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RogerRacket111
08-11-2010, 09:40 AM
As I have played USTA I have noticed that a lot of people foot fault. Its really to tough to catch it when you play singles but in doubles the guy at the net should be able to call it. What do you guys think?

I know your going to come of as a jerk but its a really big advantage to step even a half a step and serve. Why do so many people foot fault?

polski
08-11-2010, 09:44 AM
http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Game/Rules/Rules-and-Line-Calls/Foot_Faulting/

From the horse's mouth:

Foot Faulting
Q. Can your opponent call foot fault on you when there is no referee?

A. The Code states that “compliance with the foot fault rule is very much a function of the player’s personal honor system.” If a player is committing flagrant foot faults, then an opponent CAN call him/her on it. But it is a pretty bold move to do so. He/she had better be certain that you have stepped on or over the line prior to contact before making this call.

For the record, habitual foot faulting is as bad as intentionally cheating on line calls. That said, I always urge players to focus on their side of the net, and executing their returns of serve, instead of worrying about whether an opponent has or has not stepped on or over the baseline during the serve.

Q. In a league match (no officials around), what happens when someone is told they are foot faulting, and they (a) disagree, or (b) say "sorry" but do it again. Who gets to decide if they should lose the point?

A. Ahhh… this seems to be a lingering issue…

If they are truly guilty of foot faulting, then they are cheating. If they disagree or continue doing it, then you have a challenging situation on your hands. I would advise you to avoid worrying about their side of the net and concentrate on what you need to do to win the next point.

There will always be players out there who cheat, sometimes- of course- unwittingly. It is your prerogative to handle yourself. If they CHOOSE to cheat, there is not much that you can do to get satisfaction. Maybe try extra hard to beat them.

Q. I would like to know the appropriate course of action to take when an opponent is grossly foot faulting consistently. I found myself in this situation recently, and was not sure how to handle the situation and stay within USTA guidelines.

A. Ask them politely to stop stepping over the line when they serve. You had BETTER be sure that you are in the right though. Remember, you are basically telling them that they are cheating- so be careful with how you handle this accusation.

Taking this a step further, I realize that a “foot fault” is not legal and that it should be considered a missed serve. However, as an opponent, does the foot fault have much effect on your own play? Not really. You might be better served to just concentrate on your side of the court.

Q. When I am serving I tend to foot fault. What should I do so I don't foot fault, but still have a good serve?

A. If/when you are called for foot fault during a match, do NOT change anything. Just simply back up a few inches.

During a match, it is best not to change your technique. Backing up a few inches will not compromise the power or placement of your serves.

tennisdad65
08-11-2010, 11:05 AM
... Its really to tough to catch it when you play singles but in doubles the guy at the net should be able to call it. What do you guys think?


when someone is serving the opposing netman is normally at the service line, not at the net.. i.e. it is tough to see even in doubles.

r2473
08-11-2010, 11:27 AM
As I have played USTA I have noticed that a lot of people foot fault.

Pretty much everyone does.

So, keeping this in mind, I like to call foot-faults when my opponent serves an ace. Not only do I not lose that point, but it often gets me a few additional points (because he is so ****ed off).

Sometimes he's so angry, he'll donate the entire match.

Try it. I'm sure this little trick will work for you too.

Now, concerning the subject of line calls...........

MurrayisBEAST
08-11-2010, 11:37 AM
Pretty much everyone does.

So, keeping this in mind, I like to call foot-faults when my opponent serves an ace. Not only do I not lose that point, but it often gets me a few additional points (because he is so ****ed off).

Sometimes he's so angry, he'll donate the entire match.

Try it. I'm sure this little trick will work for you too.

Now, concerning the subject of line calls...........

Wow! That's devious lol. I usually play jerks that would tell me to "YOU CAN'T SAY THAT" if I called that lol. Foot faulting never actually affects a point so I wish we didn't have to worry about it.

West Coast Ace
08-11-2010, 11:40 AM
Pretty much everyone does.

...I like to call foot-faults when my opponent serves an ace....I hope this is sarcasm.

JoelDali
08-11-2010, 11:54 AM
At the playoffs last week roving USTA officials were calling footfaults all over the place. It was freakin' comical watching the NTRP hackers (that includes me) adjust their serves, being all self conscious and nervous with the officials watching.

Is it really that damn difficult to NOT foot fault?

tnnsman7
08-11-2010, 11:55 AM
Last year at the state tournament we played a team where one player would two foot/foot fault. The USTA official watched him do it 4 or 5 times before calling it. So evidently, even they are reluctant to call it some times.

RogerRacket111
08-11-2010, 12:49 PM
when someone is serving the opposing netman is normally at the service line, not at the net.. i.e. it is tough to see even in doubles.

When your up front next to the net or at the serve line and don't have to watch every ball and return the ball its quite easy to watch the foot of the server. If you can't see it then its your bad.

RogerRacket111
08-11-2010, 12:53 PM
Pretty much everyone does.(Double Faults)
...........
I don't....

r2473
08-11-2010, 12:58 PM
I don't....

Ah, one of those guys.

tennisdad65
08-11-2010, 01:02 PM
Pretty much everyone does.....

from my experience, about a third of the people (30-35%) foot fault. 5-10% are really bad (1-2 ft foot faults).

I have a classical style serve with lead foot 'supposedly planted' till contact. I still stand 5-6 inches behind the line, because I have a very closed stance, and my lead foot rotates along with torso rotation.

Also, I think a higher percentage of lower level players foot fault (3.5-4.5) , whereas very few of the 5.0 and 5.5's foot fault.

RogerRacket111
08-11-2010, 01:11 PM
It all occurred to me while I watching a USTA dbls match and noticed that our opponent was foot-faulting when I thought of complaining I noticed my team mates were doing the same.

I also wondered if I was doing the same and had to have have my friends check me out while I play and I wasn't.

I think its an unfair advantage and should be called especially the guys you really step in with their lead foot.

NoSkillzAndy
08-11-2010, 01:11 PM
I'm not sure I've ever had the nerve to call one of my opponents for foot faulting. The only time I could think of doing it is if they have a powerful serve that's giving me problems AND their foot faulting is really obvious (eg. entire foot inside the court) AND the match actually matters for something. In that situation they would definitely be benefiting from being closer in and taking advantage of it by hitting big serves that have less of a chance of going into the net.

In general though, I usually don't mind it from most players -- and in fact I expect it to a certain degree. But with guys that have good serves, it seems rather unsportsmanlike if they continually cheat by moving more than an accidental amount inside the court.

NoSkillzAndy
08-11-2010, 01:16 PM
Also, I think a higher percentage of lower level players foot fault (3.5-4.5) , whereas very few of the 5.0 and 5.5's foot fault.

That's almost certainly true, but it does happen some at the higher levels too. One of the best Open level players in Texas routinely foot faults with both feet when he serves. Not sure any of the roaming officials have the balls to call him on it though ;)

dizzlmcwizzl
08-11-2010, 01:59 PM
One time about 5 years ago one of my team mates told me I was foot faulting, and I was conviced he was wrong .... Until other teamates chimed in and backed him up.

Since then I have tried to correct it. I have taped myself and asked people to watch for it from the sidelines. They all say I do not foot fault when I ask them, however I am still uncertain I have corrected it. You know, I am unsure if I do something different when I know I am being watched.

pmerk34
08-11-2010, 02:23 PM
from my experience, about a third of the people (30-35%) foot fault. 5-10% are really bad (1-2 ft foot faults).

I have a classical style serve with lead foot 'supposedly planted' till contact. I still stand 5-6 inches behind the line, because I have a very closed stance, and my lead foot rotates along with torso rotation.

Also, I think a higher percentage of lower level players foot fault (3.5-4.5) , whereas very few of the 5.0 and 5.5's foot fault.

That's becuase 5.0's and above virtually all have had extensive professional instruction

r2473
08-11-2010, 02:32 PM
That's becuase 5.0's and above virtually all have had extensive professional instruction

I don't know.....most people on this site are 5.0's and above (self rate) and haven't had one single lesson.

pmerk34
08-11-2010, 02:33 PM
I don't know.....most people on this site are 5.0's and above (self rate) and haven't had one single lesson.

Right. Self rate must be the key word. The 5.0's I see at the clubs have been taught.

tennismonkey
08-11-2010, 07:54 PM
foot faults are rampid. so is the use of HGH i hear.

NoSkillzAndy
08-11-2010, 07:57 PM
foot faults are rampid. so is the use of HGH i hear.

Nice :mrgreen:

tennytive
08-12-2010, 07:40 AM
That's becuase 5.0's and above virtually all have had extensive professional instruction

When I was roving, I would see challenge ladder tournament players, especially in doubles foot faulting ad nauseam. However when I made my way over to their court, their feet magically stayed behind the line.

5.0, 5.5, it still happens. Even Serena foot faults. Although if you ask her she'll deny it.

813wilson
08-12-2010, 08:43 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-n45uv46xS8&feature=related

Not me by the way....

pmerk34
08-12-2010, 08:51 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-n45uv46xS8&feature=related

Not me by the way....

That is the flagrant type that most of use would not tolerate LOL

RogerRacket111
08-12-2010, 08:55 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-n45uv46xS8&feature=related

Not me by the way....

I see this all the time. This is what bugs me.