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View Full Version : Since Andy Roddick Uses A Pd+, We Should All Use Os Racquets.


ktncnttl
05-29-2005, 03:59 AM
Anyone here can generate more racquet speed than Andy Roddick or Nadal? Anyone here has more power than Moya? If they choose use a "powerful" racquet like a PD, shouldn't the mortals, with much less power, use an even more powerful racquet?

Marius_Hancu
05-29-2005, 04:25 AM
you might want to check this first about pd+ and similarly harsh rackets:

Sharp pains in the hand, wrist and lower wrist
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=418381

Grimjack
05-29-2005, 05:50 AM
Bear in mind also that these three guys are capable of hitting with otherworldly amounts of topspin; that allows them to harness the power inherent in those frames.

And, being at the top of the pro level, they consistently walk that razor's edge that separates a blistered 1000+ rpm forehand deep in the court from the well-spun shot that falls too short, or the not-as-heavily-spun shot that takes the racquet's natural power and drops it beyond the baseline. Even if your mechanics are otherwise good, these too-deep, not-quite-pro-heavy strokes will produce better results with a less powerful frame.

goober
05-29-2005, 06:04 AM
Anyone here can generate more racquet speed than Andy Roddick or Nadal? Anyone here has more power than Moya? If they choose use a "powerful" racquet like a PD, shouldn't the mortals, with much less power, use an even more powerful racquet?

Based on your insightful analysis I am going to switch the Weed Z-ONE35.

Rafa Nadal
05-29-2005, 06:27 AM
@ktncnttl
Nadal dont generate so much racquet speed but a lot of spin, i knew a few guys which generate racquet speed like Nadal, when you would give Nadal for example a NCode Tour 90, then he wouldnt have the half of power like with the Babolat

wildmoose31
05-29-2005, 07:47 AM
Based on your insightful analysis I am going to switch the Weed Z-ONE35.
exactly, with this ones logic people not in the top 20 should be using 110, and amateurs shouldnt be using anything under 120

kv581
05-29-2005, 08:00 AM
@ktncnttl
Nadal dont generate so much racquet speed but a lot of spin, i knew a few guys which generate racquet speed like Nadal, when you would give Nadal for example a NCode Tour 90, then he wouldnt have the half of power like with the Babolat
Spin is ALL about the racquet speed. Take Kuerten and his prestige 18X20 pattern.

tom4ny
05-29-2005, 08:15 AM
having the good fortune to see them up close and live at each US Open, i'd say it's racquet speed and form. what these guys do is amazing.

Michelangelo
05-29-2005, 08:19 AM
Power is an important aspect of modern tennis games, but not everything. That's why we have Sampras, Federer and so forth. Also being able to understand what your rackets can and cannot do, as well as if it matches your playing style are also critical to your game.

Safina
05-29-2005, 09:48 AM
Although the initial post took a decent thought to its most irrational extreme... I do think that there is a macho-USA tendency to hold on to 90" 12.6oz frames as the best, when a lot of players, even very good players, might be better suited to 100" 11 oz frames.

I do think the style of game you play sort of dictates what kind of racquet is best... and I have been crushed by players using 85" frames and 110" frames.

But I do think the majority of US 3.0-3.5 players would be better off as a whole if we learned to embrace the power and topspin potential of the tweener segment. That being said, the feel and crispness of hitting with a classic racquet is also good enough reason for me to continue playing it until I find the right replacement.

When I play weak opponents, my 88" frame seems perfect. I get aces, and can get into the net and finish off points quickly. Playing against better opponents though, when my serves start coming back with Nadal-like heavy topspin that seems to accelerate after hitting the basline, my racquet starts to feel like a weakness. I feel like I am always going to be the one to hit a short ball first and then I am going to be on the defensive the rest of the point. My racquet itself is turning me into a counter-puncher at best.
I feel like with a slightly larger racquet, I could go on offense much easier.
Of course this is all solvable with more training and better technique.

As you can see I have not decided which way to go yet... to practice more often with my current stick, or to switch to a more powerful frame which will lead me to learn how to keep the ball IN with spin instead of practicing getting the ball deeper. Just different things to work on!

goober
05-29-2005, 09:58 AM
I think this "macho" tendency is on this board. I rarely see people at clubs even those playing 4.5-5.0 level using 85-90 inch racquets. There has been only a handful that I can remember. If anything there is an excessive tendency for people to use oversized granny sticks especially on the 3.0-3.5 levels.

Rafa Nadal
05-29-2005, 10:47 AM
@goober
I am a 3,5 player, i used the NCOde Tour 90 for a few weeks, it works, its hard, but it works

snowpuppy
05-30-2005, 06:20 AM
hey, if old school players can learn to play using woodies w/ > 90 sq in heads, we call all do it too. Plus the lighter the racquet the more shock you will probably feel cuz there is no weight behind the shot. This fact especially hurt the "macho" beginner that takes HUGE cuts at the ball and not have it land on the sweet spot.

AndrewD
05-30-2005, 06:52 AM
As an 'old school player' who learnt using a wooden frame (is 31 really that old?) I know that Im learning a whole new assortment of shots using the current technology and larger headed frames.I also know that playing guys who use larger, more powerful racquets makes it harder to compete, even if you have better technique etc. Power in your biggest first serve with a smaller headed, low power frame and watch the ball come back when they just stick out that powerful modern racquet. Hit a follow up drive and see them, once again, just stick out their racquet, flick the wrist and pop it back. Damn frustrating and that's not even mentioning the lob LOL. For most players, adopting the newer technology (which means headsizes larger than 90) allows us to open up the court in a way the old frames never could (unless your name was Laver, Hoad, Sampras or Federer). Its the best way to counter that kind of play, not to mention competing against your peers who are hitting the ball harder and heavier than they did with the old frames.

I wouldn't advocate going to an oversize, uber powerful frame (that will compromise your game too much) but, instead, shifting to something in the mid range in terms of headsize and power. Ive been using a Head Prestige mid as the smaller headsize was a bit more gentle on my wrist as I recovered from injury. However, now the wrist is fine, Im ready to go to something that makes life just that little bit easier.

As a serve-volley player in a world of baseline-bashers I know that, for my style, the playing field isn't level. So, whatever allows me to compete at my best is more than welcome.

tom4ny
05-30-2005, 07:22 AM
amen andrewD

ktncnttl
05-30-2005, 05:15 PM
As an 'old school player' who learnt using a wooden frame (is 31 really that old?) I know that Im learning a whole new assortment of shots using the current technology and larger headed frames.I also know that playing guys who use larger, more powerful racquets makes it harder to compete, even if you have better technique etc. Power in your biggest first serve with a smaller headed, low power frame and watch the ball come back when they just stick out that powerful modern racquet. Hit a follow up drive and see them, once again, just stick out their racquet, flick the wrist and pop it back. Damn frustrating and that's not even mentioning the lob LOL. For most players, adopting the newer technology (which means headsizes larger than 90) allows us to open up the court in a way the old frames never could (unless your name was Laver, Hoad, Sampras or Federer). Its the best way to counter that kind of play, not to mention competing against your peers who are hitting the ball harder and heavier than they did with the old frames.

I wouldn't advocate going to an oversize, uber powerful frame (that will compromise your game too much) but, instead, shifting to something in the mid range in terms of headsize and power. Ive been using a Head Prestige mid as the smaller headsize was a bit more gentle on my wrist as I recovered from injury. However, now the wrist is fine, Im ready to go to something that makes life just that little bit easier.

As a serve-volley player in a world of baseline-bashers I know that, for my style, the playing field isn't level. So, whatever allows me to compete at my best is more than welcome.

I cant agree more.