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View Full Version : When you've been hit, do you get angry or get even?


Angle Queen
08-07-2010, 05:11 PM
In a lackadaisical ladies practice last week (hot temps and w/o my regular partner) and got gobsmacked by a volley. Jammed my sunglasses into my visor and slammed 'em back down across the bridge of my nose. It's turned into one heckuva shiner.

Since I like to think I defend myself and my court position fairly well, it's rare for me to get hit. In this instance, we are all teammates and I know there was no ill-will intended.

But as I sit here with the ice pack still on my face trying to get the swelling down, I think of the few other times I've been hit and wondered how you other players handle those situations. Since this mostly happens in doubles, how do you and/or your partner react in those situations?

My own experiences are that if someone hits my ladies partner, I'm gonna put one close to our opponents at the next opportunity (usually because I'm usually the one at net)...and that's that. Never in/at the face...but close enough for them to get the idea. If I'm the one getting the close call, I just shrug it off...pride bruised a bit...and hope to get my racket on it better next time. Funny how I'm willing to avenge her...but not myself.

In mixed, the situation is quite different. If they hit my male partner...he generally will seek the revenge himself but only if it was the opposing man who did it. If it was the woman who did it, we'll laugh it off as a (un)lucky shot. But if I get hit (regardless which gender opponent did it)...my partner is all set to hit the guy (again, regardless of who actually "hit" me). I try to talk him out of it. Kind of a double-standard, I suppose, given how I try to take care of my ladies partner.

So what do ya'll think/do?

ThePro101
08-07-2010, 05:20 PM
Trying to hit someone is never good sportsmanship, even if it happens to be a winning tactic.

My position is to just keep playing... I've never encountered a situation where someone was intentionally trying to injure me or another player. If a hit occurs, it always seems to be quickly followed with an apology.

-- Fair Play--

wrxinsc
08-07-2010, 05:26 PM
seeing as how we are in the middle of mixed league this is a well timed question imo.

for me, even though one is "supposed" to hit at the presumably weaker female partner, i just don't play that way. if they are playing that way i make sure we become less predictable as a partnership, and i will become much more aggressive a partner looking for opportunities. in short at a recreational level there isn't much call for hitting the lady.

i don't much care one way or another if i am hit. it just happens sometimes in combos and spring league.

if my lady partner was to be hit intentionally somewhere other than at the feet (a 4.0 / 4.5 man can control where he hits the ball) that would be another story. at the earliest opportunity the offending guy would be hit squarely between the eyes. i pitched a little as a young man - that is what you do.

1stVolley
08-07-2010, 05:28 PM
I agree with the previous post. I often hit directly at a close-by player, but never to hurt them, only to elicit an error or weak return. And I've never had an opponent who got hit take it the wrong way. Also, if it's an especially hard shot, I immediately apologize.

With overheads, I never consciously aim directly at someone, though every once in awhile my aim is not so good and it gets pretty close. Again, I immediately apologize.

Likewise, when I've been hit, I never get mad as I've never suspected any malice.

mutantducky
08-07-2010, 05:41 PM
I hit you on purpose. felt good too. :twisted: come to the dark side young padawan.

mlktennis
08-07-2010, 06:50 PM
It's happened a couple of times where I have been hit. Usually accidentally... but sometime during the game I get them back. Never at the head but somehow, somewhere in my subconcious when hitting a sitter/lob, I get them and it's not a premeditated act.

Lakers4Life
08-07-2010, 07:34 PM
Duck next time.

120mphBodyServe
08-07-2010, 11:28 PM
Depends on the situation. If it's accidental I let it slide...
If it's a competitive match and I feel like it was intentional...
I get angry. And I get even. Well, at least I try to...

Cooper_Tecnifibre4
08-07-2010, 11:53 PM
i was playing a inter district tournament today, in doubles every time our opponents got somewhat of an easy shot they would crack one so hard at me or my opponent that it would either hit us in the face or just miss and hit back fence...... it got so bad that i was ready to jump the net and well....... yeh ;)

......smart *** cockey tennis player i HATE

dizzlmcwizzl
08-08-2010, 02:51 AM
I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who would attempt to poison and destroy my [Mixed Partner]. And you will know my name is [DizzlMcwizzl] when I lay my vengeance upon thee.

~Jules from pulp fiction

polski
08-08-2010, 03:22 AM
I have probably been hit hundreds of times while playing doubles. There was only one time where I felt it was intentional. In mixed, we were up big against a guy known as a bad sport. He slammed one that caught me right in the stomach. He said nothing, just stared at me. We finished the match as if it never happened & won pretty easily. Then I shook his partner's hand & walked to my car. I haven't played the guy since & probably won't.

kelawai
08-08-2010, 05:02 AM
If, afraid to get hit. Stay away from the net. Do not play with strong players who can blast some shots.

tennis tom
08-08-2010, 07:03 AM
In a lackadaisical ladies practice last week (hot temps and w/o my regular partner) and got gobsmacked by a volley. Jammed my sunglasses into my visor and slammed 'em back down across the bridge of my nose. It's turned into one heckuva shiner.




Sorry to hear about your "gobsmacking" and thanks for adding a new word to my vocabulary. I'll be listening to Andy Murray for it.

Dump the shades and the visor too! They just get in the way. In your case, they probably created more of an injury than if you hadn't been wearing them. There's only one or two pros, who are good enough to be seen on TV, who wear them. Even the "best" quality lens cause refraction, (the ball isn't where you think it is: the gold fish bowl effect).

I've been hit in the eye by a ball in a very similar situation as yours. Actually, I hit myself in the eye, when the ball ricocheted off my racket. It was the very first point of a "friendly" club match. Like you, I was a bit lackadaisical. Unfortunately my opponent wasn't and he tee'd off on the first return and hit right for me. Moral of the story: if your on a tennis court, or near one, keep your eye out (or in) for fast moving balls, coming your way, from from the warm-up to the handshake.

It was in the stone-age of my doubles career, when I did what the "pros" instructed me to do: smack the net with my racket and stand there screaming "yours" and "switch" 84 times a match. If I'd been positioned near the service line, where I stand today, I would have had plenty of time to react and hopefully hit a decent volley.

I dug some ice out of the cooler, put it in a towel and iced it for a few minutes while I wondered if they'd be calling me ol' one eye. I was able to continue playing, saw my eye doctor the next day--no serious damage.

It's only a fuzzy little ball. The shape of the eye-socket fortunately prevents the ball from penetrating too deeply. I've seen a lot of people get hit in the eye (and the ear) and thankfully have yet to observe anyone sustain serious damage.

Lose the glasses, wear 'em on the sidelines. If they did any good, every pro would be wearing them. Neither Fed or Nadal wears glasses or a hat.

blakesq
08-08-2010, 07:08 AM
If you don't want to get hit, don't come up to the net, period.

polski
08-08-2010, 09:46 AM
If you don't want to get hit, don't come up to the net, period.

Who are you, Happy Gilmore? No one wants to get hit.

I never aim for anyone, but I will hit a volley (not an overhead) at someone's feet if it is the only shot that will win a point for me. If the ball happens to hit my opponent, I always quickly apologize & make sure they are OK prior to continuing.

polski
08-08-2010, 09:51 AM
[QUOTE=tennis tom;4927020]I've seen a lot of people get hit in the eye (and the ear) and thankfully have yet to observe anyone sustain serious damage.[QUOTE]

I know a guy that hit an opponent in college in the throat with a line-drive 2HBH service return. The opponent began bleeding through his mouth and was rushed to the hospital. Guy told me that the opponent had to have a voice box installed.

Note: this is all heresay, but it is still a great reason not to aim at someone.

Angle Queen
08-08-2010, 09:56 AM
Thanks for all the comments, gang.

And yeah, Tom, that visor ain't going back on my head anytime soon. Funny thing is, I had literally just put in on during the previous changeover because the sun was really pounding down with nary a cloud in the sky. As we are getting ready for a midday showdown at Sectionals, I was trying to mimic playing in such conditions and what will and what won't work gear-wise. Right now, I'll lose both the visor and glasses because even setting the sunshades across the bridge of my nose hurts. :p

For what it's worth, I'm not afraid of getting hit...nor do I really get mad about it. Like polski, rarely have I even the hint that a "close call" is intentional (except when in obvious retaliation for something we've unintentionally done). I both offer and receive quick apologies when something has inadvertently come a bit too close.

The other part I've realized...is that I rarely see such a hot shot coming back at me...because my regular partner is quite good at not hanging me out to dry (either keeps it low and well away from the opponents or a good lob)...or warns me of it. Like I said, I wasn't with my regular...and so I'll just leave it at that. No hard feelings harbored anywhere on this one. :)

blakesq
08-08-2010, 02:09 PM
I don't like to to lose either, but I still play tennis (and still lose, but I also win some). But, I am not overly worried about getting hit, and thats why I will come to net. If someone is going to complain about getting hit, that someone should stay away from the net.


Who are you, Happy Gilmore? No one wants to get hit.

I never aim for anyone, but I will hit a volley (not an overhead) at someone's feet if it is the only shot that will win a point for me. If the ball happens to hit my opponent, I always quickly apologize & make sure they are OK prior to continuing.

Panic492
08-08-2010, 02:41 PM
It is a fair part of the game. However, I would be full of it if I said it did not bother me. I never hit women in mixed-will not do it. In mens doubles if I get hit twice in a match then game on.

Mike2228
08-08-2010, 02:50 PM
In my last last match I faced a kid I think was nut hunting, but I just ingored it and continued playing my game.

West Coast Ace
08-08-2010, 05:34 PM
If someone is going to complain about getting hit, that someone should stay away from the net.I'm with you. Feel bad for the OP - but she apparently overestimated her reflexes ("likes to think she defends her court position fairly well" ) and learned a tough lesson. If your partner hits a duck you gotta get down and turn - take the shot in your back.

jmverdugo
08-08-2010, 05:57 PM
If I get hit on the net I usually say: "good shot!". I do get angry but to myself, usually when you get hit is because you are on the wrong place or you are just not paying attention to the point.

pyrokid
08-08-2010, 06:20 PM
If I get hit on the net I usually say: "good shot!". I do get angry but to myself, usually when you get hit is because you are on the wrong place or you are just not paying attention to the point.

Same, they hit a shot that won them the point, you're kind of overthinking this if you get too mad. It was a good shot by them, as good as a winner.

I mean, in almost any other sport you do a lot worse things to other players for less of a reason.

When I play with my friends, we usually go at the other person on volleys and overheads if they're hittable. It's all in good sport. It's like a contest.

It gets even better when we just stand there and try to volley the overheads back.

What's a sport without at least a little punishment?

JeMar
08-08-2010, 06:28 PM
If I get a floater and a clear shot, I'll take it.

I won't TRY to create that shot or make dumb errors just to get even.

J_R_B
08-09-2010, 06:14 AM
If I get hit (intentional or not), I just move on. It's one shot out of hundreds, it's part of the game, and it's not worth dwelling on. In fact, I prefer if people hit sitters right at me. I have a hell of a lot better chance of getting a racquet up and blocking it back if it's right at me rather than a clean winner somewhere.

TnTBigman
08-09-2010, 06:39 AM
If I like the person or am indifferent about them, I shrug it off after they show some from of apology (saying sorry, raising their racquet etc). If I don't like the person, I'll be gracefull about the hit, but send some more winners and passers their way.

goran_ace
08-09-2010, 06:39 AM
Getting hit is part of the game. It happens. It doesn't exactly feel good, but chances of actually sustaining an injury are remote.

I have played mixed teams who have used 'etiquette' offensively in head games. Basically I could tee off on the male's serve all day. The female was all over the net. So basically anything I hit hard anywhere other than the server's side doubles alley (tougher to do on a return) was met with complaints about me trying to hit her and then my partner would get mad at me thinking they might retaliate and would ask me to just slice it cross court every time (and then wonders why we don't get the same amount of break opportunities).

I don't apologize for hitting a ball near anyone, male or female. I don't intentionally try to hit people; I aim for spots on the court. If they happen to be standing in the way, then they should either know how to put a racket on it, get out of the way, give up the niet position and start at the baseline -- or maybe they should think about maybe playing at a lower level.

spaceman_spiff
08-09-2010, 06:45 AM
Don't get mad at your opponent; get mad at your partner. If you've been smacked hard, 9 times out of 10 that means your partner is to blame for setting them up for the kill. So, if you're getting hit and are getting angry, have a go at your partner.

On the other hand, if your opponent is going for a smash and you've decided to face up to it (hoping to get a lucky block back), you can't really blame the opponent if you get hit. Even if they're not aiming for you, there's always a good chance the smash/high volley doesn't go where it's supposed to and ends up going right at you. It happens all the time by mistake, and sometimes on purpose. Unless you turn your back early, basically conceding the point, then you've accepted the risk.

(I played 6 sets of doubles yesterday: 2 hits on the leg, blocked back 3 shots at the body, and dodged 1 at the face because it was a mis-hit that went long. I faced up to all of them, so I had no anger towards my opponents or any need for revenge.)

J_R_B
08-09-2010, 06:54 AM
If I like the person or am indifferent about them, I shrug it off after they show some from of apology (saying sorry, raising their racquet etc). If I don't like the person, I'll be gracefull about the hit, but send some more winners and passers their way.

You need to get hit in order to be motivated to hit winners? Strange...

goran_ace
08-09-2010, 07:01 AM
If I get hit (intentional or not), I just move on. It's one shot out of hundreds, it's part of the game, and it's not worth dwelling on. In fact, I prefer if people hit sitters right at me. I have a hell of a lot better chance of getting a racquet up and blocking it back if it's right at me rather than a clean winner somewhere.

Agree 100%. I welcome retaliation. Sign of a mentally weak opponent.

Grover Sparkman
08-09-2010, 07:06 AM
I've only been hit in a match once, and the guy apologized immediately. As long as it's obvious there's no malice behind it, I understand those things happen, and it's cool.

I was doing some drills once with the captain of my team, his wife and a few others. His wife was on the other side of the net, and someone hit a lob. I went for the smash which I can normally hit perfectly well. Except this time. It wopped her right between the eyes. I apologized profusely and felt horrible about it, of course. And fortunately, everyone realized that accidents like that happen. We laughed about it, but at the time it was one of the worst feelings you can have when playing tennis.

Luckily enough, it missed her nose and just hit her forehead, so no broken/bloody/swolen nose or anything. Just a small bruise that went away in a couple days.

goober
08-09-2010, 07:44 AM
In mixed, the situation is quite different. If they hit my male partner...he generally will seek the revenge himself but only if it was the opposing man who did it. If it was the woman who did it, we'll laugh it off as a (un)lucky shot. But if I get hit (regardless which gender opponent did it)...my partner is all set to hit the guy (again, regardless of who actually "hit" me). I try to talk him out of it. Kind of a double-standard, I suppose, given how I try to take care of my ladies partner.

So what do ya'll think/do?

Your mixed partner should not play for revenge in a tennis match. It is unsportsmanlike conduct IMO to deliberately try to hit and possiblly injure somebody to get even. 90 % of the time the reason you got hit is because your partner did not make a good shot that set you up to be hit. In reality he should be mad at himself.

If your partner made a tough shot and they still volleyed or hit a difficult overhead smash that hit you- well hats off to the other team. There is no way most recreational players could deliberately hit you off that kind of shot. I would stop playing with a person who deliberately tried to hit people as a revenge tactic.

Angle Queen
08-09-2010, 09:12 AM
I'm with you. Feel bad for the OP - but she apparently overestimated her reflexes ("likes to think she defends her court position fairly well" ) and learned a tough lesson. If your partner hits a duck you gotta get down and turn - take the shot in your back.Yep. Complete overestimation on my part. And, today in practice, I took a step back from my usual position and actually got to a few balls that normally would have been behind me. Lesson(s of several kinds) learned. :)

And, for what it's worth, I'm not complaining that it happened. It's definitely part of stepping on the court. It was just the impetus for the question.

Don't get mad at your opponent; get mad at your partner. If you've been smacked hard, 9 times out of 10 that means your partner is to blame for setting them up for the kill. So, if you're getting hit and are getting angry, have a go at your partner.Yep, here too. Realized that. Wasn't with my regular partner (who I probably would've had a quick quip for :p ) and didn't want to cause any waves and, so, said nothing to her.

Your mixed partner should not play for revenge in a tennis match.True enough. But reality is somewhat different. He's usually not able to do anything about right away...and the lust for it wears off quickly.

I would stop playing with a person who deliberately tried to hit people as a revenge tactic.It's a fairly common trait with most of the guys around here. And by "hitting at" -- I'm talking about a shot essentially at their feet. I would never, ever want to hurt someone...and you're right, I wouldn't play with anyone who would.

RogerRacket111
08-09-2010, 09:35 AM
I don't anyone hits intentionally. If you give a floater expect the hit it hard and show your backs and get out of the way. If its a really fast shot then I don't think they have that much control to intentionally hit you.

If you look at it from the other side when you try to be really nice sometimes by trying to place it might actually come back for a winner. Or you might end up hitting the net.

darthpwner
08-09-2010, 09:37 AM
If you have enough firepower, get even. If you don't have the firepower like McEnroe, just lie down and scowl. "Vell, nobody ask him to come to net."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xAPwx3z950
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLRx2TACIKA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pykN4jiaYdY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-8lPjgW2YY

Ronaldo
08-09-2010, 09:44 AM
When you get hit, you know you are in the game. With so many playing close to close shots, someone will get tagged. But at higher levels, that ball may come rightbackatchu.

Tarboro
08-09-2010, 10:09 AM
The only time I've ever gotten angry about being hit was when I conceded a point on a sitter when both opponents were at net. I turned my back and took a step toward the alley. The less "agreeable" opponent, who's always hard to get along with, hit me in the lower back with the overhead, then offered a pretty weak apology ("Woops, that one got away from me").

FloridaAG
08-09-2010, 10:16 AM
Part of the game - deal with hit -

dizzlmcwizzl
08-09-2010, 10:25 AM
I play with a group of men that play at a local public tennis complex. The courts are nearly always full and there are always people hanging around having beers and socializing. In this environment often times we go out of our way to tag our opponents, below the wasit usually. We are all friends and we have all been the hitter and the hittee many times. When it happens there is always loud hollering and a little taunting .... followed by a faint wave or meaningless apology. Within this group no worries.

However, when playing mixed if the man targets my female partner innopropriately I will return fire back at him ... never at her. I find it is generally easier to poach off the woman's return and the best shot is usually to aim at the net man's forehand hip.

gameboy
08-09-2010, 10:41 AM
If I get hit, it is my own damn fault for not blocking it.

I have gotten hit plenty of times (even in the groins, I rolled around for good 10 min). Never even thought to retaliate.

If you are not fast enough to block the ball coming to you (or at least turn around), then move back. Otherwise, shake it off and play. We are not talking about getting hit by a baseball or something.

goober
08-09-2010, 11:25 AM
to do anything about right away...and the lust for it wears off quickly.

It's a fairly common trait with most of the guys around here. And by "hitting at" -- I'm talking about a shot essentially at their feet. I would never, ever want to hurt someone...and you're right, I wouldn't play with anyone who would.

Hitting at someone's feet is not revenge IMO. That is normal hitting and play. I would say that is fair play at any time.

I guess I am glad I don't play competitive mixed doubles. It seems that many guys have the mentality- "women are weak, protect the women. I must avenge any slight against my female partner"

I only play social mixed and most people try to go out of their way to play nice so I never run into any situations like you seem to.

RogerRacket111
08-09-2010, 11:54 AM
Here is a extreme case of what not to do

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMr_RzCGWOw

darthpwner
08-09-2010, 11:54 AM
Yep. Complete overestimation on my part. And, today in practice, I took a step back from my usual position and actually got to a few balls that normally would have been behind me. Lesson(s of several kinds) learned. :)

And, for what it's worth, I'm not complaining that it happened. It's definitely part of stepping on the court. It was just the impetus for the question.

Yep, here too. Realized that. Wasn't with my regular partner (who I probably would've had a quick quip for :p ) and didn't want to cause any waves and, so, said nothing to her.

True enough. But reality is somewhat different. He's usually not able to do anything about right away...and the lust for it wears off quickly.

It's a fairly common trait with most of the guys around here. And by "hitting at" -- I'm talking about a shot essentially at their feet. I would never, ever want to hurt someone...and you're right, I wouldn't play with anyone who would.

Hitting at someone's feet is the smartest play. If I get anything about chest or shoulder height, it's an easy put away. Picking up balls at my shoe laces is much more difficult.

cll30
08-09-2010, 07:50 PM
I just say, "Nice shot" and get ready for the next point.

Topaz
08-09-2010, 08:18 PM
I got hit on my left breast tonight....ouchie!!!

slewisoh
08-09-2010, 08:24 PM
I confess that I get ****ed when I feel an opponent is repeatedly going at the head, whether by accident or on purpose. At such times I have had a heightened ability to place the ball just out of their reach.

However, there was one opponent who nailed me in the neck, and then high-fived her partner who yelled, "NICE FINISH!" They were accustomed to me hitting at their feet or around them, so were quite surprised when the shots started coming in to their sternums.

No wings or halo for me...

spaceman_spiff
08-10-2010, 12:42 AM
I got hit on my left breast tonight....ouchie!!!

And then you went to your tennis match. ;)


To be fair, I've had several close calls lately with shots coming dangerously close to the sensitive area.

blakesq
08-10-2010, 06:29 AM
in a men's 4.0 doubles match, I returned a serve hard right into the net guy's frank and beans. It was terrible to watch, because he immediately said "Oh no" upon being hit, because he know the pain is delayed in those types of hits, and then he turned pale, and went down to his knees. I felt bad, and apologized, but I think it was a fair shot.

goober
08-10-2010, 07:42 AM
in a men's 4.0 doubles match, I returned a serve hard right into the net guy's frank and beans. It was terrible to watch, because he immediately said "Oh no" upon being hit, because he know the pain is delayed in those types of hits, and then he turned pale, and went down to his knees. I felt bad, and apologized, but I think it was a fair shot.

If you are at the baseline and you hit someone at the net that is totally on them for not being able to handle it. Honestly that shouldn't happen in a 4.0 level doubles match unless they guy was completely not paying attention for some reason. On a return of serve situation the netman is completely set and ready- expecting a ball hit at him. If he can't handle that situation, he shouldn't be at the net.

blakesq
08-10-2010, 09:10 AM
I only have to disagree with a portion of your response. It can and does happen in 4.0 tennis, because at 4.0 (and higher) a person can simply make a mistake, misjudge the ball, get his timing screwed up, anticipate wrongly, whatever. Mistakes happen.

If you are at the baseline and you hit someone at the net that is totally on them for not being able to handle it. Honestly that shouldn't happen in a 4.0 level doubles match unless they guy was completely not paying attention for some reason. On a return of serve situation the netman is completely set and ready- expecting a ball hit at him. If he can't handle that situation, he shouldn't be at the net.

RogerRacket111
08-10-2010, 09:27 AM
If you are at the baseline and you hit someone at the net that is totally on them for not being able to handle it. Honestly that shouldn't happen in a 4.0 level doubles match unless they guy was completely not paying attention for some reason. On a return of serve situation the netman is completely set and ready- expecting a ball hit at him. If he can't handle that situation, he shouldn't be at the net.

If you hit hard enough it can happen to anyone. When you smack a hard return on a weak serve you have to be super fast to react to a 100mph return half court.

goober
08-10-2010, 10:56 AM
I only have to disagree with a portion of your response. It can and does happen in 4.0 tennis, because at 4.0 (and higher) a person can simply make a mistake, misjudge the ball, get his timing screwed up, anticipate wrongly, whatever. Mistakes happen.

I don't disagree with anything you are saying. Once you get to a certain level of tennis, if you are at the net with your knees bent, racquet in front of you and the opposite player is on the baseline- you shouldn't take a clean shot in the nads. Obviously it can happen, and fluke shots do occur. If it happens that you keep getting hit at the net, well you may have to rethink whether you should be up there or not until you improve your net skills. That's all...

Totai
08-10-2010, 11:17 AM
If I get hit, I get ****ed off at myself for not being able to get the racquet to the right place to protect myself/return the ball. I do not retaliate because it is useless

destroyer
08-10-2010, 02:58 PM
Getting hit is part of the game.
I do not let it become a distraction.

gmatheis
08-10-2010, 04:56 PM
More often i find people trying not to hit me and I tell them not to be afraid to rip it at me ... If i get hit it's my own fault.

LuckyR
08-11-2010, 11:16 AM
There are two completely different things: 1) aiming at a persons body (whether you hit them or not) and 2) aiming towards a person, usually the netman to win the point. Sometimes in #2, the netman gets hit. This it totally acceptable tennis in my way of thinking. #1 is totally unacceptable, whether or not the player gets hit with the ball.

So at the end of the day, the difference between good, aggressive play and an a55hole is their mental attitude, not whether a player gets hit or not.

gameboy
08-11-2010, 01:44 PM
How do you tell them apart?

RogerRacket111
08-11-2010, 02:18 PM
How do you tell them apart?

I think they use a scope :)

FLA10s
08-11-2010, 07:57 PM
My last league match i got hit in the face twice and after the second time i smashed the racquet into the ground about 100 times, nobody said anything to me after that so i think they were scared for their lives or something.:twisted:

Im working on my anger though....

film1
08-11-2010, 08:11 PM
I often go near peoples feet with some fairly hard pace but
I never want to hit anyone. If I get hit I do not pout about it ot take it personally.
Doubles is a fast paced game.

LuckyR
08-12-2010, 09:48 AM
How do you tell them apart?

Only through circumstancial evidence, like a smirk or a prior reputation etc. Imperfect, but unless you are a mindreader, that's all you've got.

gameboy
08-12-2010, 10:19 AM
Then, why do you even bother when you could be very wrong?

LuckyR
08-12-2010, 06:38 PM
Then, why do you even bother when you could be very wrong?

Oh, I don't worry about it as I almost never get hit. If someone hits someone intentionally, they are the loser, not the person who got hit. 5 minutes later the guy who got hit will forget about it, the other guy is a jerk forever...

Cindysphinx
08-15-2010, 10:28 AM
I can't remember the last time I got hit. "Hit" as defined as being hit above the waist, not counting the arms. I remember getting hit lightly on the nose once by a 3.0 woman in a 3.0 ladies match maybe 4 years ago, but whose fault is that?

I think some of you guys need to learn to duck. Me, I duck a lot. There are a lot of people -- male and female -- who try to hit hard and flat, and if you can just duck their ball will go long.

As for mixed . . . I wish I played on the planet where men don't hit at women. In the *very first* point in my *very first* 7.5 mixed combo match, the opposing guy hit straight at me. I missed the shot, but I didn't get hit.

Cindy -- whose current 7.5 mixed combo partner rips the ball past the opposing lady all the time and who loves him for it

Blade0324
08-16-2010, 06:00 AM
I get hit pretty often when playing dubs. I find that is just part of the game. Also it's not unusual for me to hit someone else. I do go at people feet quite a bit with volleys. Also if I have an oponent that is very aggressive at the net I will start hitting most returns right at their stomach. I find it very effective.

coloskier
08-16-2010, 06:06 AM
If you aren't getting hit when playing doubles, you aren't a very good or aggressive doubles player. If you aren't moving forward, you aren't a good doubles player, and sometimes when you move forward you get hit, it's all part of the game.

slewisoh
08-16-2010, 08:23 AM
As for mixed . . . I wish I played on the planet where men don't hit at women. In the *very first* point in my *very first* 7.5 mixed combo match, the opposing guy hit straight at me. I missed the shot, but I didn't get hit.

Cindy -- whose current 7.5 mixed combo partner rips the ball past the opposing lady all the time and who loves him for it

This doesn't sound like you...are we hearing from Cindy's evil twin? :)

The best advice I ever received with regard to playing mixed came from a male partner. He told me to stop trying to poach, fake etc. and to simply be still, with racquet up and weight forward.

As he pointed out, the 4.0 guy is aiming for me, so if I am balanced and waiting for the shot I have a better chance of angling off a solid volley.

Cindysphinx
08-16-2010, 08:49 AM
If you aren't getting hit when playing doubles, you aren't a very good or aggressive doubles player. If you aren't moving forward, you aren't a good doubles player, and sometimes when you move forward you get hit, it's all part of the game.

Sorry, I don't agree. I mean, if we are talking about volleys and groundies above the waist, why can't you either get a racket on such shots or get out of the way?

I think if you are getting hit a lot, it could be for many reasons. But the couple of ladies I know who have shown me their bruises on arms and legs from getting hit are *terrible* volleyers.

Cindysphinx
08-16-2010, 08:56 AM
This doesn't sound like you...are we hearing from Cindy's evil twin? :)

The best advice I ever received with regard to playing mixed came from a male partner. He told me to stop trying to poach, fake etc. and to simply be still, with racquet up and weight forward.

As he pointed out, the 4.0 guy is aiming for me, so if I am balanced and waiting for the shot I have a better chance of angling off a solid volley.

Exactly. The 4.0 guy *is* (or should be) aiming to score points off of the opposing woman if she is the weaker player on the court.

Besides, if my 4.0 partner is stronger than I am (as is definitely the case in 7.5 mixed combo), then we want the opponents to have to play to him as much as possible. My taking chances at the net will result in us either losing points we could have won or, if I do a really good job, winning points my partner could have won for us anyway. So I play the net much more conservatively in mixed than in ladies. And when I am deep, I run into the net like my hair is on fire at the first opportunity.

Funny story. I have a couple of 3.5 lady friends. Both are very strong and will undoubtedly be bumped to 4.0. I told them I was mulling whether to play 8.0 mixed, and they said they had played 8.0 mixed with 4.5 male partners.

Both ladies hated hated hated it. One told me that her 4.5 male partner introduced himself and said essentially, "All right. You stand right here, near the net and the alley. Don't hit a ball unless you would have to duck otherwise. I'll take everything else." She said it took her the whole season to convince him to let her stand in the correct spot when he served or received. The other had a similar experience, and both said they had enjoyed playing with 4.0 guys more than 4.5 guys.

OK, where was I going with this story?

Oh, yeah. Right. A woman playing mixed with a significantly stronger guy does get the speech about just being ready and not doing anything fancy. So I probably won't play 8.0 mixed, 'cause where's the fun in that?

coloskier
08-16-2010, 11:49 AM
Sorry, I don't agree. I mean, if we are talking about volleys and groundies above the waist, why can't you either get a racket on such shots or get out of the way?

I think if you are getting hit a lot, it could be for many reasons. But the couple of ladies I know who have shown me their bruises on arms and legs from getting hit are *terrible* volleyers.

If your opponent hits a good volley, you shouldn't have time to get out of the way.

tennislefty
08-16-2010, 11:54 AM
hint. i know alot of 4.5 guys...havent met a 4.5 guy who likes 8.0..its true we cant really play..ego's!
BUT,..it makes you a much better player because the ratio of received balls a 3.5 player gets with the 4.5 partner is on average 8:1. :)

deluxe
08-16-2010, 02:07 PM
what do you guys think about an overhead, hit by the guy very hard, but hit downwards into the court, but which hits the lady in the head on the way back up? (lady standing at the service line)

Cindysphinx
08-16-2010, 02:09 PM
what do you guys think about an overhead, hit by the guy very hard, but hit downwards into the court, but which hits the lady in the head on the way back up?

I think "Accidents happen."

Just apologize and move on. A lift of the racket is sufficient.

sureshs
08-16-2010, 02:13 PM
My partner hit the opposing lady in the breast yesterday while tossing the third ball over to her before her partner served. She wasn't expecting it and was looking elsewhere.

Later, I hit the opposing guy in the balls while tossing the third ball to him when he wasn't looking!

Cindysphinx
08-16-2010, 02:20 PM
If your opponent hits a good volley, you shouldn't have time to get out of the way.

I guess I took issue with the idea that getting hit means you are a good, aggressive player. Which would mean that not getting hit means you are not a good, aggressive net player.

Some folks don't get hit because (1) they have fast hands, and (2) they know to watch the net player, so they know when the bullet volley is coming.

I can think of one friend I play with. I have hit her many, many times. Usually in the legs, sometimes in the arms, sometimes in the body. Not in the head (yet). Her problem is that she turns her head and watches her partner, and she often watches the deep player instead of watching me. She would be the opposite of a good, aggressive net player, I'd say. In contrast, she has never hit me once (although there have been some close calls when she cracks her FH from the baseline right at me).

FloridaAG
08-16-2010, 02:34 PM
There is a massive disconnect in this thread - there is a massive difference between getting hit by the opposing net player or getting hit by someone from the baseline - I think people are talking about different things.

No matter how fast your hands or reflexes are, if you don't get hit by an opposing net player occasionally then that is bizarre - it happens -

Cindysphinx
08-16-2010, 04:43 PM
There's also a disconnect on what it means to get "hit." I get hit in the legs all the time. Pretty much whenever someone aims at my feet and I don't reflex it back.

cghipp
08-16-2010, 08:34 PM
If I get hit, I almost always feel it's because I was in the wrong place. I didn't react quickly enough, or I didn't pay close enough attention to realize the person at net was getting a short ball. The only time I get angry is if someone was deliberately going at my head.

On the reverse side, I really hate it if I hit someone - especially if I hurt them. I'm a pretty hard hitter and I enjoy "swinging away," but I put the pressure on myself to not hit someone if I have an easy overhead. Sometimes it's unavoidable (like when someone runs into the ball), but I want to/need to have enough control to avoid it when possible.

I recently hit someone at a charity fundraising clinic - now that was horrible. We were working on volleys and I got a high one and attacked it - and hit a very nice woman very hard in the sternum. Worse, I didn't realize at first that she was hurt - it knocked the wind out of her, so I was not immediately appropriately apologetic. I felt like an ***. It really put a damper on the the clinic, and NO ONE (especially me) wanted to hit a high ball for a while after that. I had just come back from my team's state tournament finals the day before and was very tired, and I'd LIKE to think that was why I hit her, and it wasn't just complete idiocy on my part...

I don't believe in karma, but if I did that would be a nice explanation for why every nagging tennis injury I'd ever had seemed to show up the next morning and stick around for weeks!

cghipp
08-16-2010, 08:41 PM
Also: I don't get hit all that often, but there is one lady in my area who is always hitting me! Luckily she is also usually on my team, ha ha. She's an excellent player. It's not that she goes after me, but that our relative court position, coupled with her preferred volley angles, don't work out to a good matchup for me when she gets a ball at net! I seem to always be at a 45-degree angle from her, and she usually volleys at that angle on one side or another. I know I need to adjust, but the fact is that she's an aggressive net player and I have terrible near vision. I have a hard time holding my ground at net, and if I drift back I am in her line of fire. I tease her about it, but she's a good sport - and competitive enough not to be too worried about it!

slewisoh
08-16-2010, 08:47 PM
The best advice I ever received with regard to playing mixed came from a male partner. He told me to stop trying to poach, fake etc. and to simply be still, with racquet up and weight forward.



I must clarify that this is only on the return of serve, when my partner is serving to the opposing man. For the rest of the point, I'm nearly as active as when I play women's doubles - including handling my own overheads.

I've only played 8.0 a few times and it wasn't much fun for anyone. And I'm hardly a delicate flower...

Kaz00
08-16-2010, 08:55 PM
well ive been taught there are 3 options when someone is at the net for singles.. lob, angle pass, or just beam it at them good ol Lendl.

but if i get hit during doubles i usually seek revenge if its against people i dont know, with friends we usually just laugh it off.

olliess
08-16-2010, 09:38 PM
if i get hit during doubles i usually seek revenge if its against people i dont know, with friends we usually just laugh it off.

True friends are the ones you can aim at. :twisted:

Ronaldo
08-17-2010, 11:45 AM
what do you guys think about an overhead, hit by the guy very hard, but hit downwards into the court, but which hits the lady in the head on the way back up? (lady standing at the service line)

That's a good start. Rather bounce the ball low at the up man, a lil breeze between the knees.

LuckyR
08-17-2010, 12:31 PM
I guess I took issue with the idea that getting hit means you are a good, aggressive player. Which would mean that not getting hit means you are not a good, aggressive net player.

Some folks don't get hit because (1) they have fast hands, and (2) they know to watch the net player, so they know when the bullet volley is coming.

I can think of one friend I play with. I have hit her many, many times. Usually in the legs, sometimes in the arms, sometimes in the body. Not in the head (yet). Her problem is that she turns her head and watches her partner, and she often watches the deep player instead of watching me. She would be the opposite of a good, aggressive net player, I'd say. In contrast, she has never hit me once (although there have been some close calls when she cracks her FH from the baseline right at me).


Completely accurate. The other response was an opinion unencumbered by data.

PinkTennisNinja
08-24-2010, 07:06 AM
Here's my thoughts. I'm a 3.0 girl who plays like a 3.5. I'm young so I hit hard and have somewhat decent reactions. If I've never played with you before (women's doubles) I test the waters a little. Slam one at the body of the net man (girl) but only when I know she is paying attention. I never aim for the head. I do this a few times because I normally play on the deuce side and I have a one handed backhand and my most FAV shot is a return down the alley beside the net man. They don't normally see it coming haha. I've started off playing with just guys so I've been hit plenty since they were trying to be funny lol. And the one time I can actually remember that I was hit by a girl I was at the net and even saw the ball coming and it was like I had a brain fart and stood there. It hit me directly in the forehead! It was sooo funny! All I could do was laugh. The girl felt bad (I think) but it didn't hurt (or leave a mark, thank god!) so I told her not to worry about it. If I'm not quick enough to hold the racquet up or move then I shouldn't stand there or so close. In mixed, however, most of the time the guys that I have played think "this girl isn't going to hit at me".......WRONG! If your a guy playing against me that gives me free reign to hit you :) I probably won't hit at the girl but to show the guy that I'm not just a target I nail a few at him (normally at the feet). I know most of these guys and they don't mind hehehe. And I don't mind if they nail a few at me either. This is good practice for ladies doubles. Ladies don't hit as hard so I'll be confident and aggresive at the net come fall combo :twisted: Now this isn't for everyone though. This is normally for people that are pretty evenly ranked with me. We have quite a few older (50 yr and up) people that play. I play pretty "nice" with them since most of them are just out to have fun and play. It really just depends on the person(s) :)

Fedace
08-24-2010, 07:09 AM
In a lackadaisical ladies practice last week (hot temps and w/o my regular partner) and got gobsmacked by a volley. Jammed my sunglasses into my visor and slammed 'em back down across the bridge of my nose. It's turned into one heckuva shiner.

Since I like to think I defend myself and my court position fairly well, it's rare for me to get hit. In this instance, we are all teammates and I know there was no ill-will intended.

But as I sit here with the ice pack still on my face trying to get the swelling down, I think of the few other times I've been hit and wondered how you other players handle those situations. Since this mostly happens in doubles, how do you and/or your partner react in those situations?

My own experiences are that if someone hits my ladies partner, I'm gonna put one close to our opponents at the next opportunity (usually because I'm usually the one at net)...and that's that. Never in/at the face...but close enough for them to get the idea. If I'm the one getting the close call, I just shrug it off...pride bruised a bit...and hope to get my racket on it better next time. Funny how I'm willing to avenge her...but not myself.

In mixed, the situation is quite different. If they hit my male partner...he generally will seek the revenge himself but only if it was the opposing man who did it. If it was the woman who did it, we'll laugh it off as a (un)lucky shot. But if I get hit (regardless which gender opponent did it)...my partner is all set to hit the guy (again, regardless of who actually "hit" me). I try to talk him out of it. Kind of a double-standard, I suppose, given how I try to take care of my ladies partner.

So what do ya'll think/do?

would you try to put one in the vagijay ??

dizzlmcwizzl
02-13-2011, 04:40 PM
Had to bump this up since it came up today.

Playing 7.0 mixed. We are a 4.0 / 3.0 combination playing against a 3.5 man and wife combo. I expect my partner to take the brunt of the easy shots the opponents will make. They should, if they can, put the ball towards my partner because I was clearly the best player on the court and she the weakest. What I object to is when the guy gets a sitter with a clean choice of shots to win the point, but instead the guy chooses to blast the ball at my partner at close range.

Twice this happened today. Both times he wound up and drilled a ball right at her both times hitting the ball into the net but the intent was there. After the second one we broke them to take a lead in the first set and then took a water break. During the water break I told the wife queitly that she should not worry about retaliation because I would not be aiming at her. She thanked me at the time because she was not aware that I would be aiming at him.

During the next 3 games a total of 9 shots were hit by me .... hard at him. Three poach volleys, two serve returns down the line from point blank range, two overheads and two groundstrokes on sitters. I did not hit him once but not for lack of trying. By the end of the third game of my onslaught the wife asked me what I wanted to happen .... I simply said no more cheap shots at my partner.

She went back and talked to her husband and turned around and said "no problem". We had a clean match after that which we won at 4 and 4.

Cindysphinx
02-13-2011, 07:28 PM
Again, we live on different planets, apparently.

I have been playing 8.0 mixed, sometimes with a solid 4.5 partner, sometimes with 4.0 partners. I get utterly hammered at net. *Hammered,* I tell ya. Every finishing volley goes to me. Every overhead goes to me. If my partner comes to net, the passing shot comes to me.

At first, I was not doing well with this. I almost got hit in the face twice. If I did make the volley, it was a sitter. And I was coughing up cheap errors when the guy would aim groundies at me.

I've found the solution, though. Last summer, I took a lesson on volleying, and the pro told me to get as low as possible while at net. The idea was that being low turns a low volley into a head-high volley (if your are crouched such that your head is at net height, all volleys are head-high volleys, right?). It also allows you to uncoil into the ball and use your legs more.

So I have this new ready position at the net: Crouched low, heels up, weight on toes. I am getting more weight on my volleys, and I am not dumping any into the net.

None of this would be necessary if I played on the planet where men don't target the woman at net . . . .

beernutz
02-13-2011, 07:28 PM
I got hit on my left breast tonight....ouchie!!!
Pics or it didn't happen. :)

Ronaldo
02-13-2011, 07:36 PM
Used to be amusing until a friend received a cracked rib from being targeted.

OrangePower
02-13-2011, 08:02 PM
I certainly don't advocate hitting directly at someone with the intent to hurt them.

But having said that, it is the responsibility of each player to be able to protect themselves - meaning, if you're going to be up at the net, you need to have good enough hands to handle the kind of pace your opponents can generate, and you need to be savvy enough to change your position (i.e. back off) if your partner hits a weak shot to the opponents.

If you can't do this and you are being hit, then perhaps you are attempting to play at an inappropriately high level.

Ronaldo
02-13-2011, 08:07 PM
I certainly don't advocate hitting directly at someone with the intent to hurt them.

But having said that, it is the responsibility of each player to be able to protect themselves - meaning, if you're going to be up at the net, you need to have good enough hands to handle the kind of pace your opponents can generate, and you need to be savvy enough to change your position (i.e. back off) if your partner hits a weak shot to the opponents.

If you can't do this and you are being hit, then perhaps you are attempting to play at an inappropriately high level.

We don't see this guy at the net now till the match is over.

Hewex
02-13-2011, 09:12 PM
A men's drill I used to go to had a lot of this. Guys were getting hit with overheads all the time and the guy getting the feed in a reflex volley drill would hit a swinging volley as hard as he could...Of course, as soon as somone got hit, it got worse. I quit going because I only have so much tennis time, and I wasn't getting much out of that situation.

dizzlmcwizzl
02-14-2011, 02:49 AM
None of this would be necessary if I played on the planet where men don't target the woman at net . . . .

To be fair, I expect my partner to recieve most of the attention from the other team. Why would you hit it to me and likely lose the point rather than hit it to my partner and likely win the point.

What I do not like is when you are trying to intimidate my partner. He did this by overswinging on on short balls inside the service box and taking them down the line while she is standing at the net. In no case was this the best shot to win, but rather a blatant attempt to hit it hard at my partner.

"you wanna play, i'll play with you and I play hard too"~Quote heard on the radio

Ronaldo
02-14-2011, 03:14 AM
A men's drill I used to go to had a lot of this. Guys were getting hit with overheads all the time and the guy getting the feed in a reflex volley drill would hit a swinging volley as hard as he could...Of course, as soon as somone got hit, it got worse. I quit going because I only have so much tennis time, and I wasn't getting much out of that situation.

Develop quick reflexes or die trying early morning drill session.

Cindysphinx
02-14-2011, 03:33 AM
To be fair, I expect my partner to recieve most of the attention from the other team. Why would you hit it to me and likely lose the point rather than hit it to my partner and likely win the point.

What I do not like is when you are trying to intimidate my partner. He did this by overswinging on on short balls inside the service box and taking them down the line while she is standing at the net. In no case was this the best shot to win, but rather a blatant attempt to hit it hard at my partner.

"you wanna play, i'll play with you and I play hard too"~Quote heard on the radio

Who was serving up all that high soft cheese in the first place?

dizzlmcwizzl
02-14-2011, 03:46 AM
Who was serving up all that high soft cheese in the first place?

One was a reflex volley I hit while in the ad side alley. The entire middle of the court was open because I had moved wide to get the ball, but he went at her down the line instead of the open court.

The other happened when he guessed correctly on a second serve and ran around his backhand to take it as a forehand, taking it down the line. This one could have been excusable in my oppinion if he had not already drawn my ire.

Cindysphinx
02-14-2011, 04:20 AM
What level is she? (I assume you're the 4.0 and she's the 3.0.)

smucker007
02-14-2011, 04:21 AM
When I play doubles..If i get hit, its my fault. Its my fault I didn't get my racquet up, its my fault I wasn't ready for the volley, its my fault I didn't run away! Usually if my weight is forward and I'm ready for the volley I rarely get hit. If I'm already backing away..I don't have the split step or able to react to the ball..but still able to play dodgeball!

I was taught to hit volleys at the feet of my opponents. Sometimes I don't get a clean shot and it gets away from me, and if I do hit someone..I profusely apologize, because it was not intended.

Maui19
02-14-2011, 04:33 AM
I'm glad this got bumped up because it is something I've been wondering about lately. While I haven't hit anyone, I have been hitting the ball between the legs of the opposing net man with alarming frequency. When I'm at the net (or at least no deeper than the service line) and the opponents are one up one back, the only place to go with a floating volley or overhead is near the up guy. I go at the feet of the net man, but I'm not that good, and sooner or later I'm going to get the body. I don't want to drill someone, and every time I come close I apologize and no one seems bothered by it. I also don't want to hit that shot to the open court either, because the back guy has a MUCH greater likelihood of getting it back. So that's my quandry.

I won't hit at a women unless she has skilz--strong 4.0 or above. I just can't do that.

I haven't had anyone hit at me on purpose (that I am aware of). Getting hit it part of the deal, and if the hitter apologizes I am fine with it. I don't think I would be fine with it if someone hit me in the head and glared at me. I think there would be words. But generally, getting hit is part of the game. It's like baseball. You get hit by pitches regularly. But if someone is throwing chin music on purpose, that's a different story.

Tennis sensation
02-14-2011, 06:48 AM
Had to bump this up since it came up today.

Playing 7.0 mixed. We are a 4.0 / 3.0 combination playing against a 3.5 man and wife combo. I expect my partner to take the brunt of the easy shots the opponents will make. They should, if they can, put the ball towards my partner because I was clearly the best player on the court and she the weakest. What I object to is when the guy gets a sitter with a clean choice of shots to win the point, but instead the guy chooses to blast the ball at my partner at close range.

Twice this happened today. Both times he wound up and drilled a ball right at her both times hitting the ball into the net but the intent was there. After the second one we broke them to take a lead in the first set and then took a water break. During the water break I told the wife queitly that she should not worry about retaliation because I would not be aiming at her. She thanked me at the time because she was not aware that I would be aiming at him.

During the next 3 games a total of 9 shots were hit by me .... hard at him. Three poach volleys, two serve returns down the line from point blank range, two overheads and two groundstrokes on sitters. I did not hit him once but not for lack of trying. By the end of the third game of my onslaught the wife asked me what I wanted to happen .... I simply said no more cheap shots at my partner.

She went back and talked to her husband and turned around and said "no problem". We had a clean match after that which we won at 4 and 4.

That was evil.:twisted::twisted:

T1000
02-14-2011, 06:59 AM
If I get I'm mad at myself for either giving them an easy shot or messing up (out of position, slow reactions, etc.) I don't care that they hit me, part of the game. I do care though if the guy hits my partner in mixed, you just don't hit girls. Guy did this at the end of his service game and won the game off it by hitting my partner at point blank range, could've put the ball anywhere else. Next point I'm serving and he's at the net, he felt how hard I could serve.

goober
02-14-2011, 07:12 AM
The more I read this thread, the more I want to reconsider playing competitive mixed dubs for the first time for the next upcoming season. :shock:

gameboy
02-14-2011, 07:46 AM
Yup, pretty vindictive group of people we have around here...

maverick66
02-14-2011, 08:51 AM
Yup, pretty vindictive group of people we have around here...

That and tennis players are sensitive little girls.

If you get hit more than likely it was your fault or your partners fault. If you hit a floater to a net person and are just standing there you are gonna get pegged. Either get out of the way or get your racket up to protect your face.

GPB
02-14-2011, 08:58 AM
That and tennis players are sensitive little girls.

If you get hit more than likely it was your fault or your partners fault. If you hit a floater to a net person and are just standing there you are gonna get pegged. Either get out of the way or get your racket up to protect your face.

Exactly! I haven't been "taught" doubles tactics since high school, but it was drilled into our heads that if you hit somebody it's your point! Aim for the feet -- if you hit them, great; if you miss, they still have a tough volley to make.

We play a little game here called "thumper." Two people start about halfway up in the service box (across the net from one another) and start volleying. You get a point by hitting the opponent. It teaches you that if you put up a weak sitter, you'd better protect yourself! This game can be expanded to doubles, as well.

So I guess what I'm saying, in response to the OP, is that if you get hit in doubles, there are two people to blame: (1) yourself, and (2) your partner. If you can't handle the fire, get outta the kitchen and retreat to the baseline!

dizzlmcwizzl
02-14-2011, 10:27 AM
That and tennis players are sensitive little girls.

As opposed to talking tough behind the anonymity of the internet.

dizzlmcwizzl
02-14-2011, 10:31 AM
Exactly! I haven't been "taught" doubles tactics since high school, but it was drilled into our heads that if you hit somebody it's your point! Aim for the feet -- if you hit them, great; if you miss, they still have a tough volley to make.

I agree ... take every shot you can at the feet of your opponent. That is a smart play everytime regardless of gender.

However, that does not give you permission to go out of your way to hit a ball at the body of a defensless player. When you do this, I take that as permission to do the same.

dizzlmcwizzl
02-14-2011, 10:39 AM
The more I read this thread, the more I want to reconsider playing competitive mixed dubs for the first time for the next upcoming season. :shock:

I really enjoy it and personally I never target women when the correct play is to hit it elsewhere. And if the the correct play does go in her direction the ball will be near her feet.

Unfortunately, there are some players that will try and take advantage and unecessarily pick on the weaker player. Prefering instead to hit every ball to the weak player on the court regardless of court position. Fortunately these people often are weak players themselves, frequently lose and are attempting to conceal their own deficiencies. In these cases it is not fun but not every match is.

I have truthfully enjoyed mixed and in 9 out of 10 matches I have a great time. I enjoy it more than adult men's tennis on average.

sureshs
02-14-2011, 11:06 AM
In a lackadaisical ladies practice last week (hot temps and w/o my regular partner) and got gobsmacked by a volley. Jammed my sunglasses into my visor and slammed 'em back down across the bridge of my nose. It's turned into one heckuva shiner.

Since I like to think I defend myself and my court position fairly well, it's rare for me to get hit. In this instance, we are all teammates and I know there was no ill-will intended.

But as I sit here with the ice pack still on my face trying to get the swelling down, I think of the few other times I've been hit and wondered how you other players handle those situations. Since this mostly happens in doubles, how do you and/or your partner react in those situations?

My own experiences are that if someone hits my ladies partner, I'm gonna put one close to our opponents at the next opportunity (usually because I'm usually the one at net)...and that's that. Never in/at the face...but close enough for them to get the idea. If I'm the one getting the close call, I just shrug it off...pride bruised a bit...and hope to get my racket on it better next time. Funny how I'm willing to avenge her...but not myself.

In mixed, the situation is quite different. If they hit my male partner...he generally will seek the revenge himself but only if it was the opposing man who did it. If it was the woman who did it, we'll laugh it off as a (un)lucky shot. But if I get hit (regardless which gender opponent did it)...my partner is all set to hit the guy (again, regardless of who actually "hit" me). I try to talk him out of it. Kind of a double-standard, I suppose, given how I try to take care of my ladies partner.

So what do ya'll think/do?

Matador position

rosewall4ever
02-14-2011, 11:14 AM
its fair game..esp in mixed. in the AO mark woodbridge commented on attacking the female. obviously not intentionally to hurt her but to get the error. like hitting at the opponents feet during net exchanges, hitting wide to unbalance her, but also sometimes hit at the female so as to jam her.

generally its a fact that if you come to the net you are expected to defend your side. if you are not competent or find that the OP are stronger at net then stay back and make the OP defend their position.

if i get hit i shrug it off and say it was a good shot and knuckle down. trying to get revenge is bad sportsmanship

catfish
02-14-2011, 11:41 AM
This is an interesting topic. I think you have to look at each situation and make a judgement call. In general, I feel like you should always hit to the open court, and not try to hit people. If everyone is at the net in a doubles match, try to hit at the opponents feet. Often, a soft ball that lands at their feet will be harder for them to handle. But a hard shot into the body or at someone’s feet is certainly legit if everyone is close to the same level.

However, in situations where there is a big gap between the player’s levels, there is no reason to “hit at” the lower level person. I saw something this past weekend in a mixed match that I thought was ridiculous and totally uncalled for. It was an 8.0 mixed match. One team was a young 4.0 guy (30-ish)and a pretty athletic younger 4.0 women. They played against a 4.5 husband / 3.5 wife team. The 3.5 women is about 60 years old, very thin, not especially athletic, and it was obvious she could be overpowered. The 4.5 husband had been pulled out wide behind the baseline and had thrown up a short, defensive shot. So he was out of the picture pretty much. The 3.5 wife stood on her side of the court in the middle of the service box. The young 4.0 opponent man had the short ball and 80% of the court to hit into. All he had to do was hit a medium paced overhead in between the husband/wife. Well, he slammed an overhead right at the 3.5’s women at about head level. She had turned her back giving him the shot, and he hit her on the back of her neck or on top of her shoulder. Then he actually laughed! Give me a break. Was that really necessary? I wouldn’t do that and I’m a woman. How can a young guy feel good about hitting a 60 year old woman? The ball wasn’t even hit at her feet, it was almost head high. Where is common sense and good judgement?

dominikk1985
02-14-2011, 11:57 AM
If you have been hit by a baseball you don't mind beeing hit by a tennisbal anymore:D.

OrangePower
02-14-2011, 12:14 PM
This is part of the problem with mixed, and why I've never felt comfortable playing it competitively:

Playing 4.5 men's dubs, if I get a good look at a 2nd serve, I will sometimes try to rip it down the line right at the opposing net player. The intent is not to hit the guy - even if I hit it perfectly, 4.5 guys are good enough to make a play at the ball or at a minimum get out of the way of the ball. But there definitely is an intimidation factor - whether I win the point or not, I am letting the guy know that I am going to take shots down the line, that he has to watch the line and not get too comfortable with looking for the poach, and that he'd better back a few steps off the net on second serves. All this reduces his ability to be effective at the net.

Now imagine I am playing 8.0 mixed and the net player is a 3.5 woman. And let's say I play exactly the same shot down the line as I would in 4.5 mens, but the 3.5 woman is not quick enough to block the ball or duck, and is not savvy enough to be standing a few steps back from the net. And say I hit her. That was certainly not my intent, and I would feel bad. And if her partner was the OP he would be giving me 'the look'. But, why should I change my shot selection to accomodate my opponents' weaknesses? So it's a lose-lose proposition.

Topaz
02-14-2011, 12:18 PM
^^^why is it lose/lose? 3.5 women who play 8.0 have a darn good idea of what they are facing when they step on court. Play your shot.

maverick66
02-14-2011, 12:20 PM
As opposed to talking tough behind the anonymity of the internet.

Didnt see it as tough talk more an observation. But it proved my point seems it got your panties in a bunch.

However, that does not give you permission to go out of your way to hit a ball at the body of a defensless player. When you do this, I take that as permission to do the same.

Go ahead. There is no rule against hitting at the net player. I wouldnt mind it especially if you were missing in the process of your revenge peg. If you do that you are giving me free points because you are butt hurt over getting hit with a little yellow ball.:)

^^^why is it lose/lose? 3.5 women who play 8.0 have a darn good idea of what they are facing when they step on court. Play your shot.

I am all for fair treatment but given the choice of the guy or girl I will nail the guy first. Not to say I havnt hit a girl with a ball in mixed but she cried and it was sad. :(

GPB
02-14-2011, 12:26 PM
I have a sad story.

I'm playing a friendly doubles match, and the guy on the other side of the court is a relatively new player. I'm at the net and he's around the service line (maybe my partner was serving?). I get an easy volley and pop it (NOT blast it, just a solid pop) his way, around belly level.

He ducks and tries to get the racket on it with a squash-type shot. He misses. Ball hits him in the eye.

Talk about feeling bad for hitting somebody. Luckily, there's no permanent damage.

catfish
02-14-2011, 12:29 PM
This is part of the problem with mixed, and why I've never felt comfortable playing it competitively:

Playing 4.5 men's dubs, if I get a good look at a 2nd serve, I will sometimes try to rip it down the line right at the opposing net player. The intent is not to hit the guy - even if I hit it perfectly, 4.5 guys are good enough to make a play at the ball or at a minimum get out of the way of the ball. But there definitely is an intimidation factor - whether I win the point or not, I am letting the guy know that I am going to take shots down the line, that he has to watch the line and not get too comfortable with looking for the poach, and that he'd better back a few steps off the net on second serves. All this reduces his ability to be effective at the net.

Now imagine I am playing 8.0 mixed and the net player is a 3.5 woman. And let's say I play exactly the same shot down the line as I would in 4.5 mens, but the 3.5 woman is not quick enough to block the ball or duck, and is not savvy enough to be standing a few steps back from the net. And say I hit her. That was certainly not my intent, and I would feel bad. And if her partner was the OP he would be giving me 'the look'. But, why should I change my shot selection to accomodate my opponents' weaknesses? So it's a lose-lose proposition.

Why not hit a dipper at the net player (3.5 woman's) feet. She probably can't volley it if it has a huge amount of spin, and you win the point without hitting her.

I do understand that it is an adjustment for men to play mixed, especially with combined ratings. But the way I look at it, if you are a 4.5 you should have the control and shot variety to win points off lower level female players without hitting them or scaring them.

JoelDali
02-14-2011, 12:37 PM
8.0 Mixed is destroying the game.

It must be banned from all league play.

Stay away from Mixed 8.0.

That includes YOU.

http://www.toadhaven.com/images/barf1.jpg

DeShaun
02-14-2011, 01:23 PM
Get angry initially if they looked to have had other angles and the intention of hitting at me. Then maybe I forgo from my back court trying to pass them on a wing of theirs at net in favor of aiming a flat bullet towards their upper trunk, neck, or face...yeah, I will do this if you tagged me violently when many other angles were open to you than the one angle which led directly to my chest when we were facing one another across the net at a distance of three meters apart, yeah, I will tag you, if I have a good reason for suspecting that you did not try hard enough to avoid tagging me.

sureshs
02-14-2011, 01:39 PM
I have had people hit me and laugh (off a very weak shot from my partner). Better to have the last laugh by not getting hurt - i.e., adopt the matador position and show your side to the opponent. Or start backing off from the net at once with your racquet covering your face when you got some time. There is no point in getting hurt (I wear glasses), probably permanently, and then arguing about whether you should get even, what the etiquette is, etc. You are not Mike or Bob Bryan - you don't do this for money, so just protect yourself.

Topaz
02-14-2011, 02:14 PM
I think many of you are making this more complicated than it really is...play the ball, not the people. And don't be a deliberate jerk.

Cindysphinx
02-14-2011, 02:14 PM
^^^why is it lose/lose? 3.5 women who play 8.0 have a darn good idea of what they are facing when they step on court. Play your shot.

I understand what Catfish is saying -- we all have to use common sense.

But really. If you are a woman playing 8.0 mixed, you know exactly what you signed up for. The last time I looked at my 8.0 female teammates, all of them seemed to have both eyes intact and were not covered in bruises. So they appear not to be defenseless.

Fellas, take your shots, fer cryin' out loud. Use common sense. Don't aim your overheads at anyone's body or head, and don't celebrate if you do hit someone.

Honestly, I wonder if some of this reluctance to play normally in mixed has its roots in lack of skill or lack of confidence. In other words, if you aren't confident of your ability to hit your pass down the line and win the point against the woman, you can just say that you didn't take the shot because you "didn't want to hurt the li'l lady." The truth, however, could be that you lack the control to go for this shot.

Am I right?

Topaz
02-14-2011, 02:16 PM
Spot on Cindy!

sureshs
02-14-2011, 02:19 PM
I understand what Catfish is saying -- we all have to use common sense.

But really. If you are a woman playing 8.0 mixed, you know exactly what you signed up for. The last time I looked at my 8.0 female teammates, all of them seemed to have both eyes intact and were not covered in bruises. So they appear not to be defenseless.

Fellas, take your shots, fer cryin' out loud. Use common sense. Don't aim your overheads at anyone's body or head, and don't celebrate if you do hit someone.

Honestly, I wonder if some of this reluctance to play normally in mixed has its roots in lack of skill or lack of confidence. In other words, if you aren't confident of your ability to hit your pass down the line and win the point against the woman, you can just say that you didn't take the shot because you "didn't want to hurt the li'l lady." The truth, however, could be that you lack the control to go for this shot.

Am I right?

Yes.............

OrangePower
02-14-2011, 02:19 PM
^^^why is it lose/lose? 3.5 women who play 8.0 have a darn good idea of what they are facing when they step on court. Play your shot.

Because there will be some folks like perhaps the OP that will take offense if their 3.5 women partner is nailed in this way. And some 3.5 women who take to the court expecting the opposing man to hold back in such situations.

Not all, perhaps not even most, but some.

OrangePower
02-14-2011, 02:24 PM
Why not hit a dipper at the net player (3.5 woman's) feet. She probably can't volley it if it has a huge amount of spin, and you win the point without hitting her.

I do understand that it is an adjustment for men to play mixed, especially with combined ratings. But the way I look at it, if you are a 4.5 you should have the control and shot variety to win points off lower level female players without hitting them or scaring them.

Why should I have to adjust my game to suit my opponents' weaknesses?

When I hit directly at the opposing net player, the objective is not just to win the point. It's also to cause that player to step back from the net in future and to protect the line more. So it is a strategic play and not just a tactical play.

Again, I'm not trying to actually hit the opposing player, and my expectation is that they are skilled enough to avoid being hit. But unfortunately that is not always the case in mixed. (Not always, because many 3.5 women who are used to playing 8.0 mixed know what to expect and can handle it)

OrangePower
02-14-2011, 02:31 PM
I understand what Catfish is saying -- we all have to use common sense.

But really. If you are a woman playing 8.0 mixed, you know exactly what you signed up for. The last time I looked at my 8.0 female teammates, all of them seemed to have both eyes intact and were not covered in bruises. So they appear not to be defenseless.

Fellas, take your shots, fer cryin' out loud. Use common sense. Don't aim your overheads at anyone's body or head, and don't celebrate if you do hit someone.

Honestly, I wonder if some of this reluctance to play normally in mixed has its roots in lack of skill or lack of confidence. In other words, if you aren't confident of your ability to hit your pass down the line and win the point against the woman, you can just say that you didn't take the shot because you "didn't want to hurt the li'l lady." The truth, however, could be that you lack the control to go for this shot.

Am I right?

If all 3.5 ladies (and their partners) had the same attitude as you and Topaz, then there would be no issue.

Unfortunately, that is not the case in my experience.

And for example, the OP that started this thread took offense at the opposing male player hitting right at his female partner.

I do not play any different when I play 4.5 mens and (on the relatively few occasions) when I play 8.0 mixed. But I get some looks thrown my way in mixed that I don't get in mens (and it's not because of my rugged good looks).

kylebarendrick
02-14-2011, 03:24 PM
If you are playing a competetive match, then both players should expect to have balls hit in their direction. If they are trying to command the net, then they both need to be ready for hard shots to drive them away from the net.

I play a lot of mixed with my wife, and she'd be the first to agree with Cindy that most men aren't afraid to launch it her way and she always needs to be ready for it. No hard feelings are involved, it is part of the game.

You can generally tell when someone is hitting hard in the direction of the net player strategically versus maliciously. As someone said earlier in this thread, I'll just say "nice shot" and move on.

This may sound bad, but you may want to try hitting at your opponents during practices (everyone should agree on this first). I am used to my friends trying to hit me and know how to deal with it. If you get used to it in practice then it is one less thing that your match opponents can do to get under your skin.

gameboy
02-14-2011, 03:34 PM
Some of you need to do more drills where you are at the net and players are hitting passing shots as hard as they can (even serving from the baseline to a net player).

We do this all the time during our clinic and I have gotten hit countless times (even in the groin). Once you get hit a few times, you just learn to shake it off and keep playing. Getting hit is part of playing the game, in my opinion.

Cindysphinx
02-14-2011, 03:35 PM
If all 3.5 ladies (and their partners) had the same attitude as you and Topaz, then there would be no issue.

Unfortunately, that is not the case in my experience.

And for example, the OP that started this thread took offense at the opposing male player hitting right at his female partner.

I do not play any different when I play 4.5 mens and (on the relatively few occasions) when I play 8.0 mixed. But I get some looks thrown my way in mixed that I don't get in mens (and it's not because of my rugged good looks).

Women who believe they can volley or protect themselves (that is, play doubles) don't mind being hit at. They try to win the point, and they often do.

Women who can't volley well sometimes object. And by objecting, they get some men to change how they play so that their weakness at net is no longer a liability.

You guys who back off are being played, IMHO.

OrangePower
02-14-2011, 04:01 PM
Women who believe they can volley or protect themselves (that is, play doubles) don't mind being hit at. They try to win the point, and they often do.

Women who can't volley well sometimes object. And by objecting, they get some men to change how they play so that their weakness at net is no longer a liability.

You guys who back off are being played, IMHO.

I completely agree. And that's why I said it is sometimes lose-lose. Because of those women who can't volley well and sometimes object. As a guy, if you back off, you are being played. But if you don't back off, you are made to feel like a headhunter - which even if unfounded, does not make for a pleasant match.

By the way I don't mean to pick on the ladies. It's not a gender thing really, it's a skill differential thing. A 3.5 woman to a 4.5 man is about a three rating level difference. If you are going to have players on the same court with such a gap in levels, especially if some of them are not used to playing against much stronger players, you're going to have some moments.

dizzlmcwizzl
02-14-2011, 04:22 PM
My problem is not when they hit it near, around or towards my partner. Both my 7.0 and 8.0 partners enjoy being at the net and would prefer to be there rather than engaged at the baseline. Neither partner has ever complained, ever.

However I object when given a choice of hitting the ball in many places for a clean winner the opposing man took a shot at my partner from point blank range ... he hit the ball flat and as hard as any ball of the evening.
Given this set of circumstances my plan of attack was to be a more agressive player, hit the ball hard and in a place where the opponent would have difficulty playing an agressive return at my partner ..... right at him.

Now it seems to me that biggest objection I have heard stems from the fact that I did it on purpose and told them I was going to do so ... then proceeded to do exactly what I said I would. Would it have been different if I had just turned up the agression, hit the exact same shots and was not open about my intentions.

Or perhaps it would have been better to take the same approach and decide the best place to hit the ball was hard in a location his female could not play it ... right at her. Which incidently he was doing, and I do not need to do in order to win.

Or better still should I have let this attempt to itimidate my partner go unchecked give him a "good shot" and try to win by turning to lobs, drop shots and sharp angled winners.

These shots are not my strength ... power is my strength and when pressed I will hit it hard, and given the choice of attacking the woman or the man I will choose the right shot first and the man second before purposely target the woman.

catfish
02-14-2011, 04:25 PM
Why should I have to adjust my game to suit my opponents' weaknesses?

When I hit directly at the opposing net player, the objective is not just to win the point. It's also to cause that player to step back from the net in future and to protect the line more. So it is a strategic play and not just a tactical play.

Again, I'm not trying to actually hit the opposing player, and my expectation is that they are skilled enough to avoid being hit. But unfortunately that is not always the case in mixed. (Not always, because many 3.5 women who are used to playing 8.0 mixed know what to expect and can handle it)

Most of the time you don't need to adjust how you play. I'm just saying that sometimes, if you are playing a 60 year old 3.5 woman, why not adjust a little and win with controlled spin rather than scaring the woman? The guy I saw hit a 60 year old 3.5 woman in the neck / shoulder area. That's ridiculous and not using common sense.


I completely agree. And that's why I said it is sometimes lose-lose. Because of those women who can't volley well and sometimes object. As a guy, if you back off, you are being played. But if you don't back off, you are made to feel like a headhunter - which even if unfounded, does not make for a pleasant match.

By the way I don't mean to pick on the ladies. It's not a gender thing really, it's a skill differential thing. A 3.5 woman to a 4.5 man is about a three rating level difference. If you are going to have players on the same court with such a gap in levels, especially if some of them are not used to playing against much stronger players, you're going to have some moments.

I play mostly 9.0 and some 10.0 mixed. I'd rather be at the net than the baseline. I not trying to brag, but I volley better than some of the 4.5 men that I play 9.0 with. So it's not a gender thing. In 9.0 and 10.0 there usually isn't anyone on the court that's going to bat an eye at anything thrown at them. But in 8.0 mixed, I think that the 4.0 and 4.5 men shouldn't hit overheads at a 3.5 woman's body when they have open court to hit into. If they don't have open court, then hit at the woman's feet. I've found when you play a 4.5 man and a 3.5 woman, it can be very effective to hit behind the man since he is often trying to cover extra court toward the woman.

forehandshanker
02-14-2011, 04:26 PM
Exactly! I haven't been "taught" doubles tactics since high school, but it was drilled into our heads that if you hit somebody it's your point! Aim for the feet -- if you hit them, great; if you miss, they still have a tough volley to make.

We play a little game here called "thumper." Two people start about halfway up in the service box (across the net from one another) and start volleying. You get a point by hitting the opponent. It teaches you that if you put up a weak sitter, you'd better protect yourself! This game can be expanded to doubles, as well.

So I guess what I'm saying, in response to the OP, is that if you get hit in doubles, there are two people to blame: (1) yourself, and (2) your partner. If you can't handle the fire, get outta the kitchen and retreat to the baseline!

I agree. It's part of the game that if you're at net (be it singles or doubles), it's a valid tactic to drill hard passing shot right at the net player (though a low dipping pass is much better). You're not intentionally trying to hurt the net player. You're testing their reflex volleys.

The old school guy in me thinks that if you do peg the player, you ought to raise your racquet in apology just as you would if you won a point off a shank or a net cord. This keeps the match from becoming a head hunting contest.

Hewex
02-14-2011, 04:29 PM
I've been hit a lot. If you play doubles or do drills it is bound to happen. I've also won points where the person had an open court and chose to hit it at me. Somehow the racquet got on the ball and it ended up on his side of the net. When that happens, I enjoy those points as much as any. If I have a chance to hit it at someone or into an open court, it is a no brainer. I've set the point up to create an open court. I don't play points to create a chance to hit it at someone.

Cindysphinx
02-14-2011, 05:04 PM
I play mostly 9.0 and some 10.0 mixed. I'd rather be at the net than the baseline. I not trying to brag, but I volley better than some of the 4.5 men that I play 9.0 with. So it's not a gender thing. In 9.0 and 10.0 there usually isn't anyone on the court that's going to bat an eye at anything thrown at them. But in 8.0 mixed, I think that the 4.0 and 4.5 men shouldn't hit overheads at a 3.5 woman's body when they have open court to hit into. If they don't have open court, then hit at the woman's feet. I've found when you play a 4.5 man and a 3.5 woman, it can be very effective to hit behind the man since he is often trying to cover extra court toward the woman.

Nobody should be hitting overheads at the bodies of other players in rec tennis. No argument there.

Is it objectionable for a guy to take a sitter at the service line and blast it toward my feet or body? Honestly? No. I mean, gee whiz. I have *eyes.* I can see my opponent coiling up to rip his shot. If I feel I am too close or otherwise not equipped to deal, I will bail.

What often happens in that particular situation is that the guy tries to hit a hard flat shot from the service line and nets it or blasts it way long. I am very good at ducking and then asking my partner, "Did that land in?"

fruitytennis1
02-14-2011, 06:07 PM
Hs tennis anything goes.
I was in a lose situation at 1 dubs. After having 3 overheads hit me within the first 3 games i did not hesistate to serve a first serve (AT) the guy doing this nonsense.

ilikephobo
02-14-2011, 06:25 PM
only when its by my doubles partner.

NLBwell
02-14-2011, 06:36 PM
Since most of the time I hit someone it is my doubles partner I sure hope that he doesn't turn around and whack a ball at me every time I do it.

olliess
02-15-2011, 10:02 AM
So what do you all think if the male player hogs the net and gets one blasted at him?

equinox
02-15-2011, 10:04 AM
So what do you all think if the male player hogs the net and gets one blasted at him?

i think he's being forced to play mixed with a weak partner against two guys..

dizzlmcwizzl
02-15-2011, 02:39 PM
So what do you all think if the male player hogs the net and gets one blasted at him?

If by hog the net you mean play the middle, poach a lot and be overly agressive then how could this be considered the same thing? By the very definition an overly agressive player will do his best not to be where you think he will be, so how could you aim at him.

If you hit someone by accident there is no harm no foul. If someone poaches into your crosscourt drive and catches one ... it is on him (or her)

Angle Queen
02-15-2011, 04:05 PM
If all 3.5 ladies (and their partners) had the same attitude as you and Topaz, then there would be no issue.

Unfortunately, that is not the case in my experience.

And for example, the OP that started this thread took offense at the opposing male player hitting right at his female partner.

I do not play any different when I play 4.5 mens and (on the relatively few occasions) when I play 8.0 mixed. But I get some looks thrown my way in mixed that I don't get in mens (and it's not because of my rugged good looks).Sorry, Orange. Perhaps things have been lost in the time lapse. I was hit during ladies doubles play...and not complaining about getting hit in either single-gendered play...or mixed. I was merely asking about reactions to getting hit...in general.

I tend to play "up"...I play ladies...I play mixed (both 7.0 and 8.0). Have been hit in all the aforementioned. NONE bother me. I generally think...it's MY fault (regardless) of what kind of shot my partner has hit. I've been playing long enough...to know better, no matter what's been sent across the net.

Kind of interested, and slightly pleased, that this thread has been bumped.

The situation happened just today: a sitter...to me...in ladies. Against a (much weaker, IMHO) net/opponent. Did I get hit earlier in the match? Kind of...but it was a bounce-up that caught me...although I got a racket on it and it was no big deal. Did I hit it at her? Absolutely NOT. But at her feet? Absolutely!

Glad everyone is at least thinking about it. This is a "thinking" person's game, after all!

OrangePower
02-15-2011, 06:28 PM
Sorry, Orange. Perhaps things have been lost in the time lapse. I was hit during ladies doubles play...and not complaining about getting hit in either single-gendered play...or mixed. I was merely asking about reactions to getting hit...in general.

I tend to play "up"...I play ladies...I play mixed (both 7.0 and 8.0). Have been hit in all the aforementioned. NONE bother me. I generally think...it's MY fault (regardless) of what kind of shot my partner has hit. I've been playing long enough...to know better, no matter what's been sent across the net.
Kind of interested, and slightly pleased, that this thread has been bumped.

The situation happened just today: a sitter...to me...in ladies. Against a (much weaker, IMHO) net/opponent. Did I get hit earlier in the match? Kind of...but it was a bounce-up that caught me...although I got a racket on it and it was no big deal. Did I hit it at her? Absolutely NOT. But at her feet? Absolutely!

Glad everyone is at least thinking about it. This is a "thinking" person's game, after all!

My apologies... When I said OP I was thinking the person who revived this thread for the last go-round, not the original OP :-)

I completely agree with the bolded part, and if everyone had the same outlook then... well, we wouldn't need threads like this!

Topaz
02-15-2011, 06:31 PM
We had mixed practice tonight. One of the 3.5 gals got hit. She did not cry, throw a fit, glare, or demand retribution. She laughed and kept on playing.

True story!!!

equinox
02-16-2011, 04:06 AM
imho 98% of the time a player is at the net they're fair game for pegging.

return of serves, short groundie, stray kicker = peg.

high volley, smash = peg.

hitting in anger or outside of a point = low act. no peg.

being pegged is normal when playing aggressive doubles.

if don't get pegged once during a match then you're not taking your chances.

to people who don't agree.. i say use your racquet, change your positioning, remember it's a bloody tennis ball not a bullet.

Cindysphinx
02-16-2011, 04:28 AM
We had mixed practice tonight. One of the 3.5 gals got hit. She did not cry, throw a fit, glare, or demand retribution. She laughed and kept on playing.

True story!!!

My 4.5 mixed partner hit the opposing 3.5 woman with an overhead smash last night.

It's not as bad as it sounds. One of them hit a high lob to us, and my partner took it from no-man's land. The woman had backpedaled from the net to the baseline, although I personally think she should have backed up a bit more (she was in no-man's land). Partner blasted the ball, and opposing male popped up another defensive lob. Partner smashed this ball also, from behind service line. It went directly toward her body, and her attempt to block it missed. So it nailed her in the torso after the bounce.

He apologized, she said no problem. Her partner didn't retaliate or change how he played.

Instead, after the match he gave me a 30-minute lesson on my FH. It really helped, too. I can't wait to try out this new and improved FH next time I play!!

dizzlmcwizzl
02-16-2011, 07:24 AM
My apologies... When I said OP I was thinking the person who revived this thread for the last go-round, not the original.

I was the OB (original bumpee) to whom I think your comments were adressed.

I want to be clear about one thing ... I know that people will get hit all the time. I have hit and been hit without any anger or retaliation. I agree with anyone that says if you or your partner get hit then that is part of tennis and deal with it or get off the court.

However, my problem has been and will continue to be when a player chooses to avoid a better shot in an attempt to take a cheap shot at my partner.

The original bump happened when given a slate of other choices to win the point the opponent chose instead to hit the hardest shot he hit all night directly at my partner from close range ... all while I was pulled off the court and the middle of the court was wide open. He then did something similiar very soon thereafter. Now I told them what I thought and then did the same thing to him. I offer no apologies given the circumstances.

Totai
02-16-2011, 07:42 AM
My partner hit the opposing lady in the breast yesterday while tossing the third ball over to her before her partner served. She wasn't expecting it and was looking elsewhere.

Later, I hit the opposing guy in the balls while tossing the third ball to him when he wasn't looking!

Haha! too good. beware of the lethal sureshs 3rd ball

Totai
02-16-2011, 08:01 AM
This is part of the problem with mixed, and why I've never felt comfortable playing it competitively:

Playing 4.5 men's dubs, if I get a good look at a 2nd serve, I will sometimes try to rip it down the line right at the opposing net player. The intent is not to hit the guy - even if I hit it perfectly, 4.5 guys are good enough to make a play at the ball or at a minimum get out of the way of the ball. But there definitely is an intimidation factor - whether I win the point or not, I am letting the guy know that I am going to take shots down the line, that he has to watch the line and not get too comfortable with looking for the poach, and that he'd better back a few steps off the net on second serves. All this reduces his ability to be effective at the net.

Now imagine I am playing 8.0 mixed and the net player is a 3.5 woman. And let's say I play exactly the same shot down the line as I would in 4.5 mens, but the 3.5 woman is not quick enough to block the ball or duck, and is not savvy enough to be standing a few steps back from the net. And say I hit her. That was certainly not my intent, and I would feel bad. And if her partner was the OP he would be giving me 'the look'. But, why should I change my shot selection to accomodate my opponents' weaknesses? So it's a lose-lose proposition.

Thats your problem right there, you got compassion. tsk tsk tsk. you have to be evil to play tennis like some of the people on here.

equinox
02-16-2011, 08:25 AM
I was the OB (original bumpee) to whom I think your comments were adressed.

I want to be clear about one thing ... I know that people will get hit all the time. I have hit and been hit without any anger or retaliation. I agree with anyone that says if you or your partner get hit then that is part of tennis and deal with it or get off the court.

However, my problem has been and will continue to be when a player chooses to avoid a better shot in an attempt to take a cheap shot at my partner.

The original bump happened when given a slate of other choices to win the point the opponent chose instead to hit the hardest shot he hit all night directly at my partner from close range ... all while I was pulled off the court and the middle of the court was wide open. He then did something similiar very soon thereafter. Now I told them what I thought and then did the same thing to him. I offer no apologies given the circumstances.

in competition, winning points within the rules is all that matters. he continued following a winning strategy targeting your partner. holding a grudge over a peg showed poor composure.

most clever players in mixed target the weaker female player.

if i haven't caused tears "female" or an aggro "male" response from a pegging my night hasn't been a success, win or lose.

sometimes the only way to win is to drop your opposition to the deck at the first opportunity with apologies.

to be the hittee or hitter, that is the question.

of course this is all within the rules.

equinox
02-16-2011, 08:31 AM
Thats your problem right there, you got compassion. tsk tsk tsk. you have to be evil to play tennis like some of the people on here.

that's correct there can be zero hesitation or compassionate thoughts when smashing.

you go after the shot and if your opposition is incapacitated as a result, that is from there own unfortunate court positioning.

though most of the blame probably lies with there partners setup. :shock:

catfish
02-16-2011, 08:34 AM
I was the OB (original bumpee) to whom I think your comments were adressed.

I want to be clear about one thing ... I know that people will get hit all the time. I have hit and been hit without any anger or retaliation. I agree with anyone that says if you or your partner get hit then that is part of tennis and deal with it or get off the court.

However, my problem has been and will continue to be when a player chooses to avoid a better shot in an attempt to take a cheap shot at my partner.

The original bump happened when given a slate of other choices to win the point the opponent chose instead to hit the hardest shot he hit all night directly at my partner from close range ... all while I was pulled off the court and the middle of the court was wide open. He then did something similiar very soon thereafter. Now I told them what I thought and then did the same thing to him. I offer no apologies given the circumstances.

Ditto. I also posted here and I have the same opinion. I have been hit, and people are going to be hit playing tennis. It's generally not intentional, and most of the time we have a good laugh. But I have a problem with players who have the whole court open and choose to drill the opponent. I saw a really bad example of that last weekend in a mixed match. A young 4.0 man hitting a 60 year old 3.5 woman in the back of the neck when he had the whole court open. And then he laughed. What a jerk.

equinox
02-16-2011, 08:44 AM
But I have a problem with players who have the whole court open and choose to drill the opponent. I saw a really bad example of that last weekend in a mixed match. A young 4.0 man hitting a 60 year old 3.5 woman in the back of the neck when he had the whole court open. And then he laughed. What a jerk.

did you consider him a jerk for the peg or lack of compassion shown?

i see the the peg as simply another legal tactic at smart players disposal.

dizzlmcwizzl
02-16-2011, 09:50 AM
in competition, winning points within the rules is all that matters. he continued following a winning strategy targeting your partner. holding a grudge over a peg showed poor composure.

For what it is worth it was not a winning strategy for them.

Second so it seems you suggest that hitting at the opponent is fair game at any time. So why is it in bad form to do it after it has been done to you or your partner?

Perhaps it is only a problem if you do it with malice in your heart after being provoked instead of attacking the player at any time out of opportunity.

OrangePower
02-16-2011, 12:10 PM
For what it is worth it was not a winning strategy for them.

Second so it seems you suggest that hitting at the opponent is fair game at any time. So why is it in bad form to do it after it has been done to you or your partner?

Perhaps it is only a problem if you do it with malice in your heart after being provoked instead of attacking the player at any time out of opportunity.

I actually do agree with you that trying to hit the opponent for the sole purpose of trying to hit them is not cool.

Problem is that this is subjective - what I might view as my regular tactic of returning hard down the line to keep the net player honest you might (incorrectly) view as a deliberate attempt to hit your female partner at the net.

In general I think it makes for an awkward match when there is a large difference between the abilities of the players on the court. I would love to see (1) a rating system that is gender neutral (so that for example a 4.0 regarless of gender is competitive with another 4.0 regardless of gender), and then (2) a rule for combo and mixed that requires partners to be within .5 of each other. But that's all another topic...

catfish
02-16-2011, 12:15 PM
did you consider him a jerk for the peg or lack of compassion shown?

i see the the peg as simply another legal tactic at smart players disposal.

I don't think it's too smart to aim at a person rather than at a huge open court right in front of you. Looking at it from a tactical standpoint, hitting a controlled shot into the open court for a winner makes a lot more sense than slamming an overhead at a woman standing in the alley while her partner is way off the court on the other side.

I don't see too many people aim maliciously at opponents, but I guess if someone decides to do that he or she should be prepared for retaliation. Several years ago, I did see one of those intentional hit / retaliation situations in a mens 4.0 match. One of the players was a small-ish guy with a hot dog attitude. He tagged the opponents a couple of times and then turned his back rather than holding up a racquet in apology. He probably was the best player of the 4 on the court, and it was obvious he had a very high opinion of himself. His opponents were 2 regular guys in their late 40’s. One was a big guy that was not much of a tennis player, but he was muscular, a good athlete and he was pretty well known in the 4.0 tennis world for having a huge overhead. So the match is going along, and the small-ish guy and his partner are winning. In the 2nd set, the big guy ran down a drop shot, barely got to it, puffed it up for an easy sitter and then slipped on the clay and fell. So he’s on the ground, has his back to the net and is kind of in a crouched position with one leg under him trying to get back up. His partner is just standing on the baseline watching and doesn’t move. The small-ish annoying guy has an easy sitter he can hit into the open court with no trouble at all. He had 90% of the court open since the big guy and his partner were on the same side of the court. But instead of hitting to the open court, he chose to slam the overhead at the big guy on the ground. He intentionally hit the guy in the back, and then turned his back and stalked back to the baseline without saying a word. His partner looked at him and said “I can’t believe you did that” or something like that. The big guy that fell down and was intentionally hit didn’t really say anything. His partner and the small guy’s partner asked if he was OK, and he said yeah I’m fine. He didn’t seem particularly annoyed but boy, did he retaliate when he got a chance. He got a short lob and all 4 players were at the net. He laid into that overhead right at the small-ish guy who had hit him earlier. It was the hardest overhead I think I’ve ever seen. The ball hit the small guy in the thigh, and the small guy yelped and went down. The big guy held up his racquet and said “Sorry man.” The small guy just laid there for a few minutes holding his leg. There was a huge red welt on his leg. (It started turning purple before the match was over.) He had a look of total disbelief on his face. The big guy’s partner asked if he should call an ambulance because it sounded like a bone broke. I wasn’t sure if he was serious or trying to add comic relief. The small guy and his partner had been winning the match, but they ended up losing. The small guy just crumpled after the retaliation. His partner seemed like he wanted to be anywhere but there. So the big guy and his partner won in a 3rd set TB. The small guy packed his bag and left right after the match. His partner hung around and had a beer.

theyhatethecans
02-16-2011, 01:07 PM
I don't think it's too smart to aim at a person rather than at a huge open court right in front of you. Looking at it from a tactical standpoint, hitting a controlled shot into the open court for a winner makes a lot more sense than slamming an overhead at a woman standing in the alley while her partner is way off the court on the other side.

I don't see too many people aim maliciously at opponents, but I guess if someone decides to do that he or she should be prepared for retaliation. Several years ago, I did see one of those intentional hit / retaliation situations in a mens 4.0 match. One of the players was a small-ish guy with a hot dog attitude. He tagged the opponents a couple of times and then turned his back rather than holding up a racquet in apology. He probably was the best player of the 4 on the court, and it was obvious he had a very high opinion of himself. His opponents were 2 regular guys in their late 40’s. One was a big guy that was not much of a tennis player, but he was muscular, a good athlete and he was pretty well known in the 4.0 tennis world for having a huge overhead. So the match is going along, and the small-ish guy and his partner are winning. In the 2nd set, the big guy ran down a drop shot, barely got to it, puffed it up for an easy sitter and then slipped on the clay and fell. So he’s on the ground, has his back to the net and is kind of in a crouched position with one leg under him trying to get back up. His partner is just standing on the baseline watching and doesn’t move. The small-ish annoying guy has an easy sitter he can hit into the open court with no trouble at all. He had 90% of the court open since the big guy and his partner were on the same side of the court. But instead of hitting to the open court, he chose to slam the overhead at the big guy on the ground. He intentionally hit the guy in the back, and then turned his back and stalked back to the baseline without saying a word. His partner looked at him and said “I can’t believe you did that” or something like that. The big guy that fell down and was intentionally hit didn’t really say anything. His partner and the small guy’s partner asked if he was OK, and he said yeah I’m fine. He didn’t seem particularly annoyed but boy, did he retaliate when he got a chance. He got a short lob and all 4 players were at the net. He laid into that overhead right at the small-ish guy who had hit him earlier. It was the hardest overhead I think I’ve ever seen. The ball hit the small guy in the thigh, and the small guy yelped and went down. The big guy held up his racquet and said “Sorry man.” The small guy just laid there for a few minutes holding his leg. There was a huge red welt on his leg. (It started turning purple before the match was over.) He had a look of total disbelief on his face. The big guy’s partner asked if he should call an ambulance because it sounded like a bone broke. I wasn’t sure if he was serious or trying to add comic relief. The small guy and his partner had been winning the match, but they ended up losing. The small guy just crumpled after the retaliation. His partner seemed like he wanted to be anywhere but there. So the big guy and his partner won in a 3rd set TB. The small guy packed his bag and left right after the match. His partner hung around and had a beer.

good story. I've been back in tennis for a year and a half now and have played plenty of mixed, and didn't really think about this subject until last week in a mixed doubles match. Both the man and woman were very nice but they played very close to the net. I always try to hit by a close net person to get them off the net, and somebody on the opposing team started a discussion on the sideline that I was trying to hit the female net player. I told the guy that if somebody is going to be so aggressive at the net, they need to watch out for tennis balls. I usually play with a weaker partner in this league, so I know to play a little further back to give me some time to make a volley. If i was on top of the net, I'd have my head on a swivel. I would never hit anybody intentionally, but I have hit 2 women so far this year and felt terrible about it. Takes the fun out of the game for me when I feel guilt.

olliess
02-16-2011, 02:27 PM
If by hog the net you mean play the middle, poach a lot and be overly agressive then how could this be considered the same thing?
I mean the (usually male) players who crowd the middle as a sort of pressure tactic. Sometimes it also means they make it their job to actively hog the ball (away from their "weaker" partners). Do you see it as bad tactics and/or rude to drill 'em one if it's easier than trying to thread a short sitter around them to the open court?

(For the record I'm with the posters who think it's a legitimate part of tennis to "test" the net player's volleys if they're going to put themselves in that position -- it's completely different from actively trying to hit opposing players, even for some sort of "justified" retaliation).

dlk
02-16-2011, 02:37 PM
I mean the (usually male) players who crowd the middle as a sort of pressure tactic. Sometimes it also means they make it their job to actively hog the ball (away from their "weaker" partners). Is it seen as bad tactics and/or rude to drill 'em one if it's easier than trying to thread a short sitter around them to the open court?

I have done this & deserve what I get. I never get angry with getting pounded. It's my own bad reaction (okay sometimes in mixed, a partner will provide a golden egg) if I'm out of position or can't react in time. I like to say I can aim a sitter effectively I don't try to hit anyone.
The closest I 've came to hitting a female was when we were on the same side of the court & on my return of serve, I aimed down the line cause she had been sneaking/creeping the middle, but stayed at home on my shot to keep her honest. She hit as good as me, so I didn't feel too bad & she was cool about the close call. Won the point, but lost the match.

fruitytennis1
02-16-2011, 04:37 PM
in competition, winning points within the rules is all that matters. he continued following a winning strategy targeting your partner. holding a grudge over a peg showed poor composure.

most clever players in mixed target the weaker female player.

if i haven't caused tears "female" or an aggro "male" response from a pegging my night hasn't been a success, win or lose.

sometimes the only way to win is to drop your opposition to the deck at the first opportunity with apologies.

to be the hittee or hitter, that is the question.

of course this is all within the rules.


I'd be willing to bet your not a very "nice" person
Also im guessing you suck at tennis

Ronaldo
02-16-2011, 06:38 PM
If I do not get hit then I am not playing aggressive dubs. Mix it up and grow a pair. Saw a guy take an overhead at the net tonite, sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet chin music.

Kaz00
02-16-2011, 07:17 PM
Depends if its with my group of friends I get them back because we are just joking around. But during tourneys and its intentional that gets me furious and the next serve return and overhead the person at the net better be ready.

Ronaldo
02-16-2011, 07:28 PM
Depends if its with my group of friends I get them back because we are just joking around. But during tourneys and its intentional that gets me furious and the next serve return and overhead the person at the net better be ready.

Why get furious when you get hit daily?

maverick66
02-16-2011, 07:51 PM
Depends if its with my group of friends I get them back because we are just joking around. But during tourneys and its intentional that gets me furious and the next serve return and overhead the person at the net better be ready.

Thats not smart. Dont let it phase you at all if you do you are not thinking about the match and doing exactly what the peg was supposed to get you to do.

must be an idiot if your opponent hits one at his own partner ....

I caught that as well. I was like why are they hitting at themselves that makes no sense. I have hit a dubs partner and been hit in the back and it sucks when it happens but **** happens.

Ronaldo
02-16-2011, 08:19 PM
must be an idiot if your opponent hits one at his own partner ....

Must pick idiots cuz ma padner served one up in ma temple. Didn't know it was 3 on 1 till her 1st serve. Just Bring It?

equinox
02-16-2011, 09:31 PM
Hs tennis anything goes.
I was in a lose situation at 1 dubs. After having 3 overheads hit me within the first 3 games i did not hesistate to serve a first serve (AT) the guy doing this nonsense.

based off this posting, i really don't believe you should be throwing stones.

unlike yourself i keep my emotions under control.

if the percentage play calls for intimidation, then a quick peg at start of doubles can keep them further away from net. it's a logical play to test out my opposition net skills.

TenS_Ace
02-17-2011, 06:09 PM
anytime I've been hit by a ball and the opponent(s) apologize, I always quip with "it's only a tennis ball...I'd hate if it was a hockey puck".. you'd have to understand hockey to know what it is like to get hit with a puck in an unprotected area! Get your stitches and get back out there!!:twisted:

Ronaldo
02-18-2011, 02:14 AM
anytime I've been hit by a ball and the opponent(s) apologize, I always quip with "it's only a tennis ball...I'd hate if it was a hockey puck".. you'd have to understand hockey to know what it is like to get hit with a puck in an unprotected area! Get your stitches and get back out there!!:twisted:

Play doubles with two guys who were/are baseball catchers. They may think this thread is a joke.

Topaz
02-18-2011, 03:11 AM
So in tonight's mixed match (7.0), my 3.5 partner gave our 3.5 female opponent a black eye. She was poaching, he was hitting his BH (his strongest shot), and she almost got her racquet on it. But it was a hard shot, she kind of framed it, and her racquet hit her in the face. She had a purple welt by the end of the match. She was also...totally cool with the whole thing. She was very aggressive at net and knew what she was getting into...she could see that my partner hit hard. She didn't back off and I don't think she should have, either.

Buffster
02-18-2011, 04:32 AM
Really depends on whether or not it was intentional and how often it happens. If someone is regularly aiming at my face during a match I'll definitely go for payback. If I get hit unintentionally I really don't care and just deal with the pain.

dominikk1985
02-18-2011, 04:37 AM
I think you shouldn't try to hit one. just play the ball past the net player.

But what is also important that the net player reacts properly.

you should cover the net, but when you hit a pop up that bounces chest high on the service line, just go to one side.

He will make the point anyway, so don't make it hard not to hit your body.

there are many players who hop up and down in such a situation and try to distract the other player. if you do that it's no wonder if you get hit.

Hewex
02-18-2011, 05:20 AM
This week, one of the pro's at my old club got hit in the side of the head. It detached his retina. He was driving home afterward and all of a sudden he lost his sight in that eye. He was driven to the ER. They placed a gas bubble in his eye to get his retina back into place and now he has to sit up and basically not move for 6 weeks, otherwise he could lose his sight.

But, no one ever really gets hurt right?

levy1
02-18-2011, 06:47 AM
In my last last match I faced a kid I think was nut hunting, but I just ingored it and continued playing my game.

No problem if they hit me, but going after my female partner is another story.

stoo
02-18-2011, 07:04 AM
What's that line from the movie "The Untouchables" ? ....."they put one of your's in the infirmary, you put one of their's in the morgue."

I got beaned 3 times in one set last year in a men's doubles match and as my partner and I were getting soundly beaten, I'm pretty sure the guy who hit me all 3 times was teeing it up and aiming at me. Needless to say the next overhead I had the chance to hit was headed in his direction. Unfortunately that chance didn't come around.

I have no problem if I get hit when I'm at the net and wouldn't retaliate if it was a one off thing. But 3 times in one set? Payback is in order.

Ronaldo
02-18-2011, 01:12 PM
This don't happen often at 4.0 and above. The balls come back. Unless playing with the wild men from Beantown.

Cindysphinx
02-18-2011, 01:30 PM
So in tonight's mixed match (7.0), my 3.5 partner gave our 3.5 female opponent a black eye. She was poaching, he was hitting his BH (his strongest shot), and she almost got her racquet on it. But it was a hard shot, she kind of framed it, and her racquet hit her in the face. She had a purple welt by the end of the match. She was also...totally cool with the whole thing. She was very aggressive at net and knew what she was getting into...she could see that my partner hit hard. She didn't back off and I don't think she should have, either.

Ha!!!

I know who you are talking about. The lady who got hit is my Number One, Go-To BFF partner. I love playing with her because if I hit a good serve, she will poach a huge percentage of returns. She has these velvety hands and ridiculous anticipation, plus she is tall with big wingspan. We have pulled off some ridiculous upsets.

She says she is OK, and we are playing tomorrow. I hope she continues patrolling the net and isn't spooked!

Chemistry in doubles is a strange thing. Topaz, you've seen her game (in fact, you won last night). She is not unbeatable. But together, her strengths/weaknesses dovetail perfectly with mine.

gameboy
02-18-2011, 01:52 PM
What's that line from the movie "The Untouchables" ? ....."they put one of your's in the infirmary, you put one of their's in the morgue."

I got beaned 3 times in one set last year in a men's doubles match and as my partner and I were getting soundly beaten, I'm pretty sure the guy who hit me all 3 times was teeing it up and aiming at me. Needless to say the next overhead I had the chance to hit was headed in his direction. Unfortunately t that chance didn't come aroud.

I have no problem if I get hit when I'm at the net and wouldn't retaliate if it was a one off thing. But 3 times in one set? Payback is in order.

See the difference? If you don't want to get hit, don't put yourself or your partner in the situation to get teed off.

Topaz
02-18-2011, 05:00 PM
Ha!!!

I know who you are talking about. The lady who got hit is my Number One, Go-To BFF partner. I love playing with her because if I hit a good serve, she will poach a huge percentage of returns. She has these velvety hands and ridiculous anticipation, plus she is tall with big wingspan. We have pulled off some ridiculous upsets.

She says she is OK, and we are playing tomorrow. I hope she continues patrolling the net and isn't spooked!

Chemistry in doubles is a strange thing. Topaz, you've seen her game (in fact, you won last night). She is not unbeatable. But together, her strengths/weaknesses dovetail perfectly with mine.

Cindy, I remembered her from our dc team last summer. They were a HARD team to play against and my partner and I had had very tough matches in va for our nova team just the night before and we were just kind of plum ticketed out. My partner felt really bad, but he really was just hitting his regular stroke cross court...she just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time (which, when you're poaching, is a split second away from the right place and the right time!).

I'm glad she is good to go! I told her she should make up some really awesome story about how she got the black eye...fighting off muggers in the metro or something like that!

Topaz
02-18-2011, 05:01 PM
^^^tuckered out, not ticketed!!! Stupid phone!! Lol

TenS_Ace
02-18-2011, 06:24 PM
This week, one of the pro's at my old club got hit in the side of the head. It detached his retina. He was driving home afterward and all of a sudden he lost his sight in that eye. He was driven to the ER. They placed a gas bubble in his eye to get his retina back into place and now he has to sit up and basically not move for 6 weeks, otherwise he could lose his sight.

But, no one ever really gets hurt right?
Like I said, at least it wasn't a PUCK...I got hit with a tennis ball in the eye, torn pupil and iris, my left pupil from now on, is stuck, which means it does not close or open with the light available, I still say good thing it wasn't a puck, much more damage would have been done.:)

SlapChop
02-21-2011, 12:52 PM
I'll apologize if I hit someone and I could careless if I get hit. I should be able to hit any ball with my raquet that can hit me. You spend the whole game chasing the ball don't get mad if it catches you. However I have never been hit in the face or got a black eye for playing tennis. I might return fire if I think someone hit me in face on purpose. Also hitting in the feet doesn't count.

gameboy
02-21-2011, 01:56 PM
I got NAILED by my doubles partner on Sat in my ear. His serve is one of the hardest in my circle and he hit me with his first serve.

It hurt, my ears rang for a little, and I had to put ice on it and it was swollen the next day.

But in the big scheme of things, it wasn't so bad (I continued playing within a minute). Certainly better than getting hit in the nuts.

Ronaldo
02-21-2011, 03:02 PM
I got NAILED by my doubles partner on Sat in my ear. His serve is one of the hardest in my circle and he hit me with his first serve.

It hurt, my ears rang for a little, and I had to put ice on it and it was swollen the next day.

But in the big scheme of things, it wasn't so bad (I continued playing within a minute). Certainly better than getting hit in the nuts.

Yes, it may be quite bad http://www.cauliflowerears.net/Files/Cauliflower%20ears%20in%20Rugby.png

gameboy
02-21-2011, 03:13 PM
I don't think that is from getting hit by a tennis ball, not even by a rugby ball for that matter...

Ronaldo
02-21-2011, 03:24 PM
I don't think that is from getting hit by a tennis ball, not even by a rugby ball for that matter...

Received seven stitches after being hit by my dubs partner. We parted ways after he parted my face.

big bang
02-21-2011, 03:32 PM
Its a tennisball! it doesnt hurt to get hit anywhere besides the eye. If someone hits me on purpose I will hit him twice as hard. It happened a few times in doubles and the next time the guys at the net in my service game I somehow misshit my first serve right at him and it stops there.. It might be bad sportsmanship, but I grew up in a very bad area and if someone messed with you the only way to survive was to hit him as hard as possible. I cant help acting this way, but I never start trouble myself, Im a nice guy as long as you dont act like a ***** on court.

Ronaldo
02-21-2011, 03:49 PM
Its a tennisball! it doesnt hurt to get hit anywhere besides the eye. If someone hits me on purpose I will hit him twice as hard. It happened a few times in doubles and the next time the guys at the net in my service game I somehow misshit my first serve right at him and it stops there.. It might be bad sportsmanship, but I grew up in a very bad area and if someone messed with you the only way to survive was to hit him as hard as possible. I cant help acting this way, but I never start trouble myself, Im a nice guy as long as you dont act like a ***** on court.

He hit me with his racquet.

justinmadison
02-21-2011, 04:15 PM
I have one of the best, true, getting hit stories I know. I was hit at very close range, in the nuts, by an over head. I spent the first few minutes on the ground, gasping for air, squirming in a tiny circle trying to find a position that did not hurt so badly. :) Around a month or so later my nut was still not happy so I went to an urologist. After the examination he announced that I had testicular cancer. I explained about the tennis ball and he decided that the blow made me pay attention to my neither region and that is how I recognized the problem. He sent me to get a sonogram to verify his diagnosis. The radiologist who read the sonogram said it was late stage testicular cancer and I should have an operation immediately. They tried to get me in that day, Friday, but could not get an operating room until the following Monday. I spend the weekend reading Lance Armstrong’s book and working on my will. After the operation on Monday they let me know that I had a hematoma. :cry:

This really happened, to me.

Ronaldo
02-21-2011, 04:20 PM
I have one of the best, true, getting hit stories I know. I was hit at very close range, in the nuts, by an over head. I spent the first few minutes on the ground, gasping for air, squirming in a tiny circle trying to find a position that did not hurt so badly. :) Around a month or so later my nut was still not happy so I went to an urologist. After the examination he announced that I had testicular cancer. I explained about the tennis ball and he decided that the blow made me pay attention to my neither region and that is how I recognized the problem. He sent me to get a sonogram to verify his diagnosis. The radiologist who read the sonogram said it was late stage testicular cancer and I should have an operation immediately. They tried to get me in that day, Friday, but could not get an operating room until the following Monday. I spend the weekend reading Lance Armstrong’s book and working on my will. After the operation on Monday they let me know that I had a hematoma. :cry:

This really happened, to me.

So, like, they still did not remove them?

Angle Queen
02-21-2011, 04:43 PM
^^^

Yikes, Justin. That's awful. Please tell us you're old enough to be "done" having/wanting kids. TC is no joke. Neither is a hematoma in Pleasure Zones. :(

Long-term recovery?

justinmadison
02-21-2011, 05:43 PM
So, like, they still did not remove them?

They pulled it out, looked it over, and put it back in. They go in through your stomach for some reason.

To add to the story after two days of misery at home, it was an outpatient surgery, my wife was looking for my pain meds. I kept telling her it was the half empty bottle on the bathroom counter. She finally announced that the half full bottle was antihistamines and the totally full bottle in the drawer was my pain meds. :)

Ronaldo
02-21-2011, 06:07 PM
Wow, feel bad about the dozens and dozens of players I've nailed in the jewels after that story. Most seemed to coughed them up later, avoided surgery.

only4theweak187
02-22-2011, 09:14 AM
Leander used to target the net player on purpose and hit him to get a point lolol

Mac_Attack
02-22-2011, 09:18 AM
In a lackadaisical ladies practice last week (hot temps and w/o my regular partner) and got gobsmacked by a volley. Jammed my sunglasses into my visor and slammed 'em back down across the bridge of my nose. It's turned into one heckuva shiner.

Since I like to think I defend myself and my court position fairly well, it's rare for me to get hit. In this instance, we are all teammates and I know there was no ill-will intended.

But as I sit here with the ice pack still on my face trying to get the swelling down, I think of the few other times I've been hit and wondered how you other players handle those situations. Since this mostly happens in doubles, how do you and/or your partner react in those situations?

My own experiences are that if someone hits my ladies partner, I'm gonna put one close to our opponents at the next opportunity (usually because I'm usually the one at net)...and that's that. Never in/at the face...but close enough for them to get the idea. If I'm the one getting the close call, I just shrug it off...pride bruised a bit...and hope to get my racket on it better next time. Funny how I'm willing to avenge her...but not myself.

In mixed, the situation is quite different. If they hit my male partner...he generally will seek the revenge himself but only if it was the opposing man who did it. If it was the woman who did it, we'll laugh it off as a (un)lucky shot. But if I get hit (regardless which gender opponent did it)...my partner is all set to hit the guy (again, regardless of who actually "hit" me). I try to talk him out of it. Kind of a double-standard, I suppose, given how I try to take care of my ladies partner.

So what do ya'll think/do?

I shrug it off, and try not to show that it bothered me at all, careful not to even rub at where I was tagged -- even if it hurts ... a lot. Then I say, "nice shot," slap my partners hand and get pumped up for the next point. I get even by winning the match.

Gemini
02-22-2011, 09:42 AM
I'm never a fan of head-hunting though I've played some that use this tactic pretty freely. There was one guy I played that was so bent on INTENTIONALLY hitting at me and my partner that on one occasion my partner hit a floater/sitter and at the last second I bolted out of the court knowing this numbskull was head-hunting. He STILL attempted to hit me and ended up losing the point when the shot missed me and landed out. At that point, things got kind of nasty on the court and there were lots "words" exchanged.

The fact is it's never cool to go after so one even if hitting them guarantees you the point. I start playing a lot more aggressively but I almost never hit my shots at my opponents out of malice.

gameboy
02-22-2011, 10:54 AM
The fact is it's never cool to go after so one even if hitting them guarantees you the point. I start playing a lot more aggressively but I almost never hit my shots at my opponents out of malice.

How the heck am I supposed to know whether or not you are doing it out of malice or not? It is completely up to the receiver on how to interpret it.

If you don't want to get hit, don't go to the net and don't server up sitters. Otherwise, it is part of the game and live with it.

Gemini
02-23-2011, 04:55 AM
How the heck am I supposed to know whether or not you are doing it out of malice or not? It is completely up to the receiver on how to interpret it.

If you don't want to get hit, don't go to the net and don't server up sitters. Otherwise, it is part of the game and live with it.

Are you talking about my statement about hitting more aggressively? When I refer to hitting more aggressively, I don't mean hitting at someone. I mean more pace, deeper shots, more angles (if that's the case)..just all out attacking more, but once again I'm talking about my level of play and my personal game. I don't see any reason to "return the favor" in terms of hitting my opponents when my partner's been hit.

As for the philosophy of "don't go to the net if you don't want to get hit", that's an over-simplification. There are so many variables that come into play during a point. If a point is happening so quickly, that a quick volley results in someone being hit with the ball, that's understandable (non-malicious) But when a slow moving ball that gives you a considerable amount of time to set up and take an aggressive swing is offered up, I believe there should be some moral judgement in that situation. If you choose to go after someone that is otherwise not in the line of fire. I'd say that's pretty malicious. I'm not saying you shouldn't take the advantage of hitting in someone's direction or even hitting toward the lower portion of their body. But the act of trying to hit someone because it's a guaranteed point for you when there are options is always malicious in my mind.

And saying don't serve up sitters? Even the pros can't avoid this situation. How can you expect mere mortals to do any better?

Just my .02

equinox
02-23-2011, 06:56 AM
I'm never a fan of head-hunting though I've played some that use this tactic pretty freely. There was one guy I played that was so bent on INTENTIONALLY hitting at me and my partner that on one occasion my partner hit a floater/sitter and at the last second I bolted out of the court knowing this numbskull was head-hunting. He STILL attempted to hit me and ended up losing the point when the shot missed me and landed out. At that point, things got kind of nasty on the court and there were lots "words" exchanged.

The fact is it's never cool to go after so one even if hitting them guarantees you the point. I start playing a lot more aggressively but I almost never hit my shots at my opponents out of malice.

that's funny.

one of first things drilled into junior groups is not to be afraid of the ball.

an old coach used to hit sky lobs and we'd try smash them on the full, half the time we'd miss/hit and cop a ball in the face. taught us to watch the ball and use our other hand to judge distance.

he'd fire quickshot balls from service line directly at us and we had to survive. taught us not to swing on volleys and keep racket ready out in front.

we'd also play butts up or *** when he was not watching..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ej_pwbgMMJs

though little closer just behind the service line 3/4 court area. :D

Gemini
02-23-2011, 07:05 AM
that's funny.

one of first things drilled into junior groups is not to be afraid of the ball.

an old coach used to hit sky lobs and we'd try smash them on the full, half the time we'd miss/hit and cop a ball in the face. taught us to watch the ball and use our other hand to judge distance.

he'd fire quickshot balls from service line directly at us and we had to survive. taught us not to swing on volleys and keep racket ready out in front.

we'd also play butts up or *** when he was not watching..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ej_pwbgMMJs

though little closer just behind the service line 3/4 court area. :D

Understandable to not be afraid of the ball. I was actually bolting out of the court as bait. Just to truly see if this guy was head-hunting....and he was.

equinox
02-23-2011, 07:15 AM
Understandable to not be afraid of the ball. I was actually bolting out of the court as bait. Just to truly see if this guy was head-hunting....and he was.

or maybe he just angling the smash to the side fences.. :)

Gemini
03-09-2011, 07:15 AM
or maybe he just angling the smash to the side fences.. :)

He was quite successful in that case....:) I swear it was like dodging a heat seeking missile.

cghipp
03-09-2011, 10:00 AM
Understandable to not be afraid of the ball. I was actually bolting out of the court as bait. Just to truly see if this guy was head-hunting....and he was.Reading this, I have to tell about something that I did in a match last year. I don't have the best focus in the world, and I was going for an "easy" overhead with my opponent right in front of me at the net. I was thinking about hitting my overhead into the alley to her right. Normally I do have a decent amount of control on this shot.

Just as I was going to hit the ball, she darted off of the right-hand side of the court (my left-hand side). My ball followed her OFF THE COURT like it was a heat-seeking missile. (OK, a pretty inaccurate heat-seeking missile.) Thank god I didn't hit her - I could really have hurt her. It was a hard-hit ball. It was extremely embarrassing and actually very scary to me - I was quite shaken. I apologized profusely, knowing that she might well have thought I was a crazy person. She didn't get angry but that may well have been because she didn't really see what had just happened.

I don't know if it was that she caught my eye as she was moving and I followed the movement subconsciously, or that the idea of NOT hitting her was so prominent in my mind that I was thinking about her more than the ball... Either way, it left a serious impression on me and I have been very careful to not let it happen again!

cghipp
03-09-2011, 10:02 AM
He was quite successful in that case....:) I swear it was like dodging a heat seeking missile.... and I swear that I did not read this "heat seeking missile" comment before I wrote that. It's just the perfect description for that action!

Gemini
03-09-2011, 10:14 AM
... and I swear that I did not read this "heat seeking missile" comment before I wrote that. It's just the perfect description for that action!


LOL!!! I understand. The shot my opponentstruck barely missed hitting in the face and I SWEAR I could feel heat as the ball whizzed by right cheek.

Fuji
03-09-2011, 07:11 PM
Just skimmed through a bit...

But I have been hit a few times. I don't really mind, it just means I wasn't good enough to get it back. I like to work on reflexes, so getting hit just means I was too slow! I've had some people really try to drive me off the net with hard, flat shots. I don't really mind though, More often then not, I just have to touch it a bit to hit it back for a winner.

I've only hit anyone once with a tennis ball. It was when I was learning how hard my smash really is... Short lob right in my strike zone, probably around a 85-90 MPH overhead, straight down at the opposing net players... foot. Yup, I cranked him with one of my harder over heads of the very top of his foot. We just laughed it off, since he wasn't in too much pain. The next day he send me a picture of a perfect circle bruise on his foot. It was entertaining, but a total accident.

If you've ever seen the world team tennis match with McEnroe vs Roddick, that was pretty entertaining. McEnroe was really starting to drill it at Roddick, straight into his chest a few times. Just goes to show, even sometimes pro's can't dodge it.

By the way, I always play with some type of head covering. Mostly a hat. I've never had an issue of a ball hitting my hat and injuring me. From the sounds of it, you just got some seriously bad luck on that shot! :p

-Fuji

Carolina Racquet
03-09-2011, 10:07 PM
If I get hit, I try to downplay it and not let it show that I'm angry or upset... or hurt. It's just a tennis ball after all! Very different than a baseball player getting hit by a HARD ball going 80+MPH!

9 times out of 10, if you get hit, the anger should be directed more to your partner who probably hit the floater that set up the smash, but that needs to be internalized :)

cghipp
03-09-2011, 10:44 PM
A lot of the times, if I get hit I'm already laughing before the ball hits me, because I know I was out of position or I didn't have my racquet in front of me. Of course, that doesn't apply to situations where the person was truly going after me. That doesn't happen too often, though.

Mauvaise
03-22-2011, 02:03 PM
I play a lot of doubles and mixed doubles, but at a 3.0-3.5 level. I've been hit a few times, mostly by the men, and almost only on my feet/legs. When they've apologized after, I told them that none was necessary - that's where they *should* be aiming.

I got hit once in the hand because I couldn't get out of the way in time and misjudged the volley. I shrugged off the apology again because I knew it wasn't intentional.

I notice people have asked more than once how one can tell if they are hit intentionally - you just can. And I don't consider any ball striking me below the knees to be the 'bad' kind of intentional because I've been taught to aim at your opponents feet, so I expect the same in return.

I've also hit people, but I can assure you that it's totally by accident because my aim isn't so good. I'm usually trying for a 'line drive' passing shot which ends up making a beeline for one of my opponents. Even if they deflect the ball off their racket I always apologize because I 1) feel terrible about hitting or almost hitting someone and 2) don't want them to think I was deliberately trying to strike them with the ball.

dizzlmcwizzl
03-22-2011, 02:58 PM
I had another "incident" regarding mixed that I found to be funny.

The woman at the front desk of my club invited me to play in a social 7.0 mixed doubles event at the club. She is 65-70 and is a really weak 3.0 player. When she asked me to play she was blushing, could not look me in the eye and stammered when she asked me to play .... "would you go to the Sadi Haw ... er, play mixed with me?" When I said sure, she was shocked. In her mind I was a 4.0 that would give her the chance to make up for all those dismal performances she had endured over the years. For weeks leading up to the event the other folks at the club had complimented me on my generosity for playing with her. When the pro made the draw for the event he even seeded us which perhaps made her happiest of all.

The night of the event came and my partner and I were ready to knock out the competition. I had scouting information on our opponents and a real gameplan for the evening. The format was 8 game pro-sets with the eventual winners playing a total of 3 or 4 sets in the evening. If you lost you played consolation matches until everyone had played 4 matches.

In the first set of the night my partner was serving for the set and a chance to move into the thrid round when our opponents figured out I was the best player in the draw that night and my partner was the worst. We were broken and continued to lose in the breaker relegating us to the consolation rounds. But my partner was happy because these were the most games she had won at any of her previous tournies.

We won the next 2 consolation matches and were playing in the final match of the evening against a decent 3.5/3.5 combination. This was a chance for us to "win" the losers bracket ... a real accomplishment for us! However, the other team also recognized the disparity in our levels and had the skill set to exploit it. My partner had the unfortunate habbit of moving just far enough into the court that every shot for her was difficult. She OWNED no mans land. This unfortunate behavior also manage to put her in position to be attacked on her short lobs with the opponents overheads ... which they consistently did to us. On the 4th short lob of hers, the man on the other team hit an overhead into her abdomen. I think she was more shocked than hurt but I could see she was upset.

I walked over to her and in an attempt to pick up her spirits I said "If this were a USTA match and someone did that to my partner I would have to drill them with the next shot". She smiled, chuckled for a second and then said ... "OK, I would like that". Now we were both laughing at the prosepct of retaliating in a social event against a guy also in his late 60's for a shot that was not that hard. But this is where it gets good.

Two points later I have an overhead ... which I swear I was not aiming at the guy ... I hit the ball on the T which was wide open and he is at the baseline. Unfortunately he attempts to get this ball because he must win the losers bracket final. The ball after the bounce raises to about head high on the baseline. He has committed to getting the ball and puts his racket up ... he has misjudged the velocity of the ball and does not realize that at the speed I have hit the ball it will knock the racket out of his hands, pushing the now airborn racket into his face with the ball now deflecting up over the screens between the nets. He yells in agony, while my partner starts laughing histerically at the back of the court, becasue she thinks I did it on purpose to defend her honor.

A good night all around.

DizzlMcWizzl

equinox
03-22-2011, 04:02 PM
if a player is still standing after a pegging then they're fine. when player drops to ground with blood streaming from face, then an hand wave off apology is perhaps in order. a towel offering as a token gesture would hopefully be appreciated.

before matches i stand against fence and partner takes shots at me from 6 metres closing upto 3.

kind of like blaster droid light saber deflection training luke skywalker undertakes on millennium falcon. takes away any fear of pegging and prepares body for battle.

imho players shouldn't let anger or thoughts of revenge or honor dictate the course of actions oncourt.

Fuji
03-22-2011, 04:24 PM
LOL! Equinox, that was a great post. A+

I think I might have to get into your ritual of taking shots from 6m to 3m, to advance to 5.0. My net game will only improve with that skill set!!

-Fuji

J_R_B
03-22-2011, 06:42 PM
Here is a extreme case of what not to do

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMr_RzCGWOw

What not to do? By whom? Correct me if I'm wrong, but Kendrick should have won the point where he hit Paes on the fly on the serve, no? The only "what not to do" in this was Adams.

J_R_B
03-22-2011, 06:48 PM
if a player is still standing after a pegging then they're fine. when player drops to ground with blood streaming from face, then an hand wave off apology is perhaps in order. a towel offering as a token gesture would hopefully be appreciated.

before matches i stand against fence and partner takes shots at me from 6 metres closing upto 3.

kind of like blaster droid light saber deflection training luke skywalker undertakes on millennium falcon. takes away any fear of pegging and prepares body for battle.

imho players shouldn't let anger or thoughts of revenge or honor dictate the course of actions oncourt.

In high school, I used to charge the net when I hit a weak lob that I saw was going to be smashed. I figured that (1) it might occassionally throw people off and make them miss to see someone charging an overhead and (2) I would have a much better chance to get a lucky block back if I tried to shorten the shot I had to hit and hit it before the other guy could get it out wide on an angle. (1) worked more often then (2), although I did return a handful of shots, too. I got plunked at close range even more than both (1) and (2) combined, though. I just shrugged it off and went back to get ready for the next shot. Tennis balls don't hurt. I also got hit in the side of the face by an errant golf drive by my brother from about 15 yards away. I'll tell you what, a golf ball at that range f-ing hurts. A tennis ball? Not so much...

Gtech
03-22-2011, 07:34 PM
Interesting thread. I am sure glad I don't play with the majority of posters here. I play 4.0 and 4.5 (as a sub) doubles in different leugues. Sure there is the occacional accidental hit, but headhunting? intentional hitting? Retaliation? Nope. You have to be a delinquent 15 yr old fresh out of juvi, or some horrible hack and this is all you can do in a court, or just a someone with some serious mental development issues to think that its "ok" to target and hit and it is part of the game. Only once I saw an imbecil show up that decided to intentionally hit, and the other team just defaulted the match and moved on.
I really hope a lot of the posters in favor of hitting here are just inmature teenagers pretending to be adults.

cknobman
03-23-2011, 07:08 AM
A couple of weeks ago I was playing doubles and when I was hit I regrettably got angry, very angry.

Situation:
Traveled out of town to go play another team for a "friendly scrimmage".
Playing doubles against the other team.
We win 1st set 6-2.
Second set my partner gets hit once in each of the first two games. First time he was hit was no big deal. Second time was a hard volley by the other team that knocked the glasses off my partners face. I was a little upset because my partner was directly across the net from other player and cross court shot was wide open. I shrugged it off and decided to be nice and give benefit of doubt.
Second set 4th game opponent get easy overhead (this was off the bounce too) and I am at net. I easily recognize they have easy winner and drop my racquet and start moving out of way (moving outside of main court into doubles alley) to concede the point. Ball is high and short (2-3 feet past net) and opponent rushes in to put it away. Opponent lets it bounce then smashes his overhead at me as I concede point and move out to doubles alley.

I exploded on the guy and started yelling at him. This was the 3rd hit (by the same guy on the opposing team) within 10 minutes. I warn him that he better stop aiming at us or I am going "go off" on him. We were surrounded by 3 other courts and play stopped on all courts when I went off. Guess I was a little loud and everyone stopped to see what was going on.

For the rest of the match things were very tense and the guy that was hitting us was ****ed for a while slamming things around and swinging as hard as he could at every ball. Ironically he did not come close to hitting my partner nor I for the rest of the match.

For the record we went 3 sets and the other team won 7-6 in third set.

Was I out of line?

GPB
03-23-2011, 07:16 AM
Was I out of line?
3rd hit in under 10 minutes, plus you were conceding the point? Nah, you're not out of line. A couple things to learn from this situation, though:

1: Never drop your racket, as you said you did.

2: When conceding the point (they have a close-range overhead) don't just step to the alley, PIVOT and step towards the alley with your back to the net. It'll hurt less.

Hewex
03-23-2011, 07:27 AM
I saw a guy this weekend standing inside the service line who got drilled in chest, just about the heart with an short overhead. The guy who hit him is a little guy, but built like a freakin tank. They both handled it the right way. The tank guy apologized gave the guy who got hit as much time as he needed to recover and the 'hit' guy didn't blow up. I've never seen anyone get hit harder on a tennis court.