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Tennis_Crazed
08-10-2010, 04:55 PM
All my fellow stringers out there....how fast do you string?

I'm sure everyone can cut minutes off their time if they're 100% focused on going for the world record speed of stringing, but just wanted to know on average, what your stringing time would be...

Please don't exaggerate! thank you!!!!

drakulie
08-10-2010, 05:30 PM
If you are just talking about "stringing" in the sense of just putting the strings on an already mounted frame,,,,, then I'd say I average easily below 15 minutes.

However, you need to take into account what type of frame and strings are being put it. Obviously on a microgel prestige mid (which is capped), and putting on poly or full natural gut, then the time would go up.

On a more opened patterned frame, with an easier string to handle, the time would go way down.

Easiest frame I have strung, that I could remember was a POG Mid with synthetic string, and it was most likely well under 10 minutes.

coyfish
08-10-2010, 07:17 PM
A whole racquet in 10 minutes . . . hmmm

chaddles
08-10-2010, 08:57 PM
No exaggeration there..................

Anyway, we have a Babolat Sensor and Wilson Baiardo - I reckon the average time for me is around the 20 minute mark, but I do string everyday. I spent about 40 mins on a f'in Prince Approach 90 the other day that had half the grommets cracked, so I had to use tubing which took a bit of extra time.

autumn_leaf
08-10-2010, 09:09 PM
i string on a gamma 602 fc (dropweight machine). i picked 45 min cause i usually string syn. gut. prolly around 60 min for poly. the time includes stringing and all the setup for the racquet (adjusting mounting, cutting string, looking up string pattern on klipper)

vndesu
08-10-2010, 10:25 PM
depending on a racket, but roughly 30 mins on my gamma x5 stringer.

aimr75
08-10-2010, 10:44 PM
i usually string on average between 20-25 minutes

THESEXPISTOL
08-10-2010, 10:54 PM
40mins in my dropweight

Rabbit
08-11-2010, 04:01 AM
I average around 20 minutes on a Neos with a Wise tension head. The Wise does speed things up considerably

jmverdugo
08-11-2010, 04:17 AM
I timed my self the other day, on a dropweight machine, with the racquet mounted and the first piece of string cut it took me 20 minutes. It was Wilson hiperhammer 6.2 with synthetic gut.

diredesire
08-11-2010, 10:09 AM
You need to establish benchmark "rules." AKA are we talking about installing strings ONLY? (pre mounted, strings removed) or the full job?

I can average <20 minutes for full jobs (remove string, mount, string, straighten, remove frame) with no issues, but I've strung for several years for a D1 college team. Piles of 12-20 racquets that are due the next day helps speed tremendously ;)

My record is 10:52 on a Prince Diablo OS with Prince Lightning (does not include removing string, includes mounting to straightening). I imagine I can go faster than that (for instance on a POG Mid), but I don't really go for speed runs very often. There comes a point where you're happy with your speed ;)

jazar
08-11-2010, 10:23 AM
I average about 17 minutes, from removing the strings to removing the frame from the machine.

I did a speed run today and broke my record, dropping it down to 9:35 on a POG mid in poly. That was actual stringing time though and didnt include cutting the old strings

vandre
08-11-2010, 10:42 AM
well, my current time (cutting out the old stuff, prestretching [if i'm using syn gut or a nonpoly which i usually am], mounting the frame, string the mains and crosses) is about 60-70 min. on a 6 pt dropweight machine. i'm just stringing for my wife and i so speed isn't a big deal to me and i do it so infrequently it seems like sometimes i'm relearning things everytime i do it.

do i get the snail award???

pvaudio
08-11-2010, 11:46 AM
I usually average about 20-25mins on my own frames or ones I'm familiar with, about 25-35 on ones I've never done before. Done on SP Aria.

fuzzyballs
08-11-2010, 06:10 PM
alittle under an hour here on a X2... my ADD kicks in and the TV is usually on!

drakulie
08-11-2010, 07:07 PM
A whole racquet in 10 minutes . . . hmmm

Yeah lol he is full of crap. I don't understand why people lie. Defeats the purpose of the poll.


Please read what I actually wrote, and more importantly, try to comprehend it. I said, "Easiest frame I have strung, that I could remember was a POG Mid with synthetic string, and it was most likely well under 10 minutes."

This means, that as far as I know, it was under 10 minutes. It doesn't mean *IT WAS* under 10 minutes. I don't sit there and time myself every time I string a frame. The particular instance I was talking about was one time stringing at a tournament, and stringing a POG Mid. All I remember is that it was very fast, and someone there told me that they couldn't believe I had just strung the frame in 10 minutes.

One more thing, I don't consider myself a professional stringer, nor do I have the advantage of stringing 15+ frames a day at a tennis shop, 5 days a week, which equals out to hundreds of frames a month. Obviously, these type of stringers have an immense amount of practice getting into rythms, habits, and develop extremely smooth and fast weaving, which I don't. That said, I was still able to string a POG Mid in 10 minute and 40 seconds.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvx7_o7nClQ



Now for the others who are interested. In string speed contests,

they don't bother putting the string around a diablo, as I did
they don't fan the string as I did, rather just pull it thru as fast as they can,
they don't straigthen strings as the tension head pulls, as I did
and they most likely have the tension head speed set at fast ( I had mine on medium).

if I were to have done what they do in string speed contests, my time would have surely been under 10 minutes. And NO, I'm not a Professional stringer.

David123
08-11-2010, 09:35 PM
Wow Drak, you string very quickly :P

drakulie
08-11-2010, 09:51 PM
Wow Drak, you string very quickly :P


actually, **FAST** is guys at the string speed contest who have to, if memory serves, mount, take strings out of the packet, string, and then dismount the frame. Those guys weaving technique and how smoth they are is sick. I believe the winner a few years ago did it in about 8 and a half minutes.

(don't burn me at the stake if I'm off on the time, Coyfish and others)

BUt like I said, they also don't fan, put string around diablo, and most-likely have the machine set on fast pulls (although I'm not sure). I'm also unsure what the tension is set at, which would obviously make a difference as a lower tension would mean the tension head is reaching tension faster. I set mine at 55.

rich s
08-12-2010, 04:17 AM
I upgraded from my 602FC w/wise to a 6004 w/wise last week.... my second stick took me 23 minutes..... as opposed to 35+ minutes...

PimpMyGame
08-12-2010, 04:28 AM
45 minutes with a beer, radio on and maybe a chat with one of the kids if they venture into my shed. Can do it in 30 minutes but I'm never in a hurry, so that's why it takes 45 minutes.

origmarm
08-12-2010, 04:38 AM
45 or so on a dropweight. 30 or so on a crank/electric. I'm including everything here i.e. cutting out to taking the racquet off. I'm also assuming people are not "cheating" here i.e double pulls etc... I can't imagine getting it under 20 or so and doing a quality job, but then I'm not a pro stringer...

EDIT: Racquet is almost always a MGPMP with full poly. Reckon I can take 5m off using another string maybe...

schap02
08-12-2010, 05:46 AM
If I'm working really quickly I can probably do one in about 20min including cutting the string.

I watched a stringing competition on the tennis channel a few years back and some of the best times were around 10min. This was on a 16x18 k95. These were professional stringers and the winner got a chance to string at the US open. I think the world record is right under 9 min so I'm going to call ******** on drak saying he could do well under 10 min unless he happens to be the world record holder. Anything under 12-15min is probably approaching what a pro stringer can do.


Drak's a good guy, give it a rest already...
The only stringing competition I have seen was a basic ProStaff frame 16 x 18 pattern - Full 16G textured poly....stringer couldn't touch racquet until the timer started - mounting - cutting strings - ect...fastest time was like 9:30 or something close to that - Anyways - I believe what Drak was referring to in his stringing time was simply installing the strings, not including all the mounting dismounting ect...

schap02
08-12-2010, 05:47 AM
I upgraded from my 602FC w/wise to a 6004 w/wise last week.... my second stick took me 23 minutes..... as opposed to 35+ minutes...


Thoroughly disappointed in your switch between stringers...
How do you like the Wise on the 6004 compared to our other set-up...?

How often do you clean your clamps on the Gamma, my clamps are starting to give me fits, might be time to change the springs or something?

MAX PLY
08-12-2010, 06:06 AM
In Drak's defense, he did mention that the frame was a POG Mid--only 14 mains if I recall correctly and no shared holes. Probably the easiest frame in the history of the game to string. In my younger days, I used to work as a stringer for a mail order tennis discounter (like a TW only far more primative). In those days, POG overs and mids were very popular and we would zoom through them pretty quickly when stringing with nylon or some other synthetic -4 or 5 per hour (and I would add, we (there were 5 stringers) would divy up the frames so that a stringer would do several of the same frame so as not to have to adjust the machine (Ektelon Fs, if I recall correctly) as much). Other frames like Pro Staffs, 200gs, and F200s took a bit longer. Likewise, gut or other softer strings took a bit longer.

These days, I don't string for speed and pretty much only string my own frames (BLX 95s)--using NXT or gut--usually takes me 20 minutes or so (but I have had 35 years or so of practicing my weaving and arthritis has not yet set in (in my hands at least).

esgee48
08-12-2010, 07:50 AM
Just stringing my own racquets with syn gut, about 30 mins on a dropweight. The whole deal from checking grommets, yada, yada, to dismount, add another 10 minutes. Of course, if I'm watching TV and having a beer while stringing, add another 30 minutes.

SirGounder
08-12-2010, 08:17 AM
45 minutes is my average - cutting, measuring, mounting, etc.

rich s
08-12-2010, 08:17 AM
Thoroughly disappointed in your switch between stringers...
How do you like the Wise on the 6004 compared to our other set-up...?

How often do you clean your clamps on the Gamma, my clamps are starting to give me fits, might be time to change the springs or something?

Sorry to disappoint.... you'll understand when you get your Star 5. ;)

I ordered the Wise Gamma adapter when I ordered the machine. It sets up a straight pull just like that on the 602FC/Wise with our adapter.... no complaints at all.

The machine works great..... It has the smaller 4 tooth clamps, spring bases and self centering mounts....it's like upgrading from a Chevy to a Cadillac....Still learning the nuances of the machine..... I'm sure I will be able to maintain the sub 25 minute string jobs as I get even more familiar with it....

What's giving you fits about the 602FC clamps? Mine were the red ones, I think you have the black ones. I would clean them occasionally with tooth brush and alcohol..... and adjust them tight enough to hold a multi while trying to minimize ghosting, but never any problems.....

RogerRacket111
08-12-2010, 08:24 AM
Why the need for speed? I like to get the job done right. I still average about an hour. Each pull and clamp matters for a quality job. I only string my own racket though.

There should be a measure for quality also rather than just speed.

diredesire
08-12-2010, 08:44 AM
If I'm working really quickly I can probably do one in about 20min including cutting the string.

I watched a stringing competition on the tennis channel a few years back and some of the best times were around 10min. This was on a 16x18 k95. These were professional stringers and the winner got a chance to string at the US open. I think the world record is right under 9 min so I'm going to call ******** on drak saying he could do well under 10 min unless he happens to be the world record holder. Anything under 12-15min is probably approaching what a pro stringer can do.
Wasn't the absolute fastest racquet done <8 minutes? I'm not positive as to what that includes.

Also consider the POG Mid vs a standard frame, speed contests are going to have standardized frames, the Wilson speed contest (IIRC in 2007) used 16x18 6.1s, drak is stringing a 14x18, not only is it less mains to weave, it's also less mains to weave across, speeding up the crosses. The POG Mid is ridiculously easy to string. Couple that with a soft synthetic, I could see <10 minutes relatively easily, especially if not including cutting/mounting/decoiling.

onehandbh
08-12-2010, 09:22 AM
I think the fastest I did was a little under 20 minutes.
usually closer to 30 minutes.

Drak, just saw your video. How do weave so fast? Your
fingers must have sandpaper-like traction at the tips.

rich s
08-12-2010, 12:27 PM
I think the fastest I did was a little under 20 minutes.
usually closer to 30 minutes.

Drak, just saw your video. How do weave so fast? Your
fingers must have sandpaper-like traction at the tips.

When you weave one ahead the previous cross separates the strings so that it is extremely easier to weave as Drak demonstrates......

AR15
08-12-2010, 12:39 PM
I average 30 minutes,

AND I average 50 minutes.:???:

Lakers4Life
08-12-2010, 01:06 PM
I upgraded from my 602FC w/wise to a 6004 w/wise last week.... my second stick took me 23 minutes..... as opposed to 35+ minutes...

I'm curious why did it take longer on the older machine, when basically they are the same setup. But after reading you reply to schap it was because you had the older 602FC clamps.

I average about 30 mins, removing old string, cleaning, mounting, measuring, stringing (20 mins) and straightening. Though when I get mutiple rackets that are the same model, it's much faster stringing.

Lakers4Life
08-12-2010, 01:10 PM
Wasn't the absolute fastest racquet done <8 minutes? I'm not positive as to what that includes.

Also consider the POG Mid vs a standard frame, speed contests are going to have standardized frames, the Wilson speed contest (IIRC in 2007) used 16x18 6.1s, drak is stringing a 14x18, not only is it less mains to weave, it's also less mains to weave across, speeding up the crosses. The POG Mid is ridiculously easy to string. Couple that with a soft synthetic, I could see <10 minutes relatively easily, especially if not including cutting/mounting/decoiling.

I strung a Head iS.12 in about 10 mins while taking my time. I probably could of strung it faster, if I were in a hurry. It's got a wide 14x 18 pattern.

tennisman917
08-12-2010, 02:18 PM
ive done a wilson nblade 98 18x20 pattern in 20 mins on the gamma x-2 just now

star 5 15
08-12-2010, 03:00 PM
i string mainly my own personal racquets and usually do around 17-18 minutes on the average racquet like a pure drive or something. My racquets are the Pure Storm LTD's 18x20 pattern strung with alu rough at 26kg. On my racquets when I'm really trying to shell them out I usually average about 22-23 minutes with mounting uncoiling and everything except cutting strings out and checking grommets. The fastest frame I've timed was a POG mid strung wtih synthetic at like 55. It was about two years ago and I think it was about 10 minutes 45 seconds. That was with the racquet mounted and the string cut from the reel with it on the ground.
And BTW my racquets are the biggest pain in the @ss of anything i've ever strung with my setup the way it is. yes i think it tops lux original rough in a prestige mid capped.

mikeler
08-12-2010, 03:02 PM
I'd be curious of my time on a high end machine. Takes me about a minute per string after the racket is mounted and string lengths are cut.

coachrick
08-12-2010, 03:07 PM
I'll chime in...PG 90, PSG original 16, Prince P200 machine(yuck!), frame mounted, string unpackaged but not uncoiled,>>> tie-offs cut and strings straightened= 8 minutes-forty seconds. Didn't know we were going for time until I was about to start. Got a 'challenge' and took off. Interestingly, there were a number of 'idiosyncratic' movements I make that waste time...old habits die hard! Also, the P200 was a dinosaur the day it was introduced...some of the worst clamps in history.

No need to be sloppy to string quickly...just cut out the wasted movements. I would 'never' sacrifice quality for speed. More time does not necessarily mean higher quality.

I doubt I string anything in much under 20 minutes, now. Those days are behind me! ;)

Lakers4Life
08-12-2010, 03:23 PM
I'd be curious of my time on a high end machine. Takes me about a minute per string after the racket is mounted and string lengths are cut.

That's about 35 mins (+/- 5 mins).

rich s
08-12-2010, 03:31 PM
I'm curious why did it take longer on the older machine, when basically they are the same setup. But after reading you reply to schap it was because you had the older 602FC clamps.

I average about 30 mins, removing old string, cleaning, mounting, measuring, stringing (20 mins) and straightening. Though when I get mutiple rackets that are the same model, it's much faster stringing.

With the self centering mounts, a single knob to tighten both arms on each mount, smoother, quicker action clamps that are smaller and easier to fit between strings and mounts, quick action bases and bearing mounted turntable everything about the 6004 is easier and quicker......

By far the greatest time savings is the quick action clamp bases vs the large wing nut clamp bases, the second greatest time saver is the self-centering mounting system vs individually moving and tightening each mount base then the center supports and each of the four arms/supports.

I'm not easily impressed and I realize it isn't a STAR 5, but this thing ROCKS.....

Lakers4Life
08-12-2010, 03:50 PM
With the self centering mounts, a single knob to tighten both arms on each mount, smoother, quicker action clamps that are smaller and easier to fit between strings and mounts, quick action bases and bearing mounted turntable everything about the 6004 is easier and quicker......

By far the greatest time savings is the quick action clamp bases vs the large wing nut clamp bases, the second greatest time saver is the self-centering mounting system vs individually moving and tightening each mount base then the center supports and each of the four arms/supports.

I'm not easily impressed and I realize it isn't a STAR 5, but this thing ROCKS.....

I have the same setup, and it's comparable to a Star 5. Though if you think about it a Star 5 is an entry level Babolat machine. I'd rather have a Prince 6000 for the price. I'm curious, did Babolat ever make a manual machine?

I do have an Issue with mounting Babolat Aero Pro Drive (et. al) racket on my 2-point mounts at the yoke.

rich s
08-12-2010, 04:05 PM
I have the same setup, and it's comparable to a Star 5. Though if you think about it a Star 5 is an entry level Babolat machine. I'd rather have a Prince 6000 for the price. I'm curious, did Babolat ever make a manual machine?

I do have an Issue with mounting Babolat Aero Pro Drive (et. al) racket on my 2-point mounts at the yoke.

Don't know if Bab ever made a crank....

I got the SC 6 point for the reason you describe with the APD..... I was concerned about mounting issues with frames that have unique shapes

drakulie
08-12-2010, 06:45 PM
Drak's a good guy, give it a rest already...
The only stringing competition I have seen was a basic ProStaff frame 16 x 18 pattern - Full 16G textured poly....stringer couldn't touch racquet until the timer started - mounting - cutting strings - ect...fastest time was like 9:30 or something close to that - Anyways - I believe what Drak was referring to in his stringing time was simply installing the strings, not including all the mounting dismounting ect...

In Drak's defense, he did mention that the frame was a POG Mid--only 14 mains if I recall correctly and no shared holes. Probably the easiest frame in the history of the game to string. In my younger days, I used to work as a stringer for a mail order tennis discounter (like a TW only far more primative). In those days, POG overs and mids were very popular and we would zoom through them pretty quickly when stringing with nylon or some other synthetic -4 or 5 per hour (and I would add, we (there were 5 stringers) would divy up the frames so that a stringer would do several of the same frame so as not to have to adjust the machine (Ektelon Fs, if I recall correctly) as much). Other frames like Pro Staffs, 200gs, and F200s took a bit longer. Likewise, gut or other softer strings took a bit longer.

These days, I don't string for speed and pretty much only string my own frames (BLX 95s)--using NXT or gut--usually takes me 20 minutes or so (but I have had 35 years or so of practicing my weaving and arthritis has not yet set in (in my hands at least).

Thanks guys. :)


I think the fastest I did was a little under 20 minutes.
usually closer to 30 minutes.

Drak, just saw your video. How do weave so fast? Your
fingers must have sandpaper-like traction at the tips.

I actually wish I was faster/smoother. But as I said, I don't string 15 racuets a day, so it is hard to improve on.

During tournaments however, I do find that I get faster as the day goes on. Especially when I get to string 2 or 3 of the same frames back to back. In the video, I was using some crappy string I had laying around (don't even know what it was) and it was slick, so it was actaully hard to get a good grip on it, as you could see in the video a few times.

I'll chime in...PG 90, PSG original 16, Prince P200 machine(yuck!), frame mounted, string unpackaged but not uncoiled,>>> tie-offs cut and strings straightened= 8 minutes-forty seconds. Didn't know we were going for time until I was about to start. Got a 'challenge' and took off. Interestingly, there were a number of 'idiosyncratic' movements I make that waste time...old habits die hard! Also, the P200 was a dinosaur the day it was introduced...some of the worst clamps in history.

No need to be sloppy to string quickly...just cut out the wasted movements. I would 'never' sacrifice quality for speed. More time does not necessarily mean higher quality.

I doubt I string anything in much under 20 minutes, now. Those days are behind me! ;)

Great post.

These "wasted movements" you speak of, are little things that make pro stringers so fast. They just don't have hardly any wasted movements. They have learned over the years to limit and/or get rid of unecessary "steps" while one is stringing.

Rabbit
08-13-2010, 07:35 AM
Well hell, let me add my two cents on the Prince Graphite Mid. I owned some for a time and sold them to a friend of mine who I also string for.

He plays PSG Original at 65. These are the absolute easiest and fastest racquets to string and I can get one done in under 20 minutes. I've never timed myself, but I would guess my best time would be in the 17 minute range.

So, in the immortal words of Tonto "Drak no lie"

mtommer
08-13-2010, 09:33 AM
Man, you guys who can string in 30 min...I'm jealous. I still haven't gotten my time down below a couple of hours. I do use a Klippermate and I find the majority of time I'm trying to get the drop bar to settle and stop at level (or close to it per the 1 1/2 inch instruction).

Fugazi
08-13-2010, 11:58 AM
I've done it a few times in about 15 minutes once upon a time, in my prime... (no shortcuts)

RogerRacket111
08-13-2010, 12:49 PM
I'm just trying to understand why the need for speed?

->Is it because you guys are pros and can make more money by stringing more?
->Or you can get out the door and play some tennis?
->Just plain I'm faster than you like doing a puzzle

I string only for myself and find it to be a relaxing activity that I want to take time and do it right.

onehandbh
08-13-2010, 01:05 PM
^^^ I don't try to string as fast as I can, but I have a busy life
so prefer to spend a minimal amount of time stringing.

mtommer
08-13-2010, 01:08 PM
I'm just trying to understand why the need for speed?

->Or you can get out the door and play some tennis?

-Bingo. I personally find stringing an inconvenience. I will say also that those guys that are "fast" ARE doing the job right.

pvaudio
08-13-2010, 01:13 PM
Was watching a Top Gear stringing up my stick with NRG2 18 and ended up breaking two sets because I was pulling the string too fast. I started the timer before mounting and after unstringing and remeasuring out three sets for the mains, I ended up finishing in 39 mins, so I'd say that my estimate of 25mins with non-fragile string is accurate.

drakulie
08-13-2010, 01:55 PM
Well hell, let me add my two cents on the Prince Graphite Mid. I owned some for a time and sold them to a friend of mine who I also string for.

He plays PSG Original at 65. These are the absolute easiest and fastest racquets to string and I can get one done in under 20 minutes. I've never timed myself, but I would guess my best time would be in the 17 minute range.

So, in the immortal words of Tonto "Drak no lie"


lol, "Lone Ranger".

I was actually thinking I would have strung it faster on the Neos. I think I could of, just because of the pull on the crank being faster, and release. Also, the damn mounting arms not being in the way.

That said, I have been stringing on the 5000 last few weeks. Damn I love that machine. Makes me want to buy the 1500 and add a wise to it. I miss the fast mounting of those machines, and fact there is nothing in your way when doing crosses.


I'm just trying to understand why the need for speed?

->Is it because you guys are pros and can make more money by stringing more?
->Or you can get out the door and play some tennis?
->Just plain I'm faster than you like doing a puzzle

I string only for myself and find it to be a relaxing activity that I want to take time and do it right.

RogerRacket, the "need for speed" could vary. When one is working at a shop and they are being paid per racquet, obviously they will want to finish them quicker.

At tournaments, it's almost a must that one get the racquet strung and into the players hand as quickly as possible. In my case, I string at all the nationals here at the club. many times, during a tournament, I'll have a player come up to me and say, "I'm going on in 30 minutes. Could you string the frame for me?" Of course, I'll have to finish the frame I'm working on very quickly, then turn around and do that one as fast as I can, without doing a crappy job.

Just a few examples.

When I'm at home stringing for customers, I obviously take more time as there is not a mad rush, but I still get them done quickly.

Rabbit
08-14-2010, 02:44 PM
After one learns to string, about the only thing to improve is your time.

pvaudio
08-14-2010, 10:19 PM
After one learns to string, about the only thing to improve is your time.
I'd like to either edit this or disagree with it entirely: after one learns to string PROPERLY, the only thing to improve is the time. Many people know how to string a racquet because it isn't very difficult, but the thing that separates the best stringers from amateurs like most on here who string for themselves is the level of consistency that they have when going from frame to frame, string type to string type, machine to machine and most importantly, client to client. It's the best stringers out there who can tailor the stringjob exactly to what the player asks for and can do that on any machine anywhere in the world.

Technatic
08-14-2010, 10:41 PM
I'm curious, did Babolat ever make a manual machine?


Babolat did not make cranks they did made dropweights but that must be 20 years ago. I will see if I can find pictures in my archive.

Technatic
08-14-2010, 11:11 PM
Hereby the Babolat dropweight:

http://a.imageshack.us/img819/103/babolatdropweightkl.jpg

Rabbit
08-15-2010, 08:28 AM
I'd like to either edit this or disagree with it entirely: after one learns to string PROPERLY, the only thing to improve is the time. Many people know how to string a racquet because it isn't very difficult, but the thing that separates the best stringers from amateurs like most on here who string for themselves is the level of consistency that they have when going from frame to frame, string type to string type, machine to machine and most importantly, client to client. It's the best stringers out there who can tailor the stringjob exactly to what the player asks for and can do that on any machine anywhere in the world.

I didn't feel a qualification was necessary, but OK.

coachrick
08-15-2010, 08:43 AM
Hereby the Babolat dropweight:

http://a.imageshack.us/img819/103/babolatdropweightkl.jpg

Well, HUSH my mouth! Never saw such an animal! Do we know when this was introduced? You mentioned 20 years and it is the logo used in the '80s; but, I repped them in '84 and didn't know anything about a machine from BMW.(still have my tool kit, though)

drakulie
08-15-2010, 02:14 PM
Wow :shock: Thanks for the photo, Technatic! Great stuff.


back on topic, here is a video of the speed stringing contest from a few years ago:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8679137346952586060&ei=InqoS6GPEtqN-AbczrHxCg&q=fastest+racket+stringer+&view=3#

dk03
08-15-2010, 07:48 PM
i can do any babolat racquet or a 16x19/20 pattern in about 13-14 mins. if its full poly it takes me about 17 mins. my slowest is 18x20 full poly which takes me around 20 mins. also i almost always string 2 piece. right now i string at a country club pro shop on a prince neos 1000 and a gamma 5003 at home and stringing on the neos takes me way less time than the gamma

Hankenstein
08-16-2010, 04:44 AM
I string on a Neos 1000 with a wise tension head and a normal Wilson 6.1 18 * 20 with signum poly takes about 15 minutes with mounting, cutting strings and string the racket.

I once strung a POG 14 mains with a synth gut on about 11 minutes with a neos 1000 crank. That was 7 years ago though.

But, itīs more important to take your time and donīt rush through the stringing just to cut time. When you have strung rackets every day for 10 years, the speed will come naturally.

origmarm
08-16-2010, 06:02 AM
I do use a Klippermate and I find the majority of time I'm trying to get the drop bar to settle and stop at level (or close to it per the 1 1/2 inch instruction).

For me this is the Achilles heel of the Klippermate. I tend to recommend the SP Swing purely on the basis of the clutch for this reason. That and the clamps I think are better than Gamma's clamps for the X-2.

Ash_Smith
08-16-2010, 06:14 AM
It worries me a little that recently there's been alot of threads on here about time taken to string. For all new stringers reading this - please ignore our stories of 15-20 minute stringjobs! Quality of service is most important by a country mile, speed only matters if you put yourself in a situation like tournament stringing - and even then if the quality suffers you won't be around long!

Please don't fall into the trap of trying to be fast - try to be good, very good! Your customers will remember the quality service you gave them, not the fact that you did their racquet in 15 minutes!

Sorry to pontificate!

Ash

BobFL
08-16-2010, 07:19 AM
Man, you guys who can string in 30 min...I'm jealous. I still haven't gotten my time down below a couple of hours. I do use a Klippermate and I find the majority of time I'm trying to get the drop bar to settle and stop at level (or close to it per the 1 1/2 inch instruction).

Don't waste your time. It is really not important if the drop bar is perfectly parallel to the ground. Up to +/- 10 degrees is perfectly OK...

onehandbh
08-16-2010, 09:45 AM
First time stringing a babolat aeropro ???. 16x19.
30 min 09 seconds. Lux big banger.
using stringway ml90. Tried to do a good job. (for friend's
raq)

RogerRacket111
08-16-2010, 09:52 AM
I'm just trying to understand why the need for speed?

->Is it because you guys are pros and can make more money by stringing more?
->Or you can get out the door and play some tennis?
->Just plain I'm faster than you like doing a puzzle

I string only for myself and find it to be a relaxing activity that I want to take time and do it right.

I totally get what you guys are saying I normally string for myself and a close relative asked me to do his. It felt like such a chore. I wish I could have strung it in 15mins. And I ended up breaking the horizontal string one time. The pull through the shared hole was a pain in a**.

drakulie
08-16-2010, 09:58 AM
I totally get what you guys are saying I normally string for myself and a close relative asked me to do his. It felt like such a chore. I wish I could have strung it in 15mins. And I ended up breaking the horizontal string one time. The pull through the shared hole was a pain in a**.


Here is a great article by, Tim Strawn .


Speedy?

December 29, 2009

Is a 15-minute quality string job possible?

I recently read a post where the author was quite disenchanted with “pro” stringers because they felt that the quality of the string job was sacrificed in the name of speed. Therefore their advice was to buy an inexpensive stringing machine and do your own string jobs. It’s quite possible there are stringers out there who fall into this category and if that’s the case, I suspect that it wouldn’t take long to weed them out. However, just because these people may exist, I think it’s unfair to simply discount the idea that because one can string fast that the finished product is inferior. I would take issue with the author of the post that this is reason enough for everyone to simply buy their own machine and string for themselves. Hopefully the following information will be helpful.
First and foremost, speed is rarely, if at all, a factor for a club, shop, or home stringer. This is important to remember because this piece of information seems to always be lost when this subject is addressed. Most of the stringers mentioned above will not be stringing in situations that demand speed as a prerequisite. With this in mind, let’s first look at some information that might be helpful when choosing someone to string your racquet.
Integrity is the true benchmark of a good stringer, just as it is in all things when dealing with people. There are several issues addressed when a racquet is serviced and if you can’t trust the stringer to give it to you straight, how comfortable are you going to be turning over your favorite racquet to them for service? Assessing this particular aspect of their character will take some patience on your behalf so give them the benefit of the doubt in the beginning and see what they can do. This is the only way you’ll find out it they’re the right person for the job. Look for pricing discrepancies, quality of work, and the questions they ask, especially if this is the first time you’ve worked with them. Do they go the extra mile to see that you’re satisfied with their services? Do they guarantee their work? If you’re attentive, it won’t take long to spot a true craftsman and this is the person you’re looking for!
The commitment a stringer has to their craft is paramount to the end result that most of us expect and others will demand. This will be obvious through a simple conversation with a competent stringer because it will stick out like a sore thumb. I’m not talking about the stringing geek who drives you crazy with details that impress only those folks with no knowledge of stringing whatsoever. A competent stringer is direct and to the point and their answers come from experience. They won’t be easily backed into a corner because their knowledge of their craft will provide the confidence required to handle any situation. In short, they are committed to the absolute highest standard when it comes to racquet service and nothing short of that standard is acceptable to them. They view anything less as a direct reflection on their personal ability to deliver a professional string job.
The loyalty they have to their client base will be obvious the longer you work with that person. If your string breaks prematurely they will replace it within reason and do everything possible to make sure you’re satisfied. The reasons are many, but consider this. A good reliable stringer takes pride in his/her work. They’re smart enough to realize that one unhappy customer will relate their experience to 20 people, while good consistent service will usually get far less publicity. This is basic human nature. We tend to moan and groan to everyone when we’re mad, but tend to take the good things in life for granted and say little to anyone else about it. It’s one of those weird things where people view themselves as more of an authority when they’re ripping you to shreds, but if they think they’ve found a good thing, they want to keep it to themselves; therefore you get less free exposure from that person for a job well done. Go figure!
The speed at which your string job is completed is of no importance with the exception of two situations. If you’re paying a premium for “one-hour” service then the stringer obviously must have the ability to turn it around within that time frame. The other situation relates to tour stringers as mentioned above. In particular, Grand Slam events and other tournaments where the work load in the first few days can be absolutely astounding. The same applies for other tournaments as well but the pace tends to ease up sooner. It’s not uncommon for a team at a Slam to be doing over 200 racquets a day in the early going, which means most team members are doing a minimum of 25-30 racquets per day if not more. In some cases these tournaments run a night crew as well to do the remaining racquets left from the day crew. Speed is often equated with ability, when in fact speed is far down the list on a competent stringers resume. However, if you place yourself in the line of fire by taking on the responsibilities of high level tournament stringing such as a Grand Slam, it’s highly recommended that you have a third or fourth gear to shift to when the situation calls for it.
Since the title of this piece deals with speed let’s try to address it. The question is “Can a stringer do a quality string job in 15 minutes or less?” The answer is yes and I’ve seen it done in less time by the most proficient stringer. This includes straightening the strings right down to the last tie-off knot. Tournament stringers have far less wasted motion, their movement around the stringer is like a well oiled, finely tuned machine. They’re always thinking ahead when they string and once they get warmed up it’s a thing of beauty to watch. There are secrets that never leave the tournament stringing room and some of them pertain directly to speed. When your opportunity comes and you find yourself in the stringing room of a Grand Slam event you have to be alert and pay attention for many reasons, most of all to learn from others you’re working with. If you ever have the opportunity to watch a true professional in the frenzied environment of a top level tournament your mind will forever be changed when it comes to the question about how fast and how proficient the work is being done. My guess is that the next thing you will be doing, if you’re a stringer, is practicing a lot and asking yourself “I saw it with my own eyes but I still don’t know how in the world he/she did that?” Good luck!

BobFL
08-16-2010, 10:58 AM
My first string job took 1 hour and 33 minutes :D My fastest string job happened 3 days ago: 2 x APD in 86 minutes. Well, I am really familiar with APDs/PDs and I really go fast but with totally new frame I would certainly need more time...Btw, I have Klippermate...

onefromcov
08-16-2010, 11:40 AM
Below 20 mins on a stringway ms200.Just strung a badminton stick in 35 mins including cutting string and mounting.

Lefty5
08-16-2010, 11:55 AM
there has to be some parameters set...i.e. the time should count cutting out strings, mounting, to unmounting the racket. Most folks I know only time the part where they are actually weaving strings...

Rabbit
08-16-2010, 02:27 PM
OK, just for hits and giggles, I sorta timed myself stringing one of my C10s. I started a movie on Netflix, Instant View on my PC, mounted the frame, strung it at 54.5 constant pull with a hybrid, poly mains and multi crosses. After I took the frame off, I checked the time into the movie....28M 35S.

A couple of factors. I was waching the movie while I strung and really wasn't rushing. A hybrid is slower than a one-piece.

The movie was Boondock Saints.

GarrettReid
08-17-2010, 03:29 PM
You need an option "I've never strung a racket." :p

diredesire
08-21-2010, 11:08 AM
I'm just trying to understand why the need for speed?

->Is it because you guys are pros and can make more money by stringing more?
->Or you can get out the door and play some tennis?
->Just plain I'm faster than you like doing a puzzle

I string only for myself and find it to be a relaxing activity that I want to take time and do it right.
I don't know about other (ONLY) stringers, but:
I (used to --> on break) string for a D1 college, and I get paid per frame. The terms are set as such: ALL frames are due back the next day, regardless of # of frames. I've had nights where I've had 13-20 frames (many/most times I share these piles with another guy). Needless to say, if I strung an average of 15 mins/frame, I can get 4 done in an hour. Increase each frame time by a "measly" 5 mins to 20 mins/frame, I can only get 3 done per hour.

Edit: I should also add that I (obviously) cannot start stringing UNTIL practices are over. This is as late as 6:00 PM. Obviously, I'm doing other stuff at this time, (eating, etc). I often get "into" work at 8-10PM. Figuring in a 3/hour time frame, with 9+ racquets (each guy), I get back home later than midnight frequently. It's not glamorous! Speed became a necessity, with quality obviously at the top of my priority lists. I definitely figured out where I could cut time off my process. I also (for batch stringing) like to do "every related action" at once. This means checking over frames (if necessary), looking for bumper guards needing replacement, cutting strings out, sorting out who is going to be doing what frames (for instance, I'm faster on softer strings, so to optimize time, I will often take a higher number than average of synthetics/hybrids). We'll uncoil and pre-stretch if necessary, and put reels next to the people that need them. It gets to look like a hurricane blew through our stringing area, but we all know what's up. After the stringing process, we re-arrange the racquets by brand and stencil in parallel (we are required to stencil :().

Couple this with the fact that I'm an engineering major pursuing my Master's, with ridiculous lab assignments, etc, time is of the essence. I also get paid per frame, so there is no benefit to taking my time. Some pro-shop stringers get paid hourly with a per frame "bonus" per racquet strung, so they don't have the urgency to finish frames. They also have to attend to customers...


lol, "Lone Ranger".

I was actually thinking I would have strung it faster on the Neos. I think I could of, just because of the pull on the crank being faster, and release. Also, the damn mounting arms not being in the way.
[snip]
At tournaments, it's almost a must that one get the racquet strung and into the players hand as quickly as possible. In my case, I string at all the nationals here at the club. many times, during a tournament, I'll have a player come up to me and say, "I'm going on in 30 minutes. Could you string the frame for me?" Of course, I'll have to finish the frame I'm working on very quickly, then turn around and do that one as fast as I can, without doing a crappy job.

Just a few examples.

When I'm at home stringing for customers, I obviously take more time as there is not a mad rush, but I still get them done quickly.
Yeah, when you're REGULARLY working with a NEOS, it gets really fast. The mounting system is seriously built for speed, and it's great in general.

I agree, even if I'm stringing for "leisure," I still string pretty fast <20 mins. Once you've optimized your work flow, why not? It's not as if you're cutting corners by going faster, you're just moving/working your body more efficiently/faster. Quality is completely possible at very high speeds.


It worries me a little that recently there's been alot of threads on here about time taken to string. For all new stringers reading this - please ignore our stories of 15-20 minute stringjobs! Quality of service is most important by a country mile, speed only matters if you put yourself in a situation like tournament stringing - and even then if the quality suffers you won't be around long!

Please don't fall into the trap of trying to be fast - try to be good, very good! Your customers will remember the quality service you gave them, not the fact that you did their racquet in 15 minutes!
Ash

Agree. It's sort of this image that stringing fast is super glamorous, it's not. Once you get up to a certain level of handling a machine, and the work flow and process becomes second nature, you can start focusing on the inefficiencies of your work. When you're in the process of learning, and you have to think about each step you're doing, double checking your weaves every time, etc, take your time and do it right. When you can (to a certain extent) "cruise control" the process, you can worry about optimizations. Stringing, at first is a very mentally active process. Once you really learn, and understand what you're (REALLY) doing, you can focus your brain power on other parts of the process. (Note how much time you spend searching for string ends. Note how much time you take fanning crosses, and consider if that time could be spent better --> Incorporate fanning/pulling strings through while the (electric) tensioner is going [although I'm not someone that does this, due to the weaving one ahead stagger being more gentle on strings], etc).

Good points, all.