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View Full Version : How many crosses do you weave ahead before pulling the tension?


BlueTennis
08-27-2010, 09:39 AM
I'll usually go ahead 3-4 crosses before pulling the tension on each of them.

jim e
08-27-2010, 09:48 AM
I'll usually go ahead 3-4 crosses before pulling the tension on each of them.

I just string one ahead. This way the weaving is easier, as they are all soft weaves,( going over a lower main and under a higher main). I also pull (fan)most of the strings slack one ahead as well, as it is easier on the string.
Do whatever is easier for you, but weaving soft weaves is easier for me.

rich s
08-27-2010, 09:49 AM
1 ahead..........

drakulie
08-27-2010, 10:25 AM
Depends. On some synthetics, I weave ahead until the string runs out. Here is a video I completed on the process:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_IEP7reQaQ

WildVolley
08-27-2010, 02:14 PM
Depends. On some synthetics, I weave ahead until the string runs out. Here is a video I completed on the process:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_IEP7reQaQ

How much time does that save you as compared to stringing one ahead?

Virtua Tennis
08-27-2010, 06:43 PM
How much time does that save you as compared to stringing one ahead?

It doesn't save you anytime at all. Actually your more likely to scratch up the string or knick it.

drakulie
08-27-2010, 08:54 PM
How much time does that save you as compared to stringing one ahead?

I have never noted a big difference in this method or just completing one ahead in relation to time. Sometimes I'm a bit faster with this method because I get into a better rythm. Also, it helps gettting as much string off the floor, and the string becomes less tangled.

It doesn't save you anytime at all. Actually your more likely to scratch up the string or knick it.

Care to elaborate??? Not once have I scratched the string or knicked it using this method. To the contrary, wihen working with most of the string on the floor, it is more likely to get kinked or strained due to feet stepping on it, spinning the frame and the string getting caught on something, etc.

dancraig
08-27-2010, 11:42 PM
Many times, depending on racquet and string, I weave "several ahead". I start with my "one ahead" in place and then push weave a cross and then pull weave the next cross back toward me. No need to spin the racquet. Push a cross and then pull a cross. The return pull is the hard weave, so that seems to work out. I do as many as feels appropriate, leaving a loop of string at the ends for pulling tension. When I start tensioning, I leave the last cross untensioned so that I start weaving a new section with a "one ahead" in place. I fan the crosses, as usual, when using this method.
I like it. I'm not sure it saves much time, but after years of stringing it breaks the monotony and gives a fresh approach to the process.
Like drakulie alludes, if you're going to weave - then weave.

Virtua Tennis
08-28-2010, 04:37 AM
I have never noted a big difference in this method or just completing one ahead in relation to time. Sometimes I'm a bit faster with this method because I get into a better rythm. Also, it helps gettting as much string off the floor, and the string becomes less tangled.



Care to elaborate??? Not once have I scratched the string or knicked it using this method. To the contrary, wihen working with most of the string on the floor, it is more likely to get kinked or strained due to feet stepping on it, spinning the frame and the string getting caught on something, etc.

The distance you have to distribute the friction is shorter you're more likely to scratch the string

drakulie
08-28-2010, 05:15 AM
The distance you have to distribute the friction is shorter you're more likely to scratch the string

I'm assuming you mean, "burn" the string (specifically the mains).

If this is what you mean, then you have obviously had personal experience with this problem, and most likely, the cause of burning the string was pilot error, not the procedure itself.

struggle
08-30-2010, 10:19 AM
1 ahead for me, usually but not always.