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Larrysümmers
08-10-2010, 11:59 AM
what are your best tips for weaving faster? weaving takes me a while and it gets annoying so if anyone has any tips please feel free to enlighten me if you will :)

Six.One.Tour.90FAN
08-10-2010, 12:22 PM
wrong section

if if the string is greasy or stiff, weaving a loop is easier than
normally pushing the string through

90

Larrysümmers
08-10-2010, 12:24 PM
oops my bad, i didnt even see they had a new section for tips and whatnot my bad

drakulie
08-10-2010, 12:39 PM
just a couple quick pointers:

1. Pull enough string through the grommet to reach the other side of the frame before beginning to weave.

2. weave in a diagonal angle, rather than straight across.

3. Practice.

hopefully, more posters will chime in with more tips.

Good luck.

Larrysümmers
08-10-2010, 12:55 PM
just a couple quick pointers:

1. Pull enough string through the grommet to reach the other side of the frame before beginning to weave.

2. weave in a diagonal angle, rather than straight across.

3. Practice.

hopefully, more posters will chime in with more tips.

Good luck.

thanks drakulie. i will try those in a few minutes :)

jim e
08-10-2010, 01:02 PM
Be sure to weave one ahead, I'm sure most do that, but just to mention just in case.
Also, I normally start my weaves so the majority of the weaves end going over the last main, then you have a clean shot to put the string through the grommet hole.Also if you start going under the 1st main , you will then be going over the last main, (reverse is also true), this way you will never need to spend time checking your weaves for miss weaves, unless you have the unlikely event of having 2 mis weaves in the same row.I know if I go over the last main, that there is no misweave and never need to check.Saves a little time. The rest is practice.

mikeler
08-10-2010, 01:10 PM
Figure out whether you are faster at push weaving or pull weaving and practice only that method.

TennisNinja
08-10-2010, 01:33 PM
Definitely pull diagonally.

jim e
08-10-2010, 01:59 PM
Definitely pull diagonally.

I can push weave much more efficient than pulling.I would say push diagonally or try both to see what is best for you. Some stringers here push in one direction and pull back. I cannot do that, ( I guess I can but would take me too long, as I am good at push weaving only) . Try both to see what works best for you.

Ash_Smith
08-10-2010, 02:24 PM
what Drak said!

I push weave one way and them pull weave back - faster for me and less spinning the racquet - not that it makes a lot of difference!!!

Ash

mikeler
08-10-2010, 02:52 PM
I'm a pull weaver myself.

kslick
08-10-2010, 03:07 PM
tried pulling and what a mess. Definitely a pusher......

drakulie
08-10-2010, 04:43 PM
what Drak said!

I push weave one way and them pull weave back - faster for me and less spinning the racquet - not that it makes a lot of difference!!!

Ash



I'm working on this technique, Ash. I think when I get it down, it will definitely make stringing a bit easier/smoother, and faster.

themitchmann
08-10-2010, 04:46 PM
Total pusher.

Also, cut the tip of the string at an angle.

bhupaes
08-10-2010, 04:52 PM
Takes me around 50 minutes to string my racquet. I don't mind since it's very therapeutic and I love doing it. Good way to get some peace and quiet when the family is driving me nuts. :)

Larrysümmers
08-10-2010, 08:15 PM
just a couple quick pointers:

1. Pull enough string through the grommet to reach the other side of the frame before beginning to weave.

2. weave in a diagonal angle, rather than straight across.

3. Practice.

hopefully, more posters will chime in with more tips.

Good luck.

this was a life saver!!it was so much easier to weave!!

thank you to everyone :)

meowmix
08-10-2010, 08:21 PM
On some of the greasier strings, wipe the string down before you string it to get some of the excess silicone off. That or keep a napkin handy.

struggle
08-11-2010, 06:01 AM
this was a life saver!!it was so much easier to weave!!

thank you to everyone :)

also, in a tight weave or tight spot (halfway through crosses) sometimes it helps to weave half way across the mains and pull slack through again, much like you did through the grommet initially.

McLovin
08-11-2010, 06:20 AM
Not sure if this applies, but..

I always setup my crosses so the main portion of them start on an 'over'. In other words, if the 1st cross skips 1 main, then I start it under, and from there on, until the last cross, all start 'over'.

If the 1st cross skips 2 mains, then I start it 'over', the 2nd cross starts 'under', and from there on, until the last 1 or 2 (depending on the pattern), all start 'over'.

Takes less thought and helps prevent mis-weaves. In fact, I don't believe I have mis-weaved in over 15 years.

jim e
08-11-2010, 06:29 AM
Not sure if this applies, but..

I always setup my crosses so the main portion of them start on an 'over'. In other words, if the 1st cross skips 1 main, then I start it under, and from there on, until the last cross, all start 'over'.

If the 1st cross skips 2 mains, then I start it 'over', the 2nd cross starts 'under', and from there on, until the last 1 or 2 (depending on the pattern), all start 'over'.

Takes less thought and helps prevent mis-weaves. In fact, I don't believe I have mis-weaved in over 15 years.

Actually I do the exact opposite, and end up going over the majority of the last main strings with the cross string weaving. This way, its an easier shot to weave and put the end of the string into the grommet hole as the string is on top of the last main.At least its easier for me this way.
I guess it like any other preference, like push or pull weaving, or both like some talented stringers do.

McLovin
08-11-2010, 03:56 PM
Actually I do the exact opposite, and end up going over the majority of the last main strings with the cross string weaving. This way, its an easier shot to weave and put the end of the string into the grommet hole as the string is on top of the last main.At least its easier for me this way.
I guess it like any other preference, like push or pull weaving, or both like some talented stringers do.

I guess if I had read you post earlier I would have realized someone already mentioned this. Bad reading on my part.

Anyway, my point wasn't really which way to start, just that you are consistent every time you string. But now you've got me thinking I should start under instead of over...

mikeler
08-12-2010, 10:50 AM
I guess if I had read you post earlier I would have realized someone already mentioned this. Bad reading on my part.

Anyway, my point wasn't really which way to start, just that you are consistent every time you string. But now you've got me thinking I should start under instead of over...


I always like to finish over on the last cross string. Makes it easier to get the string through the grommet for me.

Technatic
08-12-2010, 10:13 PM
what are your best tips for weaving faster? weaving takes me a while and it gets annoying so if anyone has any tips please feel free to enlighten me if you will

Hi guys,
I know that being able to weave fast is a quality of an experienced stringer, and all these tips are certainly very useful.

However it is also the proud of a craftsman to have the latest tools that are available.

So once you are fed up with weaving and especially those stiff monos, invest in these tools.
It is easier, faster and better for the string and .....for your back.

Just have a look at this guy, I do not think many stringers can push and pull the string through (without friction) as fast as he can.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoktfpQE4C0

What do you think??

I may be not so fast but much faster than without the tools, use them many years already.
Because the level of concentration can be lower, it seems easier to do more stringjobs after each other.

http://a.imageshack.us/img651/540/crossstrinteralu1kl2.jpg

drakulie
08-13-2010, 06:04 AM
^^^There was a thread with a lot of information on this tool. One guy even posted photos of one of these that he had from over 20???? years ago?

Anyway, those who have used it really like it. However, to me it seems a bit cumbersome to use.

MAX PLY
08-13-2010, 06:49 AM
Actually the Stringway device makes some sense. I am not sure that experienced stringers will find it worth the extra time and set up (I suspect I can weave a string as fast or faster as it takes the user of the device to move it, reset it and insert the string) but the lower friction it purports to provide strikes me as by far its best attribute (and again, most experienced stringers can minimize friction without such a device). Having stated that, I have not tried it and probably won't purchase one anytime soon but if I still strung a ton of gut on a regular basis, it might be worth the investment.

drakulie
08-13-2010, 06:55 AM
^^^That's what I was thinking, Max. It's best use might be for stringing Natural Gut.

Ash_Smith
08-13-2010, 09:45 AM
^^^Yep, looking at the video I'm sure it'll take me more time using the tool than weaving by hand - that said I guess new stringers might find it useful and if you know no other method maybe this will be quicker for you.

Wonder if the lack of friction on weaving causes any change in DT after? I would assume not because when you pull tension the string is back in full contact with the mains but it would be interesting to check.

Ash

Technatic
08-14-2010, 02:36 AM
Guys please excuse me:
I was on a sales show a couple of years ago, standing on the Stringway booth (being a Stringway follower for many years).
The SW guy was demonstrating the prototype of the new cross stringers.
Then a rather famous Wimbledon stringer joined the discussion and watched the use of the tool.
So the SW guy asked him: “What do you think of this tool?”
The guy said: This is a good tool for people who do not know how to get the string through”.

So the SW guy said: “So you can do faster?”
“ Certainly”, the Wimbledon guy answered.

So:
The SW guy pushed 2 strings through very relaxed and could pull the string through as fast as he could (without the need to pull under an angle).

Then the W-guy did the same.
And hat to admit that he was slower………… this time.

My conclusion as a spectator was: It was no match.

And this was with an easy to weave nylon string.
With the tool it does not make a difference if you weave monos, gut or nylon, so with a mono or gut the difference in speed would have been even bigger

So excuse me again;
I understand that you want to tell how fast you can weave, but I can not believe that someone is faster without the tool, than someone who can use the tool.

No way!

Technatic
08-14-2010, 04:24 AM
Ash_Smith ^^^
Wonder if the lack of friction on weaving causes any change in DT after? I would assume not because when you pull tension the string is back in full contact with the mains but it would be interesting to check.


Hi Ash;
Forgot to answer your questions about the DT value:
Because you do not pull tension through the cross stringer it makes no difference in the DT value.

It does make a difference in your back after doing some racquets after each other:
The old tool that they had was made for wooden racquet and the big alu Prince Pro. So it did not fit 30 % of the modern racquets and I had to do those by hand.

kkm
08-14-2010, 09:59 AM
For what it's worth Ulrich "Uli" Kühnel (stringer for Boris Becker) seems to believe in the cross-stringing tool.

At 2:53
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYCcdWBqNYI

And he famously used a True Tension stringing machine, as did many pro tour stringers in years past. A crank machine. A crank machine as "preferred by American stringers." (from Stringway's marketing materials which denigrate the very market they hope to sell to) :rolleyes: "Stringing on stiffness" was not exclusively an European concept, as much as some might like to think it is. Much of the racquet support issue Stringway promotes seems to have come from the True Tension school of thought on the subject from many years before.

Lots to read:
http://www.truetension.com

And the cross-stringing tools allowing for "the level of concentration" to be lower? Some of the outer mains on some racquets will be out of the reach of the cross-stringing tool, requiring some crosses to be woven without the aid of the cross-stringing tool across these out-of-reach outer mains, and some of the top and bottom crosses to be woven manually in their entirety without the help of the tool. And a stringer needn't be all that experienced to weave one ahead to avoid most of what would otherwise be hard weaves.
Especially with natural gut, if one uses professional technique in pulling the crosses across the mains

as illustrated very nicely by Drakulie here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpfwDvF3Buk

that further removes the need for a cross-stringing tool.

As far as the Wimbledon stringer being slower than the guy pulling the string through with the aid of the Cross Stringing Tool, consider stringing the entire racquet, moving the tool with every cross string, slipping the cross across the mains, tensioning, clamping....does it really save that much time and effort?

interview with Ulrich "Uli" Kühnel:
http://www.saitenforum.de/interviews.php?show=ukuehnel&title=Ulrich%20Kuehnel

Kühnel's IPDS/Xception site:
http://www.tension-advisor.com

jswinf
08-14-2010, 10:21 AM
wrong section


90

Isn't this the right section now after the fairly recent change, or am I (still) confused?

Technatic
08-14-2010, 12:50 PM
I think that it is the right section and the change takes care that this kind of discussions get the right amount of attention.

Technatic
08-14-2010, 01:12 PM
And he famously used a True Tension stringing machine, as did many pro tour stringers in years past. A crank machine. A crank machine as "preferred by American stringers." (from Stringway's marketing materials which denigrate the very market they hope to sell to) "Stringing on stiffness" was not exclusively an European concept, as much as some might like to think it is. Much of the racquet support issue Stringway promotes seems to have come from the True Tension school of thought on the subject from many years before.


You may be right,
But the questions is:
Who was there first the Stringway or True Tension?

In my opinion the racquet support of the True Tension is completely the opposite of what Stringway promotes:
- I thought that True Tension has supports on 6, 12, 3 and 9 o’clock.
This is the ultimate INdirect (outside) support.

- SW has 5 inside supports which is a direct system. The supports push the racquet outwards where the main strings pull it inwards.

Apart from this I do not think that the True Tension tensioner is a Crank machine like all the others.
The big springs are no reference springs they work between the string and the tension head and keep the tension constant during the elongation of the string.

So I think it is a kind of constant pull system.

Or am I wrong?

Ash_Smith
08-14-2010, 02:34 PM
As far as the Wimbledon stringer being slower than the guy pulling the string through with the aid of the Cross Stringing Tool, consider stringing the entire racquet, moving the tool with every cross string, slipping the cross across the mains, tensioning, clamping....does it really save that much time and effort?



Exactly my point!

Ash

Technatic
08-14-2010, 10:43 PM
Ash_Smith Quote:
Originally Posted by kkm
As far as the Wimbledon stringer being slower than the guy pulling the string through with the aid of the Cross Stringing Tool, consider stringing the entire racquet, moving the tool with every cross string, slipping the cross across the mains, tensioning, clamping....does it really save that much time and effort?


Exactly my point!

Ash

Hi Ash,
Of course everybody has to judge the benefits for him self.
But it is not only the time and the convenience that you save:
It also saves finger tips, your back and the string.

I also know that there are people who prefer to use their own skill and others like handy tools.

It is a major thing in life that you believe in what you do and how you do it.

Tecna

kkm
08-15-2010, 09:14 AM
Apart from this I do not think that the True Tension tensioner is a Crank machine like all the others.
The big springs are no reference springs they work between the string and the tension head and keep the tension constant during the elongation of the string.

So I think it is a kind of constant pull system.

Or am I wrong?

As far as I know you're correct on this. I believe that the spring of the True Tension and the spring in the Stringway MS200 are along the same lines.

Dags
08-15-2010, 11:20 AM
But it is not only the time and the convenience that you save:
It also saves finger tips, your back and the string.

I know you're really into your 'stringing science', so would be interested to hear your thoughts on whether such a tool could be detrimental in any way to the stringbed. I understand the benefit of removing friction when you weave - I'm certainly not trying to argue against that - but in order to do that, the tool would have to raise and lower the mains. In general, I wonder what that does to the tension. More specifically, I would be wary about over-stretching poly strings, and repeatedly so.

Any thoughts, or better yet, observations?

kkm
08-15-2010, 03:50 PM
I know you're really into your 'stringing science', so would be interested to hear your thoughts on whether such a tool could be detrimental in any way to the stringbed. I understand the benefit of removing friction when you weave - I'm certainly not trying to argue against that - but in order to do that, the tool would have to raise and lower the mains. In general, I wonder what that does to the tension. More specifically, I would be wary about over-stretching poly strings, and repeatedly so.

Any thoughts, or better yet, observations?

Here's one evaluation:
http://ggtennis.wordpress.com/2009/09/09/stringway-cross-stringing-tool-some-thoughts-and-questions/

drakulie
08-15-2010, 04:04 PM
^^Thanks for the link. Interesting that the found it to have a lower DT when using the tool:

"When using this tool our stringbed stiffness readings are generally 2 – 4 DT points lower than when we string without the use of the tool. This was a bit surprising to us as we surmised the use of the tool would create a stiffer stringbed."

kkm
08-15-2010, 06:44 PM
^^Thanks for the link. Interesting that the found it to have a lower DT when using the tool:

"When using this tool our stringbed stiffness readings are generally 2 – 4 DT points lower than when we string without the use of the tool. This was a bit surprising to us as we surmised the use of the tool would create a stiffer stringbed."

It really doesn't surprise me that the DT reading was a bit lower, as the main strings are being displaced/slightly stretched by the tool, and any resulting slack in the mains wouldn't be compensated for. Plus, I imagine that even straightening the crosses along the way, the strings would be even more inclined to "grin" than usual since the path of least resistance would be greater due to the displaced mains.

Technatic
08-15-2010, 09:43 PM
kkm Quote:
Originally Posted by Dags
I know you're really into your 'stringing science', so would be interested to hear your thoughts on whether such a tool could be detrimental in any way to the stringbed. I understand the benefit of removing friction when you weave - I'm certainly not trying to argue against that - but in order to do that, the tool would have to raise and lower the mains. In general, I wonder what that does to the tension. More specifically, I would be wary about over-stretching poly strings, and repeatedly so.

Any thoughts, or better yet, observations?

Here's one evaluation:
http://ggtennis.wordpress.com/2009/0...and-questions/

Thanks KKM very interesting link and information on that site.
Also interesting that they experienced that the dt value is lower with the tool than without.

My ideas about this:
The tool pushes the mains up and down by about 6 mm. When you start stringing the force to do that is next to nothing because the big free length of the mains. When you come to the end of the crosses the free length of the string smaller and the force to close the tool is considerably higher. It could be there that string stretches.
Iow; When the free length of the main is 80 mm and the deflection is 6 mm this results in an angle of 6/40 is 8,5 degrees.
The cosines of that angle is 0,989 which means that the string would stretch 1,1 %.
This could be the reason that the string looses a little tension, but this will certainly depend on the type of string.
When a string has a high Quality index el/total the loss will be much smaller than with a poly with a bad index.

BUT; you can also look at this stretching as a “prestretch” before play. The string will probably be stretched much more than 1 % on hard hits.
The interesting question can be: Is the dt value also lower after playing??

My experience:
I use the SW Tension advisor to calculate tensions for every racquet in order to get a certain stiffness. Most of the time the result will be 3 to 6 DT points higher directly after stringing than what I aimed at. The reason for this is probably that SW built in some safety margin because it is much worse when you end too low than a little too high.

I do not have a good comparison between using the tool and not using it, I use the new tools for all racquets.
The difference in SBS between different strings is huge, when you string a syn gut you can go down in tension more than one category (3 kg/cm) and with a bad poly you end up at the stiffness that you calculated with.

So I compensate for the type of string from the calculated values.

dancraig
08-16-2010, 12:36 AM
I started weaving "several" ahead a few months ago. I push weave a cross and then pull the next back toward me. I like it. No need to spin the frame while weaving. Since I start out "one ahead" the cross I pull back is the hard weave, so it seems to work out. I leave a loop of string at the ends, of course.
I don't weave "several" ahead with gut, could be to much stress on the string. I have no problem fanning the crosses while stringing several ahead.

I first learned to string "pulling a loop", as many others have. Then I learned how to push weave. It really isn't that difficult to put them both together. It actually feels like the natural thing to do.

drakulie
08-16-2010, 06:00 AM
^^^Hey, Dan. I push weave, and often (with particular synthetics) I weave more than one ahead on several crosses.

I've been pulling my weaves more and more over the last few months (although still clumsy at it). When you push weave and then pull-weave back, what exact process do you do?

For example, you push weave one cross away from you, and don't spin the frame around back towards you, rather pull the weave back. However, do you push the entire lenghth of string thru (leaving a loop of course to reach tensioner)? I wanted to hear your thoughts.

Thanks in advance.

Ash_Smith
08-16-2010, 06:14 AM
Rick

I've been pushing and pulling weaves for a while now and the process is pretty much as you describe. Push the first one away from you until the tip just goes through the grommet and use the loop left behind to pull tension on the previous string. Pull through the string (fanning as normal) and then pull weave the next one back towards yourself until the tip is just through the grommet. Spin the racquet and tension using the loop again. Repeat until finished.

There's no reason you couldn't weave several ahead using this method and leave little loops on the outside as you go t use to pull tension.

Hops that makes sense!

Ash

drakulie
08-16-2010, 06:50 AM
^^Hey, Ashe. Thanks for chiming in.

My question is more based on when you push weave and reach the grommet, how do you get the rest of the string length to the other side without turning the racquet around towards you. It would be awkward to be pulling the string away from your body once the end of the string reaches the grommet.

Hope you understand how I explained that.

Ash_Smith
08-16-2010, 07:10 AM
Sorry - I get you, once you get used to it it's not too bad, as I use my left hand if it's on the far side of the frame to pull the string through - the table turns a little as you do this anyway which makes it easier, but yeah basically I pull it through away from my body. It's not that awkward when
you get used to it (like most things in stinging I guess!)

Ash

drakulie
08-16-2010, 07:20 AM
^^^OK, gotcha. Thanks!

dancraig
08-16-2010, 11:43 PM
^^^Hey, Dan. I push weave, and often (with particular synthetics) I weave more than one ahead on several crosses.

I've been pulling my weaves more and more over the last few months (although still clumsy at it). When you push weave and then pull-weave back, what exact process do you do?

For example, you push weave one cross away from you, and don't spin the frame around back towards you, rather pull the weave back. However, do you push the entire lenghth of string thru (leaving a loop of course to reach tensioner)? I wanted to hear your thoughts.

Thanks in advance.

Hello Drakulie:
I push weave the cross and just insert it in the grommet and then reach over and pull the string through. After viewing your "weave a lot of crosses" video, I decided to add that to my "push/pull" method. (thank-you) I like it. Now I just "play it by ear" and weave crosses until I think it's enough or until the string runs out.

drakulie
08-17-2010, 08:42 AM
^^Thanks, Dan. Much appreciated.

While working on my "pull technique", I'm still trying to figure out how to incoorporate it into my stringing to weed out unecessary wasted movements.

Cheers!

Irvin
08-17-2010, 09:38 AM
^^Thanks, Dan. Much appreciated.

While working on my "pull technique", I'm still trying to figure out how to incoorporate it into my stringing to weed out unecessary wasted movements.

Cheers!

This does not have anything to do with weaving but it will save wasted effort. When you are running your mains run one ahead but do not pull the string all the way through. This way you will have the end of the string right at your fingertips all the time to pull through and run the next main. This really helps when you are doing a one piece string job because of the length of string on the long side.

Irvin

Irvin
08-17-2010, 09:41 AM
Maybe I do something wrong when I do my pull but I really do not like to pull the string. Seems like you have to pull two string at a time through the mains and that can't be faster. If you develop a method when you are only pulling on the tip of the string it may be much quicker.

I am going to have to experiment on this thought.

Irvin

drakulie
08-17-2010, 09:52 AM
This does not have anything to do with weaving but it will save wasted effort. When you are running your mains run one ahead but do not pull the string all the way through. This way you will have the end of the string right at your fingertips all the time to pull through and run the next main. This really helps when you are doing a one piece string job because of the length of string on the long side.

Irvin

Yes, I do this. Sometimes, I will pre weave all the mains on the long side, as you suggest, with one piece stringing.

Irvin
08-17-2010, 09:59 AM
Yes, I do this. Sometimes, I will pre weave all the mains on the long side, as you suggest, with one piece stringing.

I do that sometimes too on the long side but if you want to keep the end of the string handy all that is needed is one ahead. I find when I get to the outside mains when I try to get the clamp as close to the frame as possible sometimes the clamp gets in the way of pushing the string through. When I string ahead that problem is gone.

But when you get to the end and you want to start your crosses maybe it would be better if the end of the string was right there in your hand. So for the last main don't pull it through.

Another small trick I do something is to pull two mains at a time. Holly Cow, what did I say? LOL You bet your sweet bippy I do. I run a main through and pull about three or four feet out and run the next main. Then I hold the loop with my left hand and pull both mains through at the same time with my right holding the end of the string at all times. It seems like I have less coiling this way. I only do this on the long side though.

Irvin

Dags
08-18-2010, 10:19 AM
Here's one evaluation:
http://ggtennis.wordpress.com/2009/09/09/stringway-cross-stringing-tool-some-thoughts-and-questions/
Thanks KKM very interesting link and information on that site.
Also interesting that they experienced that the dt value is lower with the tool than without.

My ideas about this:
The tool pushes the mains up and down by about 6 mm. When you start stringing the force to do that is next to nothing because the big free length of the mains. When you come to the end of the crosses the free length of the string smaller and the force to close the tool is considerably higher. It could be there that string stretches.
Iow; When the free length of the main is 80 mm and the deflection is 6 mm this results in an angle of 6/40 is 8,5 degrees.
The cosines of that angle is 0,989 which means that the string would stretch 1,1 %.
This could be the reason that the string looses a little tension, but this will certainly depend on the type of string.
When a string has a high Quality index el/total the loss will be much smaller than with a poly with a bad index.

BUT; you can also look at this stretching as a “prestretch” before play. The string will probably be stretched much more than 1 % on hard hits.
The interesting question can be: Is the dt value also lower after playing??

My experience:
I use the SW Tension advisor to calculate tensions for every racquet in order to get a certain stiffness. Most of the time the result will be 3 to 6 DT points higher directly after stringing than what I aimed at. The reason for this is probably that SW built in some safety margin because it is much worse when you end too low than a little too high.

I do not have a good comparison between using the tool and not using it, I use the new tools for all racquets.
The difference in SBS between different strings is huge, when you string a syn gut you can go down in tension more than one category (3 kg/cm) and with a bad poly you end up at the stiffness that you calculated with.

So I compensate for the type of string from the calculated values.

Thanks for these posts. Very interesting.

Irvin
08-18-2010, 11:01 AM
Hi guys,
I know that being able to weave fast is a quality of an experienced stringer, and all these tips are certainly very useful.

However it is also the proud of a craftsman to have the latest tools that are available.

So once you are fed up with weaving and especially those stiff monos, invest in these tools.
It is easier, faster and better for the string and .....for your back.

Just have a look at this guy, I do not think many stringers can push and pull the string through (without friction) as fast as he can.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoktfpQE4C0

What do you think??

I may be not so fast but much faster than without the tools, use them many years already.
Because the level of concentration can be lower, it seems easier to do more stringjobs after each other.

I looked at the video and it took the string 20 seconds to weave one cross. Crom 1:40 to 2:00 in the video. I can weve my crosses faster then 20 seconds so why do I need a tool that takes time to set up and take off?

Practice, practice, practice that is all it takes.

Irvin

struggle
08-18-2010, 12:35 PM
neat tool.

unnecessary.

like using a chainsaw and not being able to file the chain.

Irvin
08-20-2010, 06:17 AM
Here is a little trick to speed up your cross weaving. Once you have enough practice you can usually do it just as fast with no gimmicks. But it is going to take a lot of practice to beat this method.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Mr10sStringer#p/u/0/VM_SuQgirr8&fmt=18

Irvin

MAX PLY
08-20-2010, 06:23 AM
^^^
Now THAT is pretty neat--in 35+ years of playing and stringing, I have never seen that one before--not even in a USRSA publication. Thanks for sharing that one.

Irvin
08-20-2010, 06:28 AM
Thanks, just remember Cheaters never win but they are hard to beat.

Irvin

drakulie
08-20-2010, 06:35 AM
^^^Excellent, EXCELLENT TIP. THANKS FOR SHARING. Like Max, I have never seen that before.

MAX PLY
08-20-2010, 06:36 AM
OK--not sure of the relevance of your reference to cheaters, however?

rich s
08-20-2010, 06:43 AM
Here is a little trick to speed up your cross weaving. Once you have enough practice you can usually do it just as fast with no gimmicks. But it is going to take a lot of practice to beat this method.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Mr10sStringer#p/u/0/VM_SuQgirr8&fmt=18

Irvin

^^^
Now THAT is pretty neat--in 35+ years of playing and stringing, I have never seen that one before--not even in a USRSA publication. Thanks for sharing that one.

That's ingenius.....

Could you put a second set of looped strings woven opposite the first set of looped strings immediately adjacent to each other and just pull both sets back and forth with the tennis string thru the loop of the appropriate set of looped strings?

I might try this to see if it works.....

Irvin
08-20-2010, 06:48 AM
^^ Just saying that I was cheating when I was running the crosses with this method. The way I look at it it's sort of like using a calculator on a math test. What good does it do you? No matter how much faster this is I think I can do the racket just about as fast pushing it with my fingers but until you get to that point it can save you some time.

I used a cotton string because that is what I had but I think a braided nylon string will work better. I would not use something like tennis string as that would have too much friction and could burn the string.

Irvin

MAX PLY
08-20-2010, 06:52 AM
^^
I see. I guess I didn't consider it cheating. Definitiely cotton or nylon--something low friction. Still very cool.

MAX PLY
08-20-2010, 06:56 AM
That's ingenius.....

Could you put a second set of looped strings woven opposite the first set of looped strings immediately adjacent to each other and just pull both sets back and forth with the tennis string thru the loop of the appropriate set of looped strings?

I might try this to see if it works.....

I suspect the reason it only works in one direction is if you used two, the second helper string would block the actual racquet strings from being in position.

Irvin
08-20-2010, 07:24 AM
I suspect the reason it only works in one direction is if you used two, the second helper string would block the actual racquet strings from being in position.

Each cross is interlaced opposite the one above it. You can move a string past another string that is opposite.

But I did notice one thing when I was weaving the cotton string in the mains. It was very easy to weave and pull it across. Maybe you could just use one small loop of string and weave it, put the tennis string in and pull it across. There is a lot of wasted effort though.

Irvin

rich s
08-20-2010, 12:40 PM
I suspect the reason it only works in one direction is if you used two, the second helper string would block the actual racquet strings from being in position.

I think if you were to have them side by side and keep the racquet string above them both you wouldn't have a problem because the live end of the tennis string you are weaving could be cleared of both after you weave and before you thread it thru the grommet.....

I could be wrong.... but I'm gonna give it a try.....

Maybe Irwin can come over and video me if it works.... :)

rich s
08-20-2010, 12:42 PM
^^
I see. I guess I didn't consider it cheating. Definitiely cotton or nylon--something low friction. Still very cool.


would a heavy mercerized cotton thread that you use for buttons work or do you think it my cut the tennis strings?

Irvin
08-20-2010, 02:10 PM
would a heavy mercerized cotton thread that you use for buttons work or do you think it my cut the tennis strings?

I am not sure what a mercerized thread is but you could try it. I tried some nylon twised twine and it works great. After four rackets though it is pretty well separated so you have to make another.

Irvin

Irvin
08-20-2010, 02:11 PM
I think if you were to have them side by side and keep the racquet string above them both you wouldn't have a problem because the live end of the tennis string you are weaving could be cleared of both after you weave and before you thread it thru the grommet.....

I could be wrong.... but I'm gonna give it a try.....

Maybe Irwin can come over and video me if it works.... :)

I won't need to come over it will not work. You will see why.

Irvin

rich s
08-20-2010, 04:55 PM
I won't need to come over it will not work. You will see why.

Irvin

have you tried it already? what happens?

I might have to do it just to do it.....

Irvin
08-20-2010, 05:31 PM
have you tried it already? what happens?

I might have to do it just to do it.....

No I have not tried it. It is going to be hard to explain but imagine a string that has been interlaced across the mains. Now you weave another in the opposite pattern. It is impossible to get one string past the other.

Irvin

rich s
08-20-2010, 05:54 PM
No I have not tried it. It is going to be hard to explain but imagine a string that has been interlaced across the mains. Now you weave another in the opposite pattern. It is impossible to get one string past the other.

Irvin

I just tried it..... the cotton strings for the "opposite direction weave" gets trapped between the tennis string you just wove and the previous woven tennis string....

Irvin
08-20-2010, 05:56 PM
^^ Yes but I bet you a dollar to a donut that most people don't understand that. Most are just going to have to see it for themselves just like you did. Thanks for trying.

Irvin