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indyfob2008
09-04-2010, 10:33 AM
I watched 2 videos on y,o,u,t,u,b,e - Drakulie using a starting clamp vs. YULitle's method:

http://www.youtube.com/user/drakulie#p/u/4/H4TpCdIJHeM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NDlkeJ5E4U

I'd like to hear people's thoughts - which method do you prefer? Is one better than the other? What would you recommend to a future stringer?

(ordered a Alpha Revo 400)

Ash_Smith
09-04-2010, 11:22 AM
The method I was taught is the UKRSA way-which is the same (I think) as the Yusuki method (described in a previous thread). It's a good way to ensure you get proper tension on both centre mains.

As for the two vids you show, both are fine, the Yusuki method is closer to Yulitles as both mains are pulled initially, but either method will work no problem at all so I would recommend you try both styles and see what fits with you best!

Ash

Irvin
09-04-2010, 01:39 PM
For just starting the mains I prefer the method that 'YULitle' used and no starting clamp. If you look close at the way the strings were started with the starting clamp the grommet was smashed a little. It may rebound irght but but why do it to begin with. If there was some type of spacer with a hole large enough to protect the grommet I can't see much difference. Find a racket with some old brittle grommet and they are gone on the first pull.

Irvin

jim e
09-04-2010, 05:33 PM
I like the Yusuki Method of starting mains.
I have been using this way for about a year now. It was described in the Sept.2009 issue of RSI magazine which can be obtained on the USRSA web site. After I read that article I started using that method.
Before that, I would start similar to Yulitles method, except I would string 2 mains on one side 1st, then go to the other side, this way there is enough room to place both machines fixed clamps next to each other, and be right up to the inside of the frame of the racquet, as I do not like to have the machines clamp away from the frame like some do,(staggering the machines clamps), as the next pull places stress on the string pulling it around 2 grommets, and the tension will not totally be pulled out with those couple inches.
With this technique (Yusuki), when you release the tension head, there is enough tension to hold both clamps in place, you don't have to put the 1st clamp on a limp string, and the 1st clamp does not take all the force of the 1st pull by itself.It's a real nice way to start mains.
Below is a link to that article for those who may wish to try it out.
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/articles/2009/09/the_yusuki_method_of_starting.html

indyfob2008
09-04-2010, 06:08 PM
thanks for the link and thanks for telling me about the Yusuki method. can't wait for my Alpha Revo 4000!

drakulie
09-04-2010, 07:46 PM
From my experience, none of the methods are better or worse than the others (including the Yusuki method). I've tried all 3, and always get the same DT at the end of the string job. Just a matter of which one you feel is best for you.

star 5 15
09-04-2010, 07:52 PM
From my experience, none of the methods are better or worse than the others (including the Yusuki method). I've tried all 3, and always get the same DT at the end of the string job. Just a matter of which one you feel is best for you.

I use a similar method as to what Drak uses. I put the starting clamp in the same place and pull directly against it. I however though place a piece of leather up against the frame between it and the starting clamp to take pressure off the frame at the site of the clamp. I believe I saw Roman prokes use this same method in a video. Except he doubles up on the starting clamps. I don't do that but I've never had anything slip with the babolat starters.

Virtua Tennis
09-04-2010, 11:39 PM
Not a fan of Yulittle's method I've seen people who don't have tight clamps or properly adjusted clamps strip the string when pulled. Also I use the Wilson Baiardo so the method doesn't work well when the clamp keep unlocking the base.

Not big on drakulie method of putting the starting clamp on the inside of the frame where there's a chance of scratching the frame.

I do use a starting clamp but I use it on the outside of the frame right against the bumper guard.

Irvin
09-05-2010, 03:48 AM
I am not a big fan of the Yusuki method although it seems to be a good mehtod. With my stringer there is not much room to put the starting clamp in so the handle goes down out of the way it must stick up. Also many frames are painted in the throat area and you need to put something in to keep the paint from chipping.

Irvin

uk_skippy
09-05-2010, 04:01 AM
I use a similar method as to what Drak uses. I put the starting clamp in the same place and pull directly against it. I however though place a piece of leather up against the frame between it and the starting clamp to take pressure off the frame at the site of the clamp. I believe I saw Roman prokes use this same method in a video. Except he doubles up on the starting clamps. I don't do that but I've never had anything slip with the babolat starters.

I also use this method, and also use a leather pad against the frame. This will protect both the grommets, and the frame from being damaged.

.....Find a racket with some old brittle grommet and they are gone on the first pull.

If the grommets were that brittle to start with I'd be replacing them. It would be likely that other grommets would be brittle or damaged.

Regards

Paul

Irvin
09-05-2010, 04:05 AM
...
If the grommets were that brittle to start with I'd be replacing them. It would be likely that other grommets would be brittle or damaged.

Regards

Paul

That would be an excellent idea if you could get the grommets and if the customer wanted to pay to have new ones.

Irvin

jim e
09-05-2010, 08:04 AM
Also many frames are painted in the throat area and you need to put something in to keep the paint from chipping.

Irvin

Properly using a starting clamp will not chip the paint. You just need to be careful is all.I guess if you are in a rush, and attempting to beat the clock like many on these boards seem to do, then I guess you can get sloppy and chip paint, kink the strings and do all sorts of improper things.
A use of a starting clamp will not cause ant damage if used carefully enough.

Irvin
09-05-2010, 08:25 AM
^^ Any time I use a starting clamp I poke a hole in a piece of business card (cut into 8 pieces) and put my string through it. That will offer protection against the paint but not protect the grommet any.

Irvin

gotwheels
09-05-2010, 08:47 AM
uk_skippy, I am a fan of your method of starting mains and have used it for years with never an issue. It is easy, simple, and efficient. Thanks for sharing the technique.

I appreciate and am always enlightened with your posts/comments.

uk_skippy
09-05-2010, 11:07 AM
That would be an excellent idea if you could get the grommets and if the customer wanted to pay to have new ones.

Irvin

If you received a rqt which had brittle grommets, notwithstanding the current thread, what would you do? String as is and risk the grommet degrading, cutting in the string and breaking it prematurely? Tube it or replace it with an individual grommet ala the fittex system? Or contact the customer and advise on a replacement grommet strip (if still available)?

To be honest, if the grommets were brittle chances are the frame is quite old and getting the grommet strip is unlikely, so you'd have to improvise with loose grommets and/or tubing. Either way I'd be addressing this problem, although it shouldn't affect the way I start the mains.

Properly using a starting clamp will not chip the paint. You just need to be careful is all.I guess if you are in a rush, and attempting to beat the clock like many on these boards seem to do, then I guess you can get sloppy and chip paint, kink the strings and do all sorts of improper things.
A use of a starting clamp will not cause ant damage if used carefully enough.

Agreed. If fact Babolat should the way to use only a starting clamp when starting the mains in their video which came out for the maintenance of the Star 3 & 4.

^^ Any time I use a starting clamp I poke a hole in a piece of business card (cut into 8 pieces) and put my string through it. That will offer protection against the paint but not protect the grommet any.

Irvin

As previous mentioned, I use a leather pad to protect both the frame and grommet. Using this method I have NEVER damaged any grommets, not scratched a frame. The only way I can see the clamp damaging the grommet is if the clamp is put directly onto the grommet.

If I felt that this method is detrimental to the integrity to the string, grommet or frame then I would change. At the moment I see no evidence to suggest that I need to reconsider changing.

uk_skippy, I am a fan of your method of starting mains and have used it for years with never an issue. It is easy, simple, and efficient. Thanks for sharing the technique.

I appreciate and am always enlightened with your posts/comments.

Thanks for the comment, much appreciated.

Regards

Paul

Rabbit
09-06-2010, 04:39 PM
Hmmm...well I do something different from either of those. I clamp the first main and put a starting clamp behind that clamp. I then string the first two mains on the opposite side.

Then, I pull tension on the double clamped main, release tension from the starting clamp, move the fixed clamp down the length of the string and then pull the next main on that side. The benefit is that I don't have either fixed clamp set too tightly to hold.

It works for me.

indyfob2008
09-06-2010, 06:09 PM
Hmmm...well I do something different from either of those. I clamp the first main and put a starting clamp behind that clamp. I then string the first two mains on the opposite side.

Then, I pull tension on the double clamped main, release tension from the starting clamp, move the fixed clamp down the length of the string and then pull the next main on that side. The benefit is that I don't have either fixed clamp set too tightly to hold.

It works for me.

I didn't know there were so many different "startin mains" methods. This thread made my life a little bit more complicated as I will receive my machine in a couple days...

jim e
09-06-2010, 06:18 PM
I didn't know there were so many different "startin mains" methods. This thread made my life a little bit more complicated as I will receive my machine in a couple days...

Should not be more complicated, as you see they all work, and this will give you a chance over time to try them each out and see what you may like. End results are same, just different techniques to get you there. Have fun along the way!!There are more different points of views more controversal than this to be sure. Good luck!

Rabbit
09-06-2010, 07:43 PM
I didn't know there were so many different "startin mains" methods. This thread made my life a little bit more complicated as I will receive my machine in a couple days...


I agree, as usual, with jim_e. The whole deal is to do something you're comfortable with that will allow you to replicate results time and time again. In my case, I try to keep my clamps as loose as possible. But, when pulling the first main, there is slippage unless you tighten it down (or have diamond dusted clamps). So, I did some reading and tried both ways mentioned in video, and arrived at this solution which is the easiest for me.

Have fun with your new stringer. Just remember that the key word is "consistency".

Ash_Smith
09-07-2010, 12:20 AM
I didn't know there were so many different "startin mains" methods. This thread made my life a little bit more complicated as I will receive my machine in a couple days...

Substitute "complicated" for "fun" an you're nearer the mark :)

As you have probably noticed by now, we stringers are a funny and slightly obsessive bunch (geeks basically!) - for reference see the 4 page thread discussing how to tie the same knot in a thousand varied ways!!! The fun part comes from trying different methods and techniques and seeing what fits for you and your machine. I've changed my habits over the years by trying things i've read on here from guys like jim, irv, drak, yulitle, paul skipp and many others and i've also discarded many things i've tried too!

The beauty of having your own machine is being able to experiment!

Ash

indyfob2008
09-07-2010, 05:46 AM
Substitute "complicated" for "fun" an you're nearer the mark :)

As you have probably noticed by now, we stringers are a funny and slightly obsessive bunch (geeks basically!) - for reference see the 4 page thread discussing how to tie the same knot in a thousand varied ways!!! The fun part comes from trying different methods and techniques and seeing what fits for you and your machine. I've changed my habits over the years by trying things i've read on here from guys like jim, irv, drak, yulitle, paul skipp and many others and i've also discarded many things i've tried too!

The beauty of having your own machine is being able to experiment!

Ash
right on! I agree that "fun" is a more appropriate word than "complicated". Thanks everyone for the feedback. I enjoyed reading all the posts, but it would be even cooler if there were some more videos showing all the different ways you can start the mains...I too am an "obsessive geek" - which probably is the more modest term for those who enjoy the journey and process of learning then mastering new things in life. it's great to read the thoughts of so many "geeks" in T.T.

drakulie
09-07-2010, 06:37 AM
If the grommets were that brittle to start with I'd be replacing them. It would be likely that other grommets would be brittle or damaged.

Regards

Paul

Agree. I've never run into any sort of problem using the method. If grommets are that bad, then they would need replacing anyhow. I've never cracked/damaged a grommet or left a racquet with a paint chip as some are implying would happen if using this method.

Additionally, as you pointed out, Babolat even advises to start the mains this way when using the starting clamp.

Bottom line is, all the methods mentioned work. Just a matter of what one feels most comfortable with.

Irvin
09-07-2010, 07:37 AM
Agree. I've never run into any sort of problem using the method. If grommets are that bad, then they would need replacing anyhow. I've never cracked/damaged a grommet or left a racquet with a paint chip as some are implying would happen if using this method.

Additionally, as you pointed out, Babolat even advises to start the mains this way when using the starting clamp.

Bottom line is, all the methods mentioned work. Just a matter of what one feels most comfortable with.

I beg your pardon I did not say it would happen I emplied it could happen. There is a big difference. I speed, but I have never had an accident. Does that mean that since I have never had an accident it is ok to speed? If so I want my money back. LMAO

Here is my take on this. I would not use a method that smashes a grommet or puts metal against paint. Sounds to me like an accident waiting to happen. No matter who suggests I do it, not even the racket stringers association of the world.

Irvin

jim e
09-07-2010, 07:44 AM
not even the racket stringers association of the world.

Irvin

Do they have a web site?

Irvin
09-07-2010, 07:52 AM
http://www.wrsa.com/

Irvin

drakulie
09-07-2010, 07:53 AM
I beg your pardon I did not say it would happen I emplied it could happen. There is a big difference.

I didn't direct my comment towards you.


I would not use a method that smashes a grommet or puts metal against paint.

If you do the procedure corrrectly, then:


you won't "smash" the grommet, and
won't put the "metal against paint".
And, like I said, use the procedure that works best for you, regardless of the source (poster, USRSA, UKRSA, Top Pro Stringer, etc).

Irvin
09-07-2010, 08:05 AM
^^ Hummm? OK lets take the head racket in your video.

http://www.youtube.com/user/drakulie#p/u/4/H4TpCdIJHeM

Since you started at the head that means 1T and 2T are connected by a loop of string on the outside of the frame. So you are pulling against the string on 2T with the metal starting clamp on one side (inside the frame) and the string (first right main) being pulled under tension on the other side. Does this not smash the grommet? When that grommet is smashed does the metal starting clamp not rest up against paint? BTW if you started at the throat I would have the same issue.

Irvin

drakulie
09-07-2010, 08:14 AM
NO. The grommet is not smashed, nor is the paint chipped. If this were the case, I wouldn't be stringing this frame every week, unless I had a ton of extra throat grommets, for this frame or anyone else frames I string.

Irvin
09-07-2010, 08:21 AM
So that grommet at 1:05 in your video is not up against the frame? Must be a strong grommet. I am not saying that every time you put metal against paint the the paint will lose but I just don't think it is safe. At least not with someone else's racket.

Irvin

drakulie
09-07-2010, 08:36 AM
Irvin, when one pulls the string, the grommet moves a slight bit inwards, therefore does not become "crushed". Also, the starting clamp does not rub on the paint.

All methods of starting a string job have their pros and cons. I have used at least 5-6 different methods. All result in the same DT, and all have something positive/something negative (depending on each person's point of view).

Irvin
09-07-2010, 08:44 AM
...
All methods of starting a string job have their pros and cons. I have used at least 5-6 different methods. All result in the same DT, and all have something positive/something negative (depending on each person's point of view).

Agree completely

Irvin

uk_skippy
09-07-2010, 08:45 AM
Frankly, if you don't like that method, then don't use it. Use the method that you feel works best for you, and that goes for all stringers.

I, like others, use this (or similar) method without problems. I've never damaged a grommet, nor chipped the paint of a frame using this method and I've strung for local weekend hackers to top, top pros.

As mentioned before, unless I'm shown suitable evidence, or can be persuaded otherwise, I will continue to use this method.

As C.J. from Sunshine Desserts often says "I didn't get where I am today........"

Power Player
09-07-2010, 10:52 AM
I have the worst method of starting the mains. I hand pull them through the starting grommets then clamp the 2 middle strings. I then tension the long side which is strung through the frame an extra time. I sucked at yusaki and stripped the string when I did it, so I can't use that. I was told my method by Mark at Gamma, and I like his advice even though I am not sure if it is the best way to do it.

I have an alpha string pal. I would like to try Drak's way, but I think he is clamping one string at a time, and I do not know if my flying stringway clamps can do that.

Irvin
09-07-2010, 04:47 PM
^^ If you have a starting clamp I am not sure why the Yusuki method would not work for you. Do you have a starting clamp or did you use a flying clamp for a starting clamp?

Irvin

Power Player
09-07-2010, 07:36 PM
I use a flying clamp, but I also own a starting clamp. The double pull of the strings is what does not really work for me. I know it works for topalengo who has the same machine, but I have not had the same luck.

Irvin
09-08-2010, 03:25 AM
^^ if you have a starting clamp there is no need to double pull. I am not sure if you are talking about starting the mains or the crosses using the double pulling.

Maybe we have a different concept of what double pulling is. When two strings are pulled to set the tension in the clamp I do not consider that double pulling since I am not pulling tension on a string. Such as when I pull 1RM and 1LM and set a clamp as far from the tension head as I can. When the tension is released all tension is gone. But if I were to clamp 1RM at the top of the racket and pull tension on 1LM to clamp at the top of the racket I am double pulling. I am effectively pulling tension on 1LM and 1RM at the same time. But using this method because of the friction of the bend connecting 1LM and 1RM I don't think you get full tension on each main.

Irvin

Power Player
09-08-2010, 05:27 AM
Ok. I meant pulling both strings at once to start the mains. So if that does not have to happen, my other question is if I can clamp just 1 string with my flying clamps. Because I did not think that worked, and I thought you had to clamp 2 at a time.

Irvin
09-08-2010, 08:31 AM
^^ Normallly that is not possible with flying clamps but it can be done. Look at this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KO9qWaom4cg

To start the mains initially if you can not pull two strings at one time with your stringer just pull them hard by hand before you set your top clamp. The main idea is you want some tension in the clamp to keep the strings straight through the clamp.

Irvin

Wolfy950
09-08-2010, 09:29 AM
If you pull two strings at the same time, each will only have one-half of the tension that you set on your tension head. Basic physics.

That is, if you set your tension head at 60 lbs and pull two strings, each will have only 30 lbs of tension. Do you compensate for this?

Irvin
09-08-2010, 09:38 AM
^^ Absolutely. Initially I pull two string just to set the clamp on the string. Then each string is pulled again to set tension before clamping on the other end.

Irvin

decades
09-08-2010, 09:51 AM
I have a neos and have a plastic throat piece. this prevents me from using a starting clamp on the inside throat of the frame correct? or do I put it up against the throat insert?

Power Player
09-08-2010, 10:24 AM
^^ Normallly that is not possible with flying clamps but it can be done. Look at this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KO9qWaom4cg

To start the mains initially if you can not pull two strings at one time with your stringer just pull them hard by hand before you set your top clamp. The main idea is you want some tension in the clamp to keep the strings straight through the clamp.

Irvin

Thanks Irvin. That makes sense. Now from that video, what I could also do is clamp that shortside string with a starting clamp instead of the flying clamp yulitle is using, correct?

topanlego
09-08-2010, 10:59 AM
^^ If you have a starting clamp I am not sure why the Yusuki method would not work for you. Do you have a starting clamp or did you use a flying clamp for a starting clamp?

Irvin

Simple reason... the Yusuki method ONLY works for FIXED clamp. Not flying clamps that are used with the String Pal.

I had mentioned this in the Yusuki thread a while back but everybody was getting confused.

again.. the YUSUKI method only works with Fixed Clamps. Those with fixed clamps with single action release, where the base releases when the clamp drops down, will benefit the most from this method. By holding some tension in between the machine clamp and the starting clamp, it prevents the machine clamp from dropping down there releasing the clamp base.

if you have FLYING clamps, please refer to YuLitle's video if you don't want to double pull to start the mains. If you don't mind, you can just follow any of the instructions available for flying clamps such as the ones on Silent Partner's site.

GPB
09-08-2010, 11:01 AM
Thanks Irvin. That makes sense. Now from that video, what I could also do is clamp that shortside string with a starting clamp instead of the flying clamp yulitle is using, correct?
Yes, that's how I learned to do it, with flying clamps and one starting clamp.

Irvin
09-08-2010, 12:01 PM
Simple reason... the Yusuki method ONLY works for FIXED clamp. Not flying clamps that are used with the String Pal.

I had mentioned this in the Yusuki thread a while back but everybody was getting confused.

again.. the YUSUKI method only works with Fixed Clamps. Those with fixed clamps with single action release, where the base releases when the clamp drops down, will benefit the most from this method. By holding some tension in between the machine clamp and the starting clamp, it prevents the machine clamp from dropping down there releasing the clamp base...

The Yusuki method may not work with certain stringers but it will surely work with flying or floating clamps.

Irvin

topanlego
09-08-2010, 01:25 PM
The Yusuki method may not work with certain stringers but it will surely work with flying or floating clamps.

Irvin

In that case, it will work with all stringers unless you can't put 2 stings into the gripper at once.

Must be user error or misunderstanding of the method. The original article includes a picture of a fixed clamp machine which can cause confusion as it only clamps 1 string instead of both when using flying clamps.

Power Player
09-08-2010, 01:41 PM
Yes, Drak's video was clearly done with fixed clamps on one string.

So for drop weight people like me :

String mains through first 2 main grommets (top through bottom or opposite depending on racquet).

Pull tightly with hands or double pull with clamp.

Clamp away from the tensioner (for me the top hoop, since I start the strings from the top) with a flying clamp.

Pull one main. Put starting clamp on that main outside of the hoop.

Pull second main. Take flying clamp from top of hoop and clamp both main strings.

Take same string and thread it through the opposite side, then pull tension.

Take clamp off of 2 mains and clamp the long side.

Stay on the long side and thread it to the opposite side and pull tension. Then clamp.

Pull tension on the string with the starting clamp on it. Release the starting clamp. Take your 2nd flying clamp and clamp it inside the hoop as normal.

Go from there.

Is this correct?

Cfidave
09-08-2010, 01:52 PM
I have a neos and have a plastic throat piece. this prevents me from using a starting clamp on the inside throat of the frame correct? or do I put it up against the throat insert?

You are correct. Almost impossible to put a starting clamp inside the throat area on the Neos/Ektelon stringer, without damaging something . Use the Yusuki method, starting clamp between outside of racquet and tension head, works much better for the Neos.

Irvin
09-08-2010, 02:22 PM
In that case, it will work with all stringers unless you can't put 2 stings into the gripper at once.

Must be user error or misunderstanding of the method. The original article includes a picture of a fixed clamp machine which can cause confusion as it only clamps 1 string instead of both when using flying clamps.

The Yusuki method pulls tension on the first two mains at the same time and you put your clamp as far from the tension head as you can inside the frame. You also place a starting clamp on the outside of the frame to back up the clamp on the other end of the string. It is described well here:

http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/articles/2009/09/the_yusuki_method_of_starting.html

If you would like to see a video using flying clamps I am stringing a couple of rackets now and I can do that for you.

Irvin

topanlego
09-08-2010, 03:03 PM
The Yusuki method pulls tension on the first two mains at the same time and you put your clamp as far from the tension head as you can inside the frame. You also place a starting clamp on the outside of the frame to back up the clamp on the other end of the string. It is described well here:

http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/articles/2009/09/the_yusuki_method_of_starting.html

If you would like to see a video using flying clamps I am stringing a couple of rackets now and I can do that for you.

Irvin

Not necessary as your video will be the same as YuLitle's except that you don't pull tension on the main with the starting clamp.

topanlego
09-08-2010, 03:41 PM
Is this correct?

It's is correct but I wouldn't pull the first 2 mains by hand or with a clamp.

IMO, Drak's method from his video won't work with flying clamps as you need to clamp 2 strings to hold tension.

To clear up the instructions for everybody:

Assuming the follwing:
- L1 = main on left side
- R1 = main on right side.
- the tensioner can pull 2 strings at once.

Follow YuLitle's video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KO9qWaom4cg)you get the following:

Clamps needed: 2 x Flying Clamps; Note that a starting clamp can be used but is not necessary.

1. Feed L1 R1
2. Tension L1 & R1 at same time and clamp with flying clamp furthest away from tensioner. (this sets the tension inside the clamps)
3. Tension R1 and set starting clamp outside frame. (Note: YuLitle uses a Flying Clamp in place of the starting clamp)
4. Tension L1 and clamp L1 & R1 using same flying clamp from Step 2 closest to tensioner.
5. Feed L2, tension and clamp.
6. Feed L3, tension and clamp.
7. Tension R1 and remove starting clamp. Clamp with 2nd flying clamp closet to tensioner.
8. Continue mains until finished.

You can also use the YUSUKI method:

Clamps needed: 2 x Flying Clamps, 1 x Starting Clamp

1. Feed L1 R1
2. Tension L1 & R1 at same time and clamp with flying clamp furthest away from tensioner and set starting clamp on R1 outside of frame.(this sets the tension inside the clamps)
3. Tension L1 and clamp L1 & R1 using 2nd flying clamp closest to tensioner.
4. Feed L2, tension and clamp.
5. Feed L3, tension and clamp.
6. Tension R1, remove starting clamp and clamp with 1st starting clamp.
7. Continue mains until finished.

With the Yusuki method, you must have a starting clamp as both flying clamps need to be used at the same time.

Irvin
09-08-2010, 04:47 PM
...
Is this correct?

Yes what you said was correct except when you pull the first two mains by hand you are not pulling to set tension in the clamp you just want the two mains straight through the clamp. Also when clamping only one string with flying clamps they need to be adjusted for just one string. Best bet is to get a starting clamp.

Irvin

Power Player
09-08-2010, 05:15 PM
Irvin and Top, thanks. I do intend to use the starting clamp and not the flying clamp. I already use the starting clamp to start crosses, so this should be easy.

Irvin, since I am not setting tension inside the clamps by pulling both mains in the gripper, am I still good to go with the instructions I posted?

It seems like I may be on way to setting the tension better in my mains.

Irvin
09-09-2010, 04:09 AM
^^ Yes I am sure you have the idea.

Irvin

Power Player
09-09-2010, 12:04 PM
Thanks guys, this thread has really helped me improve my stringing.

Power Player
09-15-2010, 05:08 PM
Ok, I did this method and it worked out for me quite well.

One more question : The racquet I strung starts at the bottom. When I used the starting clamp it was clamped to the string outside the frame. It seemed a little sketchy pulling tension on that clamped string since the clamp is so close to the tension head. Seemed like it was stretching the string real tight and it would snap, but it obviously did not. Once I pulled the tension I released the starting clamp and put on a flying one inside the frame and went on. It worked just fine, but pulling that string with the starting clamp attached just seemed a little hairy. Nothing to worry about?

Irvin
09-16-2010, 04:03 AM
Nothing to worry about.

Irvin

iebro
09-16-2010, 06:29 AM
maybe you should have a tension test after finish the stringing.
I think it is not useful for badminton,but may be it is useful for tennis.
http://www.iebro.com/link/machine/meter.jpg

iebro
09-16-2010, 06:36 AM
The string tension losing is the biggest problem for different stringing method. But I think if you tried these methods and the tension is same at the final, then choose one method that more skilful of you is better.

JackB1
02-12-2011, 08:27 PM
Thread revival alert!!!

What is the best of all these ways?

I have always done it like this:

-pull tension on both mains
-clamp L1 at the top, close to the grommet
-use a starting clamp at the bottom of L1, outside the frame
-tension R1 and R2
-tension L2, removing the starting clamp
-alternate sides from there

Anything wrong with this method?

Lakers4Life
02-12-2011, 08:39 PM
The USRSA way, at least to pass the CRT/MRT test, is no more than 3 ahead per side. As for setting the anchor main, it's personal preference.

I kind of use Irvin's demonstrated method of starting the mains. Set the anchor main, then 2 on one side, 4 on the opposite side, 4 on the other side, then finish off the opposite side, then back to starting side to finish.

Some people like to do 2 per side, or back and forth. All within the USRSA guidelines.

jim e
02-13-2011, 07:29 AM
Thread revival alert!!!

What is the best of all these ways?

I have always done it like this:

-pull tension on both mains
-clamp L1 at the top, close to the grommet
-use a starting clamp at the bottom of L1, outside the frame
-tension R1 and R2
-tension L2, removing the starting clamp
-alternate sides from there

Anything wrong with this method?

Nothing wrong at all EXCEPT.
Except the part in bold I highlighted in your post, did you not mean L1? As that string needs to be tensioned again as it was only pulled to set the clamp in the beginning, and not properly tensioned!!

Other than that mistake...
Thats a great way of stringing the racquet.(Also you are not tensioning more than 3 on a side , and this method was published in the USRSA magazine RSI Sept. 2009 issue ) , so this is within USRSA guidlines, Published by the USRSA, and my preferred way as well. )
It backs up the anchor clamp, and this way allows you to clamp the machines clamps close to the inside of the racquet frame next to each other as there is room to place the clamps. (I never liked to stagger the clamps like some do. )

What you are doing is the YUSUKI method.
But not if you did not go back and retension L1 (Then you remove the starting clamp, and clamp L1 as normal.
Be sure that you do retension that other 1st main!!!! That may be your problem!!

dgdawg
02-13-2011, 08:38 AM
...hmmmm. I've read about 1/2 these threads and didn't realize there were so many ways to achieve the same thing.
Maybe I'm a little numb, back woods, etc....I just thread both M's (1st 2), fix a clamp on one M at the starting side of the frame, hold that clamp at the height of the frame, and tension the opposite M.
Then I proceed with one main on each side til the M's are complete.
This sounds so archaic, simple and "yesterday", compared to what's being talked about here.
Can someone explain why the most obvious and simple isn't the "norm".
I've seen all the other methods over the years, but haven't been able to decide why anything I've seen is "better" for any particular reason.
I see no benefit to pulling both M's at the same time, putting a clamp on one then releasing the tension. What does that do?

KISS........"keep it simple, stupid". Or in this case "keep it stupid simple"

jim e
02-13-2011, 08:53 AM
[QUOTE=dgdawg;5418627I see no benefit to pulling both M's at the same time, putting a clamp on one then releasing the tension. What does that do?
[/QUOTE]

1st off, Your method is fine.
Benefit of pulling both initially is that would give some string tension inside the clamp itself, and if that string that is clamped is backed up with a starting clamp on the outside of the racquet on that same string it keeps the clamp up straight from falling down and then when you go to tension the 1st main on other side, that starting clamp helps back it up as well.
There are many ways that are acceptable, and no one is saying one is better over the other, but this is giving some people here some options to try and see what they would like. Naturally what you are comfortable with, you will do the best job with.
Back in 2009, when I read the YUSUKI method, and used it, I kept doing it that way since. Its easy for me, and works, but then again so do other ways.

dgdawg
02-13-2011, 09:07 AM
1st off, Your method is fine.
Benefit of pulling both initially is that would give some string tension inside the clamp itself, and if that string that is clamped is backed up with a starting clamp on the outside of the racquet on that same string it keeps the clamp up straight from falling down and then when you go to tension the 1st main on other side, that starting clamp helps back it up as well.
There are many ways that are acceptable, and no one is saying one is better over the other, but this is giving some people here some options to try and see what they would like. Naturally what you are comfortable with, you will do the best job with.
Back in 2009, when I read the YUSUKI method, and used it, I kept doing it that way since. Its easy for me, and works, but then again so do other ways.

Thanks jim-I sincerely thought I was missing something.
Where can I find this YUSUKI method?

JackB1
02-13-2011, 11:08 AM
Nothing wrong at all EXCEPT.
Except the part in bold I highlighted in your post, did you not mean L1? As that string needs to be tensioned again as it was only pulled to set the clamp in the beginning, and not properly tensioned!!

Other than that mistake...
Thats a great way of stringing the racquet.(Also you are not tensioning more than 3 on a side , and this method was published in the USRSA magazine RSI Sept. 2009 issue ) , so this is within USRSA guidlines, Published by the USRSA, and my preferred way as well. )
It backs up the anchor clamp, and this way allows you to clamp the machines clamps close to the inside of the racquet frame next to each other as there is room to place the clamps. (I never liked to stagger the clamps like some do. )

What you are doing is the YUSUKI method.
But not if you did not go back and retension L1 (Then you remove the starting clamp, and clamp L1 as normal.
Be sure that you do retension that other 1st main!!!! That may be your problem!!

My mistake. Yes I go back and tension L1, removing the starting clamp. Then I tension L2 and alternate from there. Good catch! You were paying good attention :)

jim e
02-13-2011, 11:56 AM
My mistake. Yes I go back and tension L1, removing the starting clamp. Then I tension L2 and alternate from there. Good catch! You were paying good attention :)

The way you start the job is a nice way to go.

retlod
02-15-2011, 12:07 PM
Initially I pull two strings just to set the clamp on the string. Then each string is pulled again to set tension before clamping on the other end.

That's the way I do it, too.

dgdawg
02-15-2011, 12:10 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irvin
Initially I pull two strings just to set the clamp on the string. Then each string is pulled again to set tension before clamping on the other end.




That's the way I do it, too.

Why?

SirGounder
02-16-2011, 11:01 AM
I've been using Yulitle's method just because that's what I started with. It seems pretty simple.

Ash_Smith
02-16-2011, 01:18 PM
I now use the Yusuki method and that is what we teach (encourage) students to use on the UKRSA courses. As far as i'm concerned it is the best way to ensure that the proper tension is set on both centre mains and therefore ensure consistency between stringjobs.

Cheers

Ash

JackB1
02-16-2011, 01:40 PM
I now use the Yusuki method and that is what we teach (encourage) students to use on the UKRSA courses. As far as i'm concerned it is the best way to ensure that the proper tension is set on both centre mains and therefore ensure consistency between stringjobs.

Ash

Is there anything in writing that spells out this method?

Ash_Smith
02-16-2011, 01:54 PM
It was posted up here a little while ago but it's basically...

1. Thread and pull tension on both centre mains
2. Clamp right main near the starting loop inside the frame
3. Clamp right main outside of the frame with a starting clamp
4. Clamp left main as normal
5. Re-pull left side main (release clamp once string is under tension in the tension head)
6. Continue short side for 2 more strings (3 tensioned in total)
7. Re-pull right main, remove starting clamp, and clamp off as normal
8. Continue long side for 5 more strings (6 tensioned in total)
9. Finish short side
10. Finish long side

Hope that makes sense!

Cheers

Ash

jim e
02-16-2011, 02:23 PM
It was posted up here a little while ago but it's basically...

1. Thread and pull tension on both centre mains
2. Clamp right main near the starting loop inside the frame
3. Clamp right main outside of the frame with a starting clamp
4. Clamp left main as normal
5. Re-pull left side main (release clamp once string is under tension in the tension head)
6. Continue short side for 2 more strings (3 tensioned in total)
7. Re-pull right main, remove starting clamp, and clamp off as normal
8. Continue long side for 5 more strings (6 tensioned in total)
9. Finish short side
10. Finish long side

Hope that makes sense!

Cheers

Ash

I String the Yusuki Method as described in the RSI article, and it is basically what you described, except not clamping left main as normal for #4 as you list,
1.Thread and pull tension on both centre mains
2.Clamp right main near the starting loop inside the frame
3.Clamp right main outside of the frame with a starting clamp

THIS IS WHERE WE DIFFER (I do not clamp the LM1 as yet as I see no reason to, although you can, the RSI article does not list this to be done)
4. release tension (clamp on RM1 stays in place nice as it is backed up with starting clamp as listed in step3. )
5 pull tension LM1 clamp as normal
6 pull and clamp LM2 clamp as normal.
7 repull RM1 remove starting clamp , clamp as normal
8 continue stringing no more than 3/side.

As stated in the RSI article is that with this method you do pull one additional pull when starting mains( which would be the repull of RM1 that had the starting clamp on it. )

Ash_Smith
02-16-2011, 02:32 PM
^^^ Yeah, they're are essentially the same, there's just a little work around when re-pulling LM1. My way you clamp LM1 and then re-tension (releasing the clamp base when the string is under tension so the clamp slides with the string). The one in RSI you don't clamp LM1 at all until after it's tensioned the second time. Like I said, just a slight variation in that one step but otherwise the same. Not sure which is Toro's definitive way - I know we (UKRSA) picked it up from when Liam ran the Wimbledon stringing team and Toro was on the team.

Cheers

Ash

sstchur
02-16-2011, 03:28 PM
^^^ Yeah, they're are essentially the same, there's just a little work around when re-pulling LM1. My way you clamp LM1 and then re-tension (releasing the clamp base when the string is under tension so the clamp slides with the string). The one in RSI you don't clamp LM1 at all until after it's tensioned the second time. Like I said, just a slight variation in that one step but otherwise the same. Not sure which is Toro's definitive way - I know we (UKRSA) picked it up from when Liam ran the Wimbledon stringing team and Toro was on the team.

Cheers

Ash

No matter how many times I read about this method, it just does not make sense to me. I go through the process in my head and each time I see problems (admittedly, this must be because I'm not properly picturing what I'm actually reading).

My preferred method is one that allows me not to crush grommets or to have to stagger clamps and it goes like this:

1. Thread both center mains
2. Thread one more main on either side (I use the R)
3. Put a starting clamp outside the frame on the RM2
4. Pull tension on the RM2, clamp
5. Pull tension on the RM1, clamp with the same clamp you used for RM2
6. Pull tension on the LM1, clamp
7. Pull tension again on RM2 and remove starting clamp
8. Clamp RM2 by using the clamp that was on RM1
9. Now that you have enough space that clamps don't need to be staggered and the starting clamp has been removed, proceed as desired.

I used to use Drakulie's method, but I do feel just a tad uncomfortable w/ the starting clamp inside the frame b/c of what it can do to a grommet. The method I use now is similar, but it's tweaked to move that starting clamp to outside the frame.

sstchur
02-16-2011, 03:31 PM
No matter how many times I read about this method, it just does not make sense to me. I go through the process in my head and each time I see problems (admittedly, this must be because I'm not properly picturing what I'm actually reading).

My preferred method is one that allows me not to crush grommets or to have to stagger clamps and it goes like this:

1. Thread both center mains
2. Thread one more main on either side (I use the R)
3. Put a starting clamp outside the frame on the RM2
4. Pull tension on the RM2, clamp
5. Pull tension on the RM1, clamp with the same clamp you used for RM2
6. Pull tension on the LM1, clamp
7. Pull tension again on RM2 and remove starting clamp
8. Clamp RM2 by using the clamp that was on RM1
9. Now that you have enough space that clamps don't need to be staggered and the starting clamp has been removed, proceed as desired.

I used to use Drakulie's method, but I do feel just a tad uncomfortable w/ the starting clamp inside the frame b/c of what it can do to a grommet. The method I use now is similar, but it's tweaked to move that starting clamp to outside the frame.

After re-reading jim e's response to Ash's post, I think I get it now. It was, in fact, step 4 that was throwing me off a bit.

I may give this method a try next time around.

GPB
02-16-2011, 06:38 PM
All this sounds great, until I remember I have floating clamps. Maybe one day I'll join you big boys and your fancy machines!

dgdawg
02-17-2011, 05:03 AM
^^^ Yeah, they're are essentially the same, there's just a little work around when re-pulling LM1. My way you clamp LM1 and then re-tension (releasing the clamp base when the string is under tension so the clamp slides with the string). The one in RSI you don't clamp LM1 at all until after it's tensioned the second time. Like I said, just a slight variation in that one step but otherwise the same. Not sure which is Toro's definitive way - I know we (UKRSA) picked it up from when Liam ran the Wimbledon stringing team and Toro was on the team.

Cheers

Ash

OK-I still don't understand why it's necessary to pull both M's, clamp one, then release them. I don't know what is achieved by doing this. Can someone please explain?
I guess I'm numb, and/or have possibly been doing things wrong for years? (I passed my CS test on the first try)
I string every frame the same:
-Butt cap points up (Prince O frames being the exception). SS is always away from me (if 2 piece)
-I clamp the M farthest away from me (as close to the frame as possible at the starting side)
-Pull the opposite M, then clamp.
-Pull other M. (the one that was 1st clamped)
I pull and clamp each M and spin the frame around and pull and clamp the next 2.
I do 1 M on each side till the M's are done.

sstchur
02-17-2011, 07:41 AM
OK-I still don't understand why it's necessary to pull both M's, clamp one, then release them. I don't know what is achieved by doing this. Can someone please explain?
I guess I'm numb, and/or have possibly been doing things wrong for years? (I passed my CS test on the first try)
I string every frame the same:
-Butt cap points up (Prince O frames being the exception). SS is always away from me (if 2 piece)
-I clamp the M farthest away from me (as close to the frame as possible at the starting side)
-Pull the opposite M, then clamp.
-Pull other M. (the one that was 1st clamped)
I pull and clamp each M and spin the frame around and pull and clamp the next 2.
I do 1 M on each side till the M's are done.

If I understand correctly, it is to ensure that that actual part of the string that you clamp gets tensioned. Otherwise, that inch and a half or whatever it happens to be that your clamp covers, is clamped untensioned. It may also reduce the stress on the clamp for that first pull.

dgdawg
02-17-2011, 07:57 AM
If I understand correctly, it is to ensure that that actual part of the string that you clamp gets tensioned. Otherwise, that inch and a half or whatever it happens to be that your clamp covers, is clamped untensioned. It may also reduce the stress on the clamp for that first pull.

Ahh, got it.
Well....I guess I get that with a lock out/crank machine, but a constant pull tensioner would "pick up the slack" when that 1st clamp is released.
It's all good. As they say, "there's a million way's to skin a cat".
I'm all about time, but I take my time, if that makes sense.
-I pull X's really slow when they intersect M's @ the frame.
-I never let the tail go when stringing one piece, or X's. I always keep it in my hand so I don't have to go get it.
-I tension both M's before I spin the frame around.
I was just hoping there wasn't some detrimental reason for doing this and I wasn't!!! :shock:

Power Player
02-17-2011, 07:57 AM
All this sounds great, until I remember I have floating clamps. Maybe one day I'll join you big boys and your fancy machines!

You can do it with a dropweight. It took me a while to grasp it myself. You need 2 floating clamps and a starting clamp.

Thread your 2 mains into the racquet and then put them both in your gripper and pull tension. It does not have to be a full horizontal bar, just some tension on the 2 strings. Now take a flaoting clamp and clamp both strings away from the gripper side and right up on the inside of the frame where the mains looped.

Now pull tension on your left string and get the bar horizontal. Put a starting clamp outside and against the frame to hold that string at tension (either inside the throat or outside the top hoop depnding on your racquet pattern). Now do the same thing for the right string and unclamp the floating clamp. then clamp both main strings inside the frame close to the gripper side.

Now your mains should both be at tension. staying on the right side, string it through to the opposite side and pull tension again. Unclamp the floating clamp and clamp on the opposite side of the frame (just the normal stringing method) and you will have the center right and right strings clamped with the center left being held by the floating clamp.

Staying on the right side, string it through again and repeat the above process. If done right, you will now have 2 strings on the right to clamp, the right main will not be clamped.

Now pull tension on the string with the starting clamp on it. Release the starting clamp and get another floating clamp. Clamp inside the frame. If you did it right, you will have 2 floating clamps right next to each other on the side closest to the gripper. Now just do the left side twice and you will be caught up on both sides.

Hopefully my explanation makes sense and is technically correct. If it is not, I am open to correction from the stringing experts here!

:)

jim e
02-17-2011, 10:40 AM
-I never let the tail go when stringing one piece, or X's. I always keep it in my hand so I don't have to go get it.


Not to be critical, but if you string nat. gut you will want to let the end hang free when stringing the cross strings so the twist unravels naturally, as the string can twist, or untwist and cause a problem, especially when you get to last few cross strings.

Yes, the method for starting mains I listed puts some tension on the string inside the clamp, and also with the starting clamp on that string on the outside, it backs up the 1st machines clamp, as the most stress is placed on that very 1st clamp when you 1st pull on it. It also keeps the 1st clamp straight and up where it belongs without falling down or needing to hold it up as well.
Many stringers have that 1st clamp set too tight and crush the string causing some delicate strings to snap early, or they have it set too loose, causing slipping, which causes string damage as well, and with this method of backing up the clamp, it eliminates this issue, as you do not need to have that 1st clamp set so tight to hold properly.

dgdawg
02-17-2011, 11:25 AM
Not to be critical, but if you string nat. gut you will want to let the end hang free when stringing the cross strings so the twist unravels naturally, as the string can twist, or untwist and cause a problem, especially when you get to last few cross strings.

Yes, the method for starting mains I listed puts some tension on the string inside the clamp, and also with the starting clamp on that string on the outside, it backs up the 1st machines clamp, as the most stress is placed on that very 1st clamp when you 1st pull on it. It also keeps the 1st clamp straight and up where it belongs without falling down or needing to hold it up as well.
Many stringers have that 1st clamp set too tight and crush the string causing some delicate strings to snap early, or they have it set too loose, causing slipping, which causes string damage as well, and with this method of backing up the clamp, it eliminates this issue, as you do not need to have that 1st clamp set so tight to hold properly.

String X one ahead, you never lose the tail. That said, when I string natty, 2 or 3 times during stringing X's, I run the remaining length between my fingers, CAREFULLY, to remove the "twist".

Starting M's-Not to sound arrogant, but Bab clamps hold like a "mother". Even under low clamping pressure.
When I string a frame above 65lbs, I back up the clamp on the 1st pull with a starting clamp.
Clamps I had in the past, I would back up the clamp on the 1st pull with a starting clamp.
I try to stay away for using a starting clamp inside the hoop. It seems to crush string.

jim e
02-17-2011, 02:05 PM
String X one ahead, you never lose the tail. That said, when I string natty, 2 or 3 times during stringing X's, I run the remaining length between my fingers, CAREFULLY, to remove the "twist".

Starting M's-Not to sound arrogant, but Bab clamps hold like a "mother". Even under low clamping pressure.
When I string a frame above 65lbs, I back up the clamp on the 1st pull with a starting clamp.
Clamps I had in the past, I would back up the clamp on the 1st pull with a starting clamp.
I try to stay away for using a starting clamp inside the hoop. It seems to crush string.

Your way is fine! many ways to skin a cat to say the least. I really don't think it makes a difference one way or another. It's what you are comfortable doing, will make a consistant job, and go the best for you.I always heard that Babolat clamps are the industry best! I have seen some big box store stringers crush the heck out of the string on the 1st clamp, or it slips on them. That is an issue with some stringers, certainly not all, but some here have not been long at it,as well as some big box stringers, and really can't adjust them properly,or even know how tight to have it, and this way can avoid that issue.

dgdawg
02-17-2011, 02:16 PM
Your way is fine! many ways to skin a cat to say the least. I really don't think it makes a difference one way or another. It's what you are comfortable doing, will make a consistant job, and go the best for you.I always heard that Babolat clamps are the industry best! I have seen some big box store stringers crush the heck out of the string on the 1st clamp, or it slips on them. That is an issue with some stringers, certainly not all, but some here have not been long at it,as well as some big box stringers, and really can't adjust them properly,or even know how tight to have it, and this way can avoid that issue.

This post really has me thinking. Do you have a link to the Yuski method?
I'm told the Wilson string team uses a single clamp backed up by starting clamp for their starting method.
Sounds like maybe I'm not far off.

jim e
02-17-2011, 02:19 PM
Good clamps are a good part of it as well.
I have a Pro Master machine, now distributed by xtremesportsmachines.
The 5 tooth clamps that came with it are great, but a set of 3 tooth eagnas clamps, I no longer use and just keep as a back up set just in case, as those do not seem to hold as well as I have to have those tighter, and no doubt has more drawback in comparison to the 5 tooth clamps that came with my machine, so those 5 tooth ones are the ones I primarily use, so I know what you mean that your clamps hold well, as thats a big part of it, no doubt.

jim e
02-17-2011, 02:23 PM
This post really has me thinking. Do you have a link to the Yuski method?
I'm told the Wilson string team uses a single clamp backed up by starting clamp for their starting method.
Sounds like maybe I'm not far off.

That link that the USRSA had was removed. Seems that they changed and now only put a portion of RSI online anymore. I have the magazine in hand, it is the Sept/October, 2009 issue.

dgdawg
02-17-2011, 02:26 PM
That link that the USRSA had was removed. Seems that they changed and now only put a portion of RSI online anymore. I have the magazine in hand, it is the Sept/October, 2009 issue.

I don't have that issue anymore.
I'll keep poking around and see what I can find.
Thanks, man!!

Irvin
02-17-2011, 05:14 PM
When you pull tension on both mains the string that is clamped will be pulled straight throught he clamp. This will reduce the chance of the string sliping in the clamp. If you back up the clamp with a starting clamp (like the 'Yusuki' method) you will have even less chance of damaging the string.

I don't pull tension on a string that is only held by one clamp.

Irvin

dgdawg
02-17-2011, 05:37 PM
-----------------------------

CHOcobo
02-17-2011, 08:24 PM
i don't know if anyone has mentioned it yet but there is a method you can you do using flying clamps without have any metal to frame/grommet contact, and without double pulling anything. it's the method using the starting pin. i use it with a drop weight. works good for me just fine. i don't have a starting clamp or fixed clamp so i can't do those on the videos.

Lakers4Life
02-17-2011, 08:57 PM
If I were Yoda I'd probably say, "a Train Wreck in the Force, I sense"

dgdawg
02-17-2011, 09:35 PM
If I were Yoda I'd probably say, "a Train Wreck in the Force, I sense"

Ha ha......If Paul Harvey was still around, you would know "the rest of the story"

GPB
02-18-2011, 05:29 AM
You can do it with a dropweight. It took me a while to grasp it myself. You need 2 floating clamps and a starting clamp.

Thread your 2 mains into the racquet and then put them both in your gripper and pull tension. It does not have to be a full horizontal bar, just some tension on the 2 strings. Now take a flaoting clamp and clamp both strings away from the gripper side and right up on the inside of the frame where the mains looped.

Now pull tension on your left string and get the bar horizontal. Put a starting clamp outside and against the frame to hold that string at tension (either inside the throat or outside the top hoop depnding on your racquet pattern). Now do the same thing for the right string and unclamp the floating clamp. then clamp both main strings inside the frame close to the gripper side.

Now your mains should both be at tension. staying on the right side, string it through to the opposite side and pull tension again. Unclamp the floating clamp and clamp on the opposite side of the frame (just the normal stringing method) and you will have the center right and right strings clamped with the center left being held by the floating clamp.

Staying on the right side, string it through again and repeat the above process. If done right, you will now have 2 strings on the right to clamp, the right main will not be clamped.

Now pull tension on the string with the starting clamp on it. Release the starting clamp and get another floating clamp. Clamp inside the frame. If you did it right, you will have 2 floating clamps right next to each other on the side closest to the gripper. Now just do the left side twice and you will be caught up on both sides.

Hopefully my explanation makes sense and is technically correct. If it is not, I am open to correction from the stringing experts here!

:)

Yep, that's how I start my stringjobs. I suppose technically we only have one more pull than the other fixed-clamp guys. That's a great write-up, by the way!

Power Player
02-18-2011, 12:56 PM
Thanks! It seems to work real well for me.