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View Full Version : Different Tensions on Mains and Crosses?


frosty8722
08-23-2010, 03:34 PM
I was just wondering what was the purpose of having different tensions on the mains and crosses on hybrids. Especially with mains at a higher one than that of the crosses.

And is this only just for hybrids or can the purpose hold true over a full bed?

tennisace23
08-23-2010, 04:31 PM
I was just wondering what was the purpose of having different tensions on the mains and crosses on hybrids. Especially with mains at a higher one than that of the crosses.

And is this only just for hybrids or can the purpose hold true over a full bed?

A lot of it is just personal preference, feel. It holds true for full bed as well as hybrid. In terms of the mains being at a higher tension than crosses, my understanding is this: since the mains are longer, and there are more crosses across a shorter distance, stringing the mains a couple pounds higher is believed to help equalize the pressure around the frame.

In terms of stringing crosses higher than mains, some people feel it helps decrease movement of the mains. Whether crosses are higher, or mains are higher, more than a 3-4 lb differential will distort the frame (and therefore change physical dimensions of head, and playing properties).

fuzz nation
08-23-2010, 05:26 PM
Lots of players like to hybrid a poly with something a lot softer like a multifiber to get a combination of control and not-so-harsh feel. Poly is typically strung at roughly 10% lower tension than would be used for a syn. gut or multi in the same application, so a hybrid layout with multi or natural gut in the mains and a poly cross would certainly have higher tension in the mains.

Kevlar hybrids usually have the tougher kevlar in the mains with a softer option in the crosses. Since the kevlar has next to zero elasticity, it can be installed at much lower tension than the syn. gut or multi crosses for better feel along with decent control.

Yonex used to recommend using a few pounds higher tension in the mains than the crosses of their frames due to the nature of the square-ish shaped hoops. The frames apparently had better integrity with the tighter mains, but I'm not sure that they make that recommendation anymore.

frosty8722
08-24-2010, 06:39 AM
A lot of it is just personal preference, feel. It holds true for full bed as well as hybrid. In terms of the mains being at a higher tension than crosses, my understanding is this: since the mains are longer, and there are more crosses across a shorter distance, stringing the mains a couple pounds higher is believed to help equalize the pressure around the frame.

In terms of stringing crosses higher than mains, some people feel it helps decrease movement of the mains. Whether crosses are higher, or mains are higher, more than a 3-4 lb differential will distort the frame (and therefore change physical dimensions of head, and playing properties).

If 3-4 lbs differential distorts the frame, then isn't just harmful to the frame then in the end? So 1-3 lb difference is the so-called "safe-zone" before the frame begins to warp?

Lots of players like to hybrid a poly with something a lot softer like a multifiber to get a combination of control and not-so-harsh feel. Poly is typically strung at roughly 10% lower tension than would be used for a syn. gut or multi in the same application, so a hybrid layout with multi or natural gut in the mains and a poly cross would certainly have higher tension in the mains.

Kevlar hybrids usually have the tougher kevlar in the mains with a softer option in the crosses. Since the kevlar has next to zero elasticity, it can be installed at much lower tension than the syn. gut or multi crosses for better feel along with decent control.

Yonex used to recommend using a few pounds higher tension in the mains than the crosses of their frames due to the nature of the square-ish shaped hoops. The frames apparently had better integrity with the tighter mains, but I'm not sure that they make that recommendation anymore.

Thanks for your input. =]
If a poly were to be used as a main then, wouldn't both mains and crosses be strung at the same tension? When in reality, the synthetic / multi crosses would be a few lbs lower?

And also a side question, when they recommend to string polys at 10% less tension, what does that entail exactly and why is that necessary? ex: If you wanted to string at 60 lbs, you would instead set it to 54?

tennisace23
08-24-2010, 06:48 AM
If 3-4 lbs differential distorts the frame, then isn't just harmful to the frame then in the end? So 1-3 lb difference is the so-called "safe-zone" before the frame begins to warp?

To clarify, up to about 3 or 4 lbs is fine. BEYOND that is where you will most likely do damage.

Centered
08-24-2010, 12:03 PM
To clarify, up to about 3 or 4 lbs is fine. BEYOND that is where you will most likely do damage.
Some strings lose a lot more than that in comparison to others.

For instance, pre-stretched Prince Topspin 15L loses around 3 lbs while some polys lose 28 lbs or more.

tennisace23
08-24-2010, 12:38 PM
Some strings lose a lot more than that in comparison to others.

For instance, pre-stretched Prince Topspin 15L loses around 3 lbs while some polys lose 28 lbs or more.

I understand what you are saying, but I was referring to intentionally stringing the mains and crosses at different tensions (I wasn't referring to how much tension would eventually be lost). Obviously, in a hybrid with different strings, for sure the mains and crosses will lose different amount of tension at different rates.