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Parker512
08-25-2010, 04:25 PM
I know how to string. But i want to string for other people. But i live in the middle of eastern CT. Not a lot of tennis players and if so in the summer nearest indoor court is 40 minutes away. What stringer should i get looking pretty much at Eagnases because of price im 13 have $500 dollers and can get more. So keep it cheap. maybe a crank. But what should i do to get customers i dont break strings alot like 3 times a year. My town has like 6,000 people. Also they have 4 outdoor courts. Where would i string how would people drop raquets off to so i could string them. Heres the strings i would carry and prices.

Stringing Prices and Types
All string has a $5 stringing fee and $10 for hybrids.

Forten Nylon 16 $2.99

Prince Synthetic Gut with Duraflex 17 $4.99

Luxilon Big Banger Alu Power Spin 16 $17.99

Tecnifibre Black Code 17 and 18 string $15.00

Mantis Power Poly 17 $12.00

All coments welcomed!:)

Im in 8th Grade.

Like this one http://www.eagnas.com/smart600.html. This is max price.

Parker512
08-25-2010, 05:11 PM
The Flex 940.

jim e
08-25-2010, 05:37 PM
You are really short changing yourself if you only charge $5/ labor. I use to charge $10./ labor over 40 years ago. Actually that was in 1968, and I was 13 years old at that time.
The guy in the airport that shines shoes charges $7.00 and is done in under 10 min. add a $3.00 tip, and thats $60/ hour. Anyone can shine a pair of shoes, but would you want just anyone to string your racquet?
People will pay for your service if you supply them a good quality job, thats consistant each time. Keep in mind that you will get some players that will shank a ball and as such snap an early string job, bring it back to you for a free restring, and as such if you are like me, explain what happen, that its not your fault, string it for free the one time, and tell them its a one time deal.One time a player can bring in a slightly cracked frame from abuse, you forget to check it over well before you start the job, which some people here probably do as they comment on speed and how fast they string, and don't even bother to look it over , and you start the job and snap the racquet. Now you need to purchase a new racquet for that customer.How many $5.00 jobs do you have to string to just break even? One time I restrung an all nat. gut job for someone who brought the racquet back as the string broke within a day, after I restrung it again for free I later found out that he picked up a stone and hit it, and thats what broke the string.(That incident actually helped me out back then, as that made me realize to increase my fees, and back then it was my 1st fee increase. )
After a while you will get things like this happening, granted it is not a normal occurance, but you still need to incorporate things like this into your fee schedule.
Bottom line its your investment of machine, string supplies, tubing, grommets, grips, string inventory (which you will always be adding more and more as time goes on) , and your time, and your expertise of stringing racquets the proper way, and consistantly. Only you know the value of your time and what it is worth, and do you know how much time it will take you to string with the machine that you will end up with?
Once you set your fees, it is more difficult to raise them later.
Just some things to keep in mind.

Parker512
08-25-2010, 06:00 PM
Okay i originally had $10 but read other previous threads and decided to lower it. Ill kepp it at $10 now. You think $20 for hybrids i heard a couple days ago some one charged $70. Didnt plan on doing groments or grips. Cant even do my grips.

jim e
08-25-2010, 06:17 PM
Okay i originally had $10 but read other previous threads and decided to lower it. Ill kepp it at $10 now. You think $20 for hybrids i heard a couple days ago some one charged $70. Didnt plan on doing groments or grips. Cant even do my grips.

What are you going to do when someone drops off a racquet and some of the grommets are worn down, or cracked or even has only one bad grommet. All it takes is one bad grommet, and it will ruin an otherwise good string job. If you don't replace the grommet set, you should know how to replace a single grommet, or at least tube the grommet so you can still string it. The grommets should be checked before you cut the strings out, then look it over again once the strings are out as well.Once I had what appeared to be a racquet with all nice grommets. Once the strings were being installed, I noticed that the grommet had a small crack, that was not apparent with the strings out looking at it, but under tension against it it opened up the split. It ruined a $42.00 set of nat. gut, but that same grommet would ruin almost any string.So even if you look it over carefully things still can happen, although it is rare, occurances like this do happen, but once you start stringing, and the # of racquets start piling up, these things do occur once in a while.
Also , if you know how to string, you should also be able to re grip a racquet. It certainly is much easier than stringing, and takes hardly any time at all, and supplies a good service to your clients as well.If you can install an overgrip, you should be able to re grip a racquet as well.Overgrips are cheap, and if someone comes in with a bad worn out grip, I will place an overgrip on as a free courtesy as well.That brings the person back again for future string jobs, as he then knows you care about what you do.

Irvin
08-26-2010, 03:24 AM
It is one thing to know how to string and another thing to have strung a racket. Just because you watch someone ride a bike or swim in a pool does not mean you can do it. Have you ever strung a racket before?

The reason I ask this question is because not everyone will enjoy stringing a racket. No matter how much fun it looks like it is, how easy you think it may be, and how much money you think you can make if you do not like stringing the pure and simple fact is you will not string.

So you pay a lot of money and your stringer ends up collecting rust in the garage or basement until your parents sell it on the weekend at the yard sale.

If that happens and you bought a $500 to $800 machine it is like throwing your money away. I am sure you can't afford to do that.

For your first stringer I would suggest buying a machine where you can make all your money back as soon as possible. If you spend over $200 you are spending too much. That way you make your money back in 15 to 20 string jobs. You will also find out what it is like to find player's rackets for stringing. You will find out what stringing other people's rackets really means. Not that any of your customers will ever be unsatisfied, but when you offer a service for pay there will be customer expectations. You will find out some of the time you usually enjoy playing tennis is now being spent on stringing rackets.

I would suggest a Gamma Progression (http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Gamma_Progression_200_Stringing_Machine_/descpageGAMMA-GP200.html) stringer. If you string 15 rackets and don't like it you could sell it for a profit becasue your 15 rackets paid for the stringer. If you find out later you want something better so you can string rackets faster with you can sell it for a profit to go toward a better stringer. What can you lose?

Irvin

Bud
08-26-2010, 04:56 AM
Okay i originally had $10 but read other previous threads and decided to lower it. Ill kepp it at $10 now. You think $20 for hybrids i heard a couple days ago some one charged $70. Didnt plan on doing groments or grips. Cant even do my grips.

It should be the same, regardless. Hybrids are no more of an issue to string than 1 piece. Just charge appropriately for each 20' length of whatever string they choose.

schap02
08-26-2010, 05:44 AM
Just to chime in a bit here, if any of your parents friends play tennis - it always helps getting referrals from them, I have found with regards to my pricing - if you keep most people between $20 and $30/string job they'll be satisfied. I found it harder to charge a strings plus labor price, I'm moved to all flat fee pricing depending on what strings etc...Usually $20 for Syn guts, 30 for premium full poly jobs - rarely string the NG...

Irvin
08-26-2010, 08:40 AM
^^ I agree with that you have to take into account the time it takes you to string the string, the cost of the string, and your time when you are charging for rackets.

For example, the string I least like to string is Forten Gear. The main and like fly paper and the cross string are very soft. It probably takes me 5 minutes longer to string the crosses in that racket. Mainly because you have to go slower when pulling the crosses over the mains. It takes me about 20 to string a racket not counted another 10 minutes of setup and admin. So let's just say it takes 20% more time. So for that string is I normally mark up a string by $10 for my time I will mark up that string $2 more.

But to get started start by advertising your strings and the price for each. Make sure that when someone brings you a set of string to string for them they know your policy on stringing their strings. You do have a policy don't you? If you don't you should think about it. What would you do if someone brought you a set of VS Natty Gut and the string broke while you were stringing it? I tell the people that bring their own string, if it breaks while I am stringing it there is no charge but I will not replace the string.

Irvin

Irvin
08-26-2010, 08:53 AM
I am not sure what it is like in Ct or where in Ct you live but have you ever though of picking up and dropping off rackets as part of your service? I am not sure if you ahve the means to pickup and drop off. There are a lot of people that make an awful lot more than you are ever going to make stringing rackets. Do you think they want to spend an hour, or more, dropping off and picking up their racket, not to mention what it cost them to make two round trips? You could easily double your profit by adding pick up and delivery.

Irvin

Parker512
08-26-2010, 12:47 PM
^^ I agree with that you have to take into account the time it takes you to string the string, the cost of the string, and your time when you are charging for rackets.

For example, the string I least like to string is Forten Gear. The main and like fly paper and the cross string are very soft. It probably takes me 5 minutes longer to string the crosses in that racket. Mainly because you have to go slower when pulling the crosses over the mains. It takes me about 20 to string a racket not counted another 10 minutes of setup and admin. So let's just say it takes 20% more time. So for that string is I normally mark up a string by $10 for my time I will mark up that string $2 more.

But to get started start by advertising your strings and the price for each. Make sure that when someone brings you a set of string to string for them they know your policy on stringing their strings. You do have a policy don't you? If you don't you should think about it. What would you do if someone brought you a set of VS Natty Gut and the string broke while you were stringing it? I tell the people that bring their own string, if it breaks while I am stringing it there is no charge but I will not replace the string.

Irvin

This was just an idea of mine but yes i think thats a good idea about that policy though and if your raquet breaks during stringing its not my fault.

Parker512
08-26-2010, 12:49 PM
^^ I agree with that you have to take into account the time it takes you to string the string, the cost of the string, and your time when you are charging for rackets.

For example, the string I least like to string is Forten Gear. The main and like fly paper and the cross string are very soft. It probably takes me 5 minutes longer to string the crosses in that racket. Mainly because you have to go slower when pulling the crosses over the mains. It takes me about 20 to string a racket not counted another 10 minutes of setup and admin. So let's just say it takes 20% more time. So for that string is I normally mark up a string by $10 for my time I will mark up that string $2 more.

But to get started start by advertising your strings and the price for each. Make sure that when someone brings you a set of string to string for them they know your policy on stringing their strings. You do have a policy don't you? If you don't you should think about it. What would you do if someone brought you a set of VS Natty Gut and the string broke while you were stringing it? I tell the people that bring their own string, if it breaks while I am stringing it there is no charge but I will not replace the string.

Irvin

It would take me a long time beggining because ive never strung a raquet before but know how.

Parker512
08-26-2010, 12:51 PM
I am not sure what it is like in Ct or where in Ct you live but have you ever though of picking up and dropping off rackets as part of your service? I am not sure if you ahve the means to pickup and drop off. There are a lot of people that make an awful lot more than you are ever going to make stringing rackets. Do you think they want to spend an hour, or more, dropping off and picking up their racket, not to mention what it cost them to make two round trips? You could easily double your profit by adding pick up and delivery.

Irvin

I live in the tenth largest town in ct not by population but by size and theres only 6,000 people we dont even have a store. Houses are 500ft apart i cant drive because im 12 8th grade.

MAX PLY
08-26-2010, 01:04 PM
It would take me a long time beggining because ive never strung a raquet before but know how.

If this is true, then I don't think you should sell your services at all. You are not a stringer yet. Seriously, you really need to learn to string by stringing not by watching videos and you need a significant number of racquets under your belt before you offer your services to others. I do encourage you to learn to string and when you get reasonably proficient, then you can consider stringing commercially.

Parker512
08-26-2010, 01:08 PM
If this is true, then I don't think you should sell your services at all. You are not a stringer yet.

Thats why i wanted to have a electronic because it would make it easier.

mad dog1
08-26-2010, 01:45 PM
Thats why i wanted to have a electronic because it would make it easier.

electronic stringers don't make stringing any easier. they may make stringing a little faster once you know how to string. it's not as if an electronic stringing machine can string the racquet on it's own once you've mounted it. you still have to pull, clamp, and weave the string not to mention tie the knots.

Parker512
08-26-2010, 03:38 PM
electronic stringers don't make stringing any easier. they may make stringing a little faster once you know how to string. it's not as if an electronic stringing machine can string the racquet on it's own once you've mounted it. you still have to pull, clamp, and weave the string not to mention tie the knots.

Theres a button on a keypad i saw with a not on it whats that about. Also i only break strings like 3 to 2 times a year so i cant just string my raquet and learning because it would be a waste. Where would i then get raquets to practice on.

mad dog1
08-26-2010, 05:51 PM
Theres a button on a keypad i saw with a not on it whats that about. Also i only break strings like 3 to 2 times a year so i cant just string my raquet and learning because it would be a waste. Where would i then get raquets to practice on.

the "knot" button on the tension head is preset to pull tension a few lbs higher to offset for any tension loss from the slack taken up when you release tension on your knot. it doesn't tie the knot for you. you need to know what type of knot to use and technique to get a good, tight knot with minimal amount of slack. there's also some technique involved in clamping strings to minimize the drawback when you release tension.

you've got to practice, practice, practice. i recommend either buying a reel of cheap nylon and practicing on your sticks. if you don't want to practice on your sticks, pick up some cheap sticks from goodwill & practice on those.

jim e
08-26-2010, 08:38 PM
Theres a button on a keypad i saw with a not on it whats that about.

Some people like to increase the tension on the last strings that are tied off with the knot, to compensate for any tension loss due to drawback.This is a very controversal issue to say the least.Many stringers do increase tie offs, and many do not. Each have there own reasons for or against. My advise is whatever you decide on this, do it the same to be consistant.

To ans. your question on that button.
The knot button will increase the tension by 10% on most machines for only the very next tension pull only. This way when you get to the last tie off string, you hit the knot button (this increases the tension), then hit the tension button, and when the tension is pulled , you clamp, hit the tension button to release, then the tension sets back to the origional tension set on the machine.

Without a knot button ,if you decide to increase the tie off strings, you would have to manually increase the tension on the machines key pad, and then after you tie the knot you would have to remember to reset the machine back to the origional reference tension, as many stringers can have a tendency to forget to do that and ruin the string job because of that.
So it just makes the tie off increases more convenient if you decide to do that.

Irvin
08-27-2010, 04:00 AM
Thats why i wanted to have a electronic because it would make it easier.

Whether you lift a small weight, turn a crank, or push a button they are all pretty easy.

Irvin

GPB
08-27-2010, 05:28 AM
This was just an idea of mine but yes i think thats a good idea about that policy though and if your raquet breaks during stringing its not my fault.

Woah, hoss... if you break their racket stringing, it *could be* your fault. You have to inspect it first, checking for cracks and stuff. If it looks good, and you break it, guess who's pocket that comes out of? Yours.

But if you know what you're doing, you have nothing to worry about :)

jim e
08-27-2010, 11:06 AM
GPB is correct!
You string sloppy, and pull the 1st mains over the racquet when you should have gone under and marr up the racquet, your fault.
You mount the racquet wrong, it moves and scratches the racquet, or breaks racquet, your fault.
Your in a hurry and don't check over a mis handled racquet for fractures and you start to string it and it snaps the racquet, your fault for not noticing that fracture before you started the job.(Last 2 years, I have spotted 4 cracked racquets, that I never did string for the client).
You snap a $43.00 set of VS gut, because you failed to check the grommets for broken grommets, your fault.
You snap a $43.00 set of VS because you kink the string, sloppy with handling it, or it untwists on the last couple cross strings as you were not carefull weaving it, your fault.
You string a # certain racquets bottom up and snap the racquet, your fault.
When you take on the responsibility to string someone elses racquet for a fee, you also take on some responsibility along with that.
I'm sure there are many more your fault reasons, as these just came up to me now.
Even when it is not your fault, thare are times when you will string a racquet for no fee, just to keep a client happy.Like if they shank a ball, and snap a job that you just did a day earlier, you explain why this happened, so they understand, but to keep them happy, re string it for them the 1st time.
I'm sure a list can go on and on... You will see once you get going.

beernutz
08-27-2010, 11:32 AM
My $.02: Buy an inexpensive stringer (e.g., X-2, Klippermate, or String Pal) and string your own racquet many times before offering your services to the public for money. You can buy a reel of cheap nylon string, not to mention that some stringing machines come with free string, and use that to hone your skills. You can always string your racquet with nylon, cut it out, and string it again. You can also offer to string your friend's or family's racquets for free to get more stringing practice. Saying you know how to string when you have never strung a racquet in your life before is borderline hubris, imo.

Stinging isn't rocket science but its not walking and chewing gum either. Take your time and learn to do it right. Read this forum, stringforums.net, and check out YULitle's youtube videos http://www.youtube.com/user/YULitle?feature=chclk and PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. Then you can confidently present yourself as a stringer.

JZImmer123
09-25-2010, 05:53 PM
Theres a button on a keypad i saw with a not on it whats that about. Also i only break strings like 3 to 2 times a year so i cant just string my raquet and learning because it would be a waste. Where would i then get raquets to practice on.

Aww man, that would be awesome if the machine would actually tie the knot for you!

max
09-26-2010, 07:18 AM
good advice from beernutz.

Parker512
09-26-2010, 07:28 AM
This thread was'nt suppose to come back to life.

Stinkdyr
09-27-2010, 07:26 AM
Dude. Just buy a cheap, used machine, and dive right in.

I admire your young entrepreneurial spirit. Listen to the advice here, but don't let it daunt you. You will learn as you go.

Josh10s
09-27-2010, 08:14 AM
It is one thing to know how to string and another thing to have strung a racket. Just because you watch someone ride a bike or swim in a pool does not mean you can do it. Have you ever strung a racket before?

The reason I ask this question is because not everyone will enjoy stringing a racket. No matter how much fun it looks like it is, how easy you think it may be, and how much money you think you can make if you do not like stringing the pure and simple fact is you will not string.

So you pay a lot of money and your stringer ends up collecting rust in the garage or basement until your parents sell it on the weekend at the yard sale.

If that happens and you bought a $500 to $800 machine it is like throwing your money away. I am sure you can't afford to do that.

For your first stringer I would suggest buying a machine where you can make all your money back as soon as possible. If you spend over $200 you are spending too much. That way you make your money back in 15 to 20 string jobs. You will also find out what it is like to find player's rackets for stringing. You will find out what stringing other people's rackets really means. Not that any of your customers will ever be unsatisfied, but when you offer a service for pay there will be customer expectations. You will find out some of the time you usually enjoy playing tennis is now being spent on stringing rackets.

I would suggest a Gamma Progression (http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Gamma_Progression_200_Stringing_Machine_/descpageGAMMA-GP200.html) stringer. If you string 15 rackets and don't like it you could sell it for a profit becasue your 15 rackets paid for the stringer. If you find out later you want something better so you can string rackets faster with you can sell it for a profit to go toward a better stringer. What can you lose?

Irvin

These are all very important things to consider before buying your machine. Also before you start trying to string other peoples racquets you should really consider learning how to grip. A professional (and if you are trying to get paid to do it you are claimimg to be) needs to be able to offer that and other basic services to their customers. The more professional you come across the more likely they are to let you service their racquets. Also the more professional you look the more they will be willing to pay.

In my area there is a lot of home stringing competition. I have been able to charge more than my competition because I am not trying to do it at the lowest cost in town. I am able to charge more because I am a MRT, and know my stuff. It doesn't sound like you have a lot of competition, but what is there is professional. You need to offer better service, not just lower prices.

Good luck!

g.hull
10-03-2010, 02:48 PM
why are you charging so much more for hybrids?

Parker512
10-03-2010, 02:55 PM
why are you charging so much more for hybrids?

who are you talking to?