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View Full Version : Ceramic Graphite Composite


Lakoste
05-28-2005, 07:55 PM
Whats the advantage of having this?

HeavyBall
05-28-2005, 08:34 PM
Flexible and very soft.

I hit the best half volleys imaginable with my Sting SC.

Lakoste
05-28-2005, 09:16 PM
HeavyBall

What string do you use?

Michelangelo
05-28-2005, 09:22 PM
I have a 10-year-old Prince Boron-Graphite longbody (the one similar to Michael Chang's versioin, but with 2 cross bars instead of 1) which was my 1st racket bought by my own money. However, it's nearly as harsh as Pro Staff 85 to my elbow after 2 hours of hitting. I'd definitely go for the 100% graphite version if I'd 2nd chance to choose again.

newnuse
05-29-2005, 12:42 PM
Flexible and very soft.

I hit the best half volleys imaginable with my Sting SC.


Yep, soft and flexible. They feel great and are easy on the arm. I love to volley with cermics. The control, feel and power is terrific on volleys.

Lakoste
05-29-2005, 02:08 PM
someone told me that they turn brittle and break, is that true

tonyjh63
05-29-2005, 07:57 PM
So which racquets are made of "ceramic graphite composite"?

HeavyBall
05-30-2005, 08:26 AM
All rackets (that I know of) containing ceramic are "ceramic graphite composites", as graphite would be a given in most non-wood, non-aluminum rackets. My Sting SC has Sensation strung at 56, making even softer.

My sting is 20 years old now and is in excellent condition, although it seems like wilson made more durable rackets back then than just about anyone.

NoBadMojo
05-30-2005, 08:41 AM
Ceramic is actually a stiff and harsh material..it isnt soft and flexile at all. thats why ceramic popularity was so short lived. an exception would be the Fischer VTPro98 which contained some sic ceramics in the layup. the maximum recommended tension for this frame was either 56 or 57 so that should tell you something. the ceramic craze was very highly hyped. a few manufacturers jumped on the bandwagon, and it faded as quickly as it appeared because ceramic is a very stiff brittle , and a harsh material which made for some pretty bad racquets..ones that were very tough on your body

Michelangelo
05-30-2005, 10:23 AM
Anyway, even though it's 20-mm flat shaft, my golden-color 10-year-old Boron-Graphite longbody is so hard that even harder than Pro Staff Tour 90. If I add some lead tape, then the pop when I serve would be crazy! Anyway, that racket with the suede full-size cover are now just for my collections (I won't sell it anyway, since it's the 1st stick I bought by my own money), I never use it anymore.

Lakoste
05-30-2005, 09:36 PM
do they last as long as regular graphite racquets?

Michelangelo
05-30-2005, 10:40 PM
No clue. However, it's more important that when you're using ceramic-graphite frame, your elbow (probably your wrist as well) is NOT gonna last as long as using regular graphite sticks. :P

007
05-31-2005, 01:15 PM
VT98 Pro IMO has THE BEST impact feel of ANY racquet made in the last decade or so. Soft but crisp at the same time with the perfect amount of feedback and damping. Sublime really.

newnuse
05-31-2005, 03:04 PM
NBM is right. I forgot, Ceramics are very brittle. The 80's ceramic rackets were usually some combination of graphite, ceramic and fiberglass. The ceramic rackets I hit with were all pretty soft as I recall. It was probably the fiberglass content that made it soft and flexible.

They did tend to break easier than Graphite/Fiberglass rackets. It might be due to the brittleness of the ceramic.

routlirh
06-01-2005, 06:08 AM
Is there any significant difference or are these the same? I stumbled upon an early version (elliptic comp) and am looking for a second racquet.
Thanks

007
06-01-2005, 07:19 AM
If you can't find another Elliptic try to find a Vacuum Pro 98 (purple ) or Vacuum Pro 95 (red).....both have 22 mm flat beam and are graphite/ceramic (SiC)/vacuum tecnhinc. AWESOME FRAMES!!!!!