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Bud
08-12-2010, 04:32 AM
Are there any other hummus (not hummer :mrgreen:) addicts out there? It's much more economical to make your own and you can customize it to taste, as well.

Here's a recipe that I've gradually tweaked to near perfection!

- - - - -

Ingredients: makes about 24 oz.

1 15-16 oz. can of chick peas/garbanzo beans (strain the juice and set aside) - do not discard the juice
5 tablespoons tahini
4-5 tablespoons real lemon juice
1/2 tablespoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (olive oil will also work)
1-2 tablespoons pine nuts
1 garlic clove
2 green onions (scallions)

Mix all ingredients in a food processor and add additional garbanzo bean juice until the mixture is smooth. You should end up using 1/2 to 3/4 of the extra bean juice.

Pour into a glass bowl and cover.

Let sit in the fridge for at least 4-6 hours to allow the flavors to all blend together.


Enjoy! :)

El Diablo
08-12-2010, 06:51 AM
for a more subtle and refined flavor, 8 ounces garbanzo and 8 ounces italian white (kidney) beans instead of the 16 of garbanzo, and add a pinch of oregano. A few bits of garlic if you like.

Slayer_of_Kings
08-12-2010, 09:08 AM
One of the secrets to a great as opposed to an ordinary hummus is in the kind of chickpeas used. DON'T even think about using canned store-bought garbanzos to make your hummus. In the Middle East/Levant, chickpeas are smaller and darker than the (Mexican) chickpea used here. They have a much richer flavor, but DO need to be shelled. While almost imossible to find here, you can use the Indian KALA CHANA which is identical to the type used by the Palestinian hummus masters. Most Indian/Pakistani markets carry them and they're easy to cook.

Bud
08-12-2010, 12:10 PM
for a more subtle and refined flavor, 8 ounces garbanzo and 8 ounces italian white (kidney) beans instead of the 16 of garbanzo, and add a pinch of oregano. A few bits of garlic if you like.

Will try this next time

One of the secrets to a great as opposed to an ordinary hummus is in the kind of chickpeas used. DON'T even think about using canned store-bought garbanzos to make your hummus. In the Middle East/Levant, chickpeas are smaller and darker than the (Mexican) chickpea used here. They have a much richer flavor, but DO need to be shelled. While almost imossible to find here, you can use the Indian KALA CHANA which is identical to the type used by the Palestinian hummus masters. Most Indian/Pakistani markets carry them and they're easy to cook.

Thanks for the tip :)

Slayer_of_Kings
08-12-2010, 02:55 PM
Everybody that has tried my hummus has said it's the best they've ever had, and that includes Middle-Easterners and those who have been to Isreal and know the 'real thing':


1 cup dried chick peas
1/2 tsp baking soda

3 garlic cloves (finely minced)
1/4 C or 3Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup tahini
1/2-1 Tsp cumin seeds (toasted and ground)
3 1/2 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tsp salt

good pinch good quality pa****a cayenne
1/4 cup minced parsley or mint
* optional -toasted pine nuts, sumac
- whole cooked ckickpeas


- Cook the chickpeas, add some baking soda and salt(to thicken the outer skins). Save the chickpea reserved cooking water from the cooking! Then shell them, grind and strain (very important!)

- Then mix them along with the garlic lemon juice, cumin, olive oil and salt in a food processor. Then pour in the tahini last. Slowly add as much chickpea cooking juice as you need to reach your right consistency and flavor.

- Refrigerate overnight to blend the flavors.

- When ready to serve, garnish by making a shallow depression around the top of the hummus with a fork and pour small amounts of (your best) olive oil on top (prevents crusting). Sprinkle pa****a/cayenne around the edges and do the same with the parsley or mint, and sprinkle a little of that ground toasted cumin if you have any left. Toasted pine nuts and sumac add a Lebanese flair if you want. It also helps to sprinkle the top with some whole cooked chickpeas.


The chickpea to the far right is the one you want to get to make this:

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_I6CUHNfmSSE/SzCOZfX9sPI/AAAAAAAAEc0/XBTJ3DwnpQo/chickpeas%20small%20065.jpg

Slayer_of_Kings
08-12-2010, 02:57 PM
pa****a ..lol

For some reason, TALK TENNIS is editing out the middle four letters of the word (probably an obscenity in Croatian or something). But I'm sure you know the word means this:

http://images.surlatable.com/surlatable/images/en_US//local/products/detail/636415.jpg

Bud
08-12-2010, 07:35 PM
Everybody that has tried my hummus has said it's the best they've ever had, and that includes Middle-Easterners and those who have been to Isreal and know the 'real thing':


1 cup dried chick peas
1/2 tsp baking soda

3 garlic cloves (finely minced)
1/4 C or 3Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup tahini
1/2-1 Tsp cumin seeds (toasted and ground)
3 1/2 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tsp salt

good pinch good quality pa****a cayenne
1/4 cup minced parsley or mint
* optional -toasted pine nuts, sumac
- whole cooked ckickpeas


- Cook the chickpeas, add some baking soda and salt(to thicken the outer skins). Save the chickpea reserved cooking water from the cooking! Then shell them, grind and strain (very important!)

- Then mix them along with the garlic lemon juice, cumin, olive oil and salt in a food processor. Then pour in the tahini last. Slowly add as much chickpea cooking juice as you need to reach your right consistency and flavor.

- Refrigerate overnight to blend the flavors.

- When ready to serve, garnish by making a shallow depression around the top of the hummus with a fork and pour small amounts of (your best) olive oil on top (prevents crusting). Sprinkle pa****a/cayenne around the edges and do the same with the parsley or mint, and sprinkle a little of that ground toasted cumin if you have any left. Toasted pine nuts and sumac add a Lebanese flair if you want. It also helps to sprinkle the top with some whole cooked chickpeas.


The chickpea to the far right is the one you want to get to make this:

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_I6CUHNfmSSE/SzCOZfX9sPI/AAAAAAAAEc0/XBTJ3DwnpQo/chickpeas%20small%20065.jpg

Excellent post!

Will try and obtain some of these exotic chickpeas... the ones I use look like the Hadas :)

What's the benefit of mincing the garlic? I stick the entire clove directly into the food processor and it grinds it up completely.

I think the word filter is for pri k or pric k (American slang for penis) - funny TT doesn't filter out the latter :lol:

Tina
08-12-2010, 07:39 PM
Bud, May I have a glass of drink?

Are there any other hummus (not hummer :mrgreen:) addicts out there? It's much more economical to make your own and you can customize it to taste, as well.

Here's a recipe that I've gradually tweaked to near perfection!

- - - - -

Ingredients: makes about 24 oz.

1 15-16 oz. can of chick peas/garbanzo beans (strain the juice and set aside) - do not discard the juice
5 tablespoons tahini
5 tablespoons real lemon juice
1 tablespoons salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (olive oil will also work)
1 tablespoons pine nuts
1 garlic clove
2 green onions (scallions)

Mix all ingredients in a food processor and add additional garbanzo bean juice until the mixture is smooth. You should end up using 1/2 to 3/4 of the extra bean juice.

Pour into a glass bowl and cover.

Let sit in the fridge for at least 4-6 hours to allow the flavors to all blend together.


Enjoy! :)

Bud
08-12-2010, 07:43 PM
Bud, May I have a glass of drink?

Lol! I was wondering where you were lately, Tina. You ever get moved into your new place?

Tina
08-12-2010, 07:45 PM
Lol! I was wondering where you were lately, Tina. You ever get moved into your new place?

Yeah, I am in a new location but need to clean up my apt by end of this month. How are you, Bud? Any good news from you?

Bud
08-12-2010, 08:40 PM
Yeah, I am in a new location but need to clean up my apt by end of this month. How are you, Bud? Any good news from you?

Currently in a holding pattern :wink:

Tina
08-12-2010, 08:43 PM
Currently in a holding pattern :wink:

You made an aircraft?

davey
08-12-2010, 08:55 PM
Thanks for the recipes. I have used hummus as a substitute for mayo on sandwiches or to make tuna salad(very good). It's also good with potato chips or tortilla chips.

Any other suggestions on how to use hummus?

Bud
08-12-2010, 09:15 PM
Thanks for the recipes. I have used hummus as a substitute for mayo on sandwiches or to make tuna salad(very good). It's also good with potato chips or tortilla chips.

Any other suggestions on how to use hummus?

It's also great in a pita pocket with some lettuce, tomato, greek olives, etc.

Bartelby
08-13-2010, 02:55 AM
It's an extremely bad idea to do anything other than to rinse the beans and throw away the liquid they come in and just use some water or extra oil.



Are there any other hummus (not hummer :mrgreen:) addicts out there? It's much more economical to make your own and you can customize it to taste, as well.

Here's a recipe that I've gradually tweaked to near perfection!

- - - - -

Ingredients: makes about 24 oz.

1 15-16 oz. can of chick peas/garbanzo beans (strain the juice and set aside) - do not discard the juice
5 tablespoons tahini
5 tablespoons real lemon juice
1 tablespoons salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (olive oil will also work)
1 tablespoons pine nuts
1 garlic clove
2 green onions (scallions)

Mix all ingredients in a food processor and add additional garbanzo bean juice until the mixture is smooth. You should end up using 1/2 to 3/4 of the extra bean juice.

Pour into a glass bowl and cover.

Let sit in the fridge for at least 4-6 hours to allow the flavors to all blend together.


Enjoy! :)

Dilettante
08-13-2010, 03:34 AM
pa****a ..lol

For some reason, TALK TENNIS is editing out the middle four letters of the word (probably an obscenity in Croatian or something). But I'm sure you know the word means this:

http://images.surlatable.com/surlatable/images/en_US//local/products/detail/636415.jpg

I love pimentón, both in the sweet and hot versions.

You can make anything if you have pimentón and a soft olive oil.

Bud
08-13-2010, 03:40 AM
It's an extremely bad idea to do anything other than to rinse the beans and throw away the liquid they come in and just use some water or extra oil.

How bad can it be?? :confused:

The beans have been soaking in it for weeks (at least).

Bartelby
08-13-2010, 03:54 AM
It's brine or salted water and the bean juice it produces will give most people flatulence. If you use water the taste will be cleaner and you'll be able to control the salt level. Try drinking bean juice out of the can and I guarantee you'll never use it again.



How bad can it be?? :confused:

The beans have been soaking in it for weeks (at least).

Bartelby
08-13-2010, 04:25 AM
If you want a creamier taste you can also use plain yoghurt instead of bean juice or water.

TW Staff
08-13-2010, 09:19 AM
I like to make a garlic paste before blending all the ingredients together. I think it helps ensure no one gets a chunk of garlic just in case I don't mix it all together well enough.

To make the paste I sprinkle some salt (sea salt or kosher) on the garlic clove(s) and smash it into a paste with the back of a knife.

Tiffani, TW

Bud
08-13-2010, 11:02 AM
It's brine or salted water and the bean juice it produces will give most people flatulence. If you use water the taste will be cleaner and you'll be able to control the salt level. Try drinking bean juice out of the can and I guarantee you'll never use it again.

Lol! I'll give it a try.

If you want a creamier taste you can also use plain yoghurt instead of bean juice or water.

Will also try this next time. Do you add it until the desired consistency is reached? Yogurt is pretty thick. Plain yogurt?

I like to make a garlic paste before blending all the ingredients together. I think it helps ensure no one gets a chunk of garlic just in case I don't mix it all together well enough.

To make the paste I sprinkle some salt (sea salt or kosher) on the garlic clove(s) and smash it into a paste with the back of a knife.

Tiffani, TW

How do you make a garlic paste... just mash it up with a mortar and pestle (sorry not a cook here) :)

TW Staff
08-13-2010, 12:22 PM
How do you make a garlic paste... just mash it up with a mortar and pestle (sorry not a cook here) :)

I'm sure a mortar and pestle would work, but what I do is peel the garlic clove, put the salt on top, and then used the flat side of a chef's knife to crush it, mashing it over and over into the cutting board until it's in a paste form.

Tiffani

Tina
08-13-2010, 08:51 PM
I'm sure a mortar and pestle would work, but what I do is peel the garlic clove, put the salt on top, and then used the flat side of a chef's knife to crush it, mashing it over and over into the cutting board until it's in a paste form.

Tiffani

Sounds like you are an expert wine taster as well, Tiffani.:)

Bartelby
08-13-2010, 11:24 PM
You don't need a lot of yoghurt - a couple of tablespoons is probably enough. Plain is not sweetened so it's better and use greek yoghurt for richness.

Tiffany's version of doing garlic is the professional way, but you can just 'microplane' the garlic into the bowl.




Lol! I'll give it a try.



Will also try this next time. Do you add it until the desired consistency is reached? Yogurt is pretty thick. Plain yogurt?



How do you make a garlic paste... just mash it up with a mortar and pestle (sorry not a cook here) :)

Bartelby
08-14-2010, 12:44 AM
The right microplane will make the garlic form a paste on the back of it that you simply push off into the bowl.

Bud
08-14-2010, 03:23 PM
I'm sure a mortar and pestle would work, but what I do is peel the garlic clove, put the salt on top, and then used the flat side of a chef's knife to crush it, mashing it over and over into the cutting board until it's in a paste form.

Tiffani

Excellent... thanks for the tip. Will try it in paste form for the next batch :)

The right microplane will make the garlic form a paste on the back of it that you simply push off into the bowl.

Is that a vegetable slicer? Cheese grater?

http://lh4.googleusercontent.com/TN_cGxJSetnkbjHhRiWosmJFDRtm8ooTHBgtF1rM7onJxoWthA 7HJkf-MXSLw3a915O_LO8YEMu6bC4siM-4pgGB0AIFt-Bi58s7_UpRGsSGMPz21j_FQgTuoeZAcyfuhq7Dcaj7k2KxR84a pWAGpTGuzS9O6p8VZq9MWzbvKsh9dHyPiJpTolBpNuL1faFeHX u-FUmnUwAXtyY

Tina
08-14-2010, 09:20 PM
Hey Bud,

Next time, when you hold a drinking party, don't forget to send me an invitation. Love to taste of your recipes ^_^.

Bud
08-15-2010, 06:51 AM
Hey Bud,

Next time, when you hold a drinking party, don't forget to send me an invitation. Love to taste of your recipes ^_^.

You'll be first on the list :D

MurrayisBEAST
08-15-2010, 01:03 PM
pa****a lol

LanEvo
08-15-2010, 03:05 PM
hey guys, I already have the hummus, but i wanna ask, what type of chips do you guys eat it with or dried pita breads, what do you guys use? I'd like to try something new.

Bartelby
08-15-2010, 09:09 PM
A grate American invention:

http://www.bonairetalk.com/newsgroup/messages/401028/404579.jpg

Bartelby
08-15-2010, 09:11 PM
http://us.microplane.com/ProductImages/k/40001m.jpg

dParis
08-15-2010, 10:10 PM
How do you make a garlic paste... just mash it up with a mortar and pestle (sorry not a cook here) :)
A mortar and pestle, with a pinch of kosher or sea salt would be my first choice. I received a m&p as a gift and I was like, "Whaaa???". Now, I'd crack someone over the head with it if they tried to take it out of my kitchen. It's great for making chili/garlic pastes and pulverizing seeds into powder. I've been adding crushed annatto seed (secret ingredient) to my chix breast marinade and it's knocked everyone else's off the grill. The microplane works too. If you have neither a m&p or a microplane, the side of the knife trick will do.
Is that a vegetable slicer? Cheese grater?

http://lh4.googleusercontent.com/TN_cGxJSetnkbjHhRiWosmJFDRtm8ooTHBgtF1rM7onJxoWthA 7HJkf-MXSLw3a915O_LO8YEMu6bC4siM-4pgGB0AIFt-Bi58s7_UpRGsSGMPz21j_FQgTuoeZAcyfuhq7Dcaj7k2KxR84a pWAGpTGuzS9O6p8VZq9MWzbvKsh9dHyPiJpTolBpNuL1faFeHX u-FUmnUwAXtyY
Vegetable slicer, aka a mandolin. A couple of nice, sharp knives will do the work and are easier to clean.
A grate American invention:

http://www.bonairetalk.com/newsgroup/messages/401028/404579.jpg
I love the microplane. Joy of Life to Cost ratio is very high!
hey guys, I already have the hummus, but i wanna ask, what type of chips do you guys eat it with or dried pita breads, what do you guys use? I'd like to try something new.
Trader Joe's pita chips are fun, or try it on top of sliced cucumbers. Sprinkle a bit of sumac over the hummus to add a tasty accent.

Bartelby
08-16-2010, 12:27 AM
Let's make that a rap!:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIybz6axr1Q&feature=related

LanEvo
08-16-2010, 12:33 AM
A mortar and pestle, with a pinch of kosher or sea salt would be my first choice. I received a m&p as a gift and I was like, "Whaaa???". Now, I'd crack someone over the head with it if they tried to take it out of my kitchen. It's great for making chili/garlic pastes and pulverizing seeds into powder. I've been adding crushed annatto seed (secret ingredient) to my chix breast marinade and it's knocked everyone else's off the grill. The microplane works too. If you have neither a m&p or a microplane, the side of the knife trick will do.

Vegetable slicer, aka a mandolin. A couple of nice, sharp knives will do the work and are easier to clean.

I love the microplane. Joy of Life to Cost ratio is very high!

Trader Joe's pita chips are fun, or try it on top of sliced cucumbers. Sprinkle a bit of sumac over the hummus to add a tasty accent.

I'll definitely try the cucumber, never heard of that before.

Bud
08-16-2010, 03:25 AM
A grate American invention:

http://www.bonairetalk.com/newsgroup/messages/401028/404579.jpg

So, it's a bit like a mini cheese grater... with a handle

Nice pun, BTW ;)


hey guys, I already have the hummus, but i wanna ask, what type of chips do you guys eat it with or dried pita breads, what do you guys use? I'd like to try something new.

I like these: Nairns Fine Oatcake Crackers

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQge7zx10w0ImImYh0JfD9N-uMBJl3pWWBvI0loW5O6qUibduI&t=1&usg=__11fOGt-Coiklde9hiZWNlGRF0VE=

Bartelby
08-16-2010, 05:18 AM
They make cheese graters, but this one is called a zester so it reduces garlic to a pulp.




So, it's a bit like a mini cheese grater... with a handle

Nice pun, BTW ;)




I like these: Nairns Fine Oatcake Crackers

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQge7zx10w0ImImYh0JfD9N-uMBJl3pWWBvI0loW5O6qUibduI&t=1&usg=__11fOGt-Coiklde9hiZWNlGRF0VE=

Pro_Tour_630
08-16-2010, 05:21 AM
One of the secrets to a great as opposed to an ordinary hummus is in the kind of chickpeas used. DON'T even think about using canned store-bought garbanzos to make your hummus. In the Middle East/Levant, chickpeas are smaller and darker than the (Mexican) chickpea used here. They have a much richer flavor, but DO need to be shelled. While almost imossible to find here, you can use the Indian KALA CHANA which is identical to the type used by the Palestinian hummus masters. Most Indian/Pakistani markets carry them and they're easy to cook.

nice copy and past are you arktos by any chance ?

http://www.chow.com/food-news/55578/the-basics-how-to-make-hummus/

Bartelby
08-16-2010, 05:27 AM
This goes well with hummus:


http://www.exploringbodrum.com/images/belly-dance02c.jpg

Slayer_of_Kings
08-16-2010, 10:52 AM
nice copy and past are you arktos by any chance ?

http://www.chow.com/food-news/55578/the-basics-how-to-make-hummus/

Yes I am. And I'm also 'Arktos' on SFGate.com.