go ahead and try to hit it." I thought I'd break a rib laughing at that one!!! Try it and see if it works.