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HiroProtagonist
09-09-2010, 06:09 PM
So I have to face the reality that I am not wealthy enough to commit to tennis as I have these past 2 years w/out learning how to string my own racquets. And of course I will have to purchase a stringing machine, but I would rather not ruin ne of my babies experimenting in my stringing infancy.

So how did u learn to string? How would u suggest I go about learning? I cant really think of ne way besides getting a machine and blundering through it, do I have ne other options?

tia

struggle
09-09-2010, 06:20 PM
start here. it's not rocket science. if you can turn a wrench, you can string a racket.....it's a tool oriented practice.


http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=172626

HiroProtagonist
09-09-2010, 06:38 PM
TY, ne suggestions on a good machine, or type of machine to start w?

struggle
09-09-2010, 07:27 PM
depends on your budget. you can buy an adequate machine for almost any amount you are willing to spend.

rich s
09-09-2010, 07:37 PM
Do research in the forum to figure out what machine and type fits you and your budget.

Watch Yulitle's many informative videos on Y o u t u b e

Ask lots of questions.

Once you pick up a stringer, buy an old racquet at a yard sale and a $16 reel of Forten Nylon and practice..... a lot......

HiroProtagonist
09-09-2010, 09:50 PM
Thnx, I was thinking about something in the $200-$300 range, I figure its worth the investment.

struggle
09-09-2010, 09:53 PM
Thnx, I was thinking about something in the $200-$300 range, I figure its worth the investment.


lotsa folks will bash it, but i'd consider the eagnas challenger I.
best bang for the buck in a dropweight machine, IMO.

I have an eagnas combo 910, quite happy with it.

singnflip4life
09-09-2010, 10:18 PM
Klippermate will do you tons of good. That's where I learned, and it will provide good constant consistant tension even when you're learning. And it will get easier as you go. If I had to pick one machine in that price range, it wins hands down. It's an absolute tank, and while it has no fixed clamps, those aren't even really needed. Durable (practically indestructible) and with such a low price tag, 10-15 stringjobs will get you your money's worth.

beernutz
09-10-2010, 08:20 AM
If you are planning on just stringing for yourself, primarily what you save with your own stringer is the labor you pay your current stringer plus whatever overhead he/she may charge you on strings.

If you plan to also string for family members or friends for free or for the cost of string you may also generate some goodwill which is nice.

If you think you'd also string for money, you may be able to pick up a few dollars on the side to help pay back the cost of your machine or actually turn a profit.

My point is that before buying a $200 or so machine like a Klippermate or Gamma x-2, both of which I've used and recommend, you may want to think about saving some more money and get a machine with some additional features like a better mounting system and fixed clamps. You might be happier in the long run.

OTOH, if you decide later on you don't really like to string your own racquets, then buying a Klippermate or X-2 minimizes your risk of loss as you'd probably be able to see either one quickly and at only a small loss.

I bought a used Prince Neos last July and just between stringing for myself, my wife and daughter, and a very few paying customers I've already broken even on the deal. I've also strung for free for a couple of friends which I was glad to do.

Good luck and I think you'll be happy with any stringer if your main goal is to save some money. Then you'll also get the added benefit of being able to cheaply experiment with different strings or hybrids and you'll avoid the two trips to the stringer and the sometimes long wait for them to finish.

jgrushing
09-10-2010, 09:17 AM
IMO, nothing in the $200 - $300 range warrants going above the $145 Klippermate. Consistent, fantastic machine--never wears out. 25 - 30 minute jobs are very realistic with practice.

I've said it many times. Mine's 20 years old--basically as good as new after hundreds of racquets.

jim e
09-10-2010, 09:25 AM
Your question asks the best way to learn to string.
In my opinion that would be to have a stringer show you,.
Back in 1968, I had a stringer that strung my racquets tell me he had an extra machine, and he was willing to show me how to string as well.
Best way would be to find a local stringer that would be willing to show you at least the basics to get you started.
The USRSA web site even has stringers listed that are willing to spend time for a fee, and get you on your way. They have a listing on their site where you put in your state and location and stringers will show up that are willing to teach.
Maybe there is a local stringer that you have done buisness with, that would not mind getting you started with the basics.Just have to ask.If you get a grasp on what is done, then you would have a better understanding of the different machines as well and that could help you make a better machine purchase as well.This way you would have a better understanding of the process, and machine features that you would like, or can do without, like getting a machine with fixed clamps, or floating clamps, etc.
Yes you can also get much information off the internet, videos, and the nice people that post here, but you did ask for the best way.
If you join the USRSA, they have their digest with all the string patterns for most of the racquets out there, and a stringing manual with just about everything you need to know about stringing all printed in their manual.
It does help to have someone actually show you.

HiroProtagonist
09-10-2010, 11:35 AM
Your question asks the best way to learn to string.
In my opinion that would be to have a stringer show you,.
Back in 1968, I had a stringer that strung my racquets tell me he had an extra machine, and he was willing to show me how to string as well.
Best way would be to find a local stringer that would be willing to show you at least the basics to get you started.
The USRSA web site even has stringers listed that are willing to spend time for a fee, and get you on your way. They have a listing on their site where you put in your state and location and stringers will show up that are willing to teach.
Maybe there is a local stringer that you have done buisness with, that would not mind getting you started with the basics.Just have to ask.If you get a grasp on what is done, then you would have a better understanding of the different machines as well and that could help you make a better machine purchase as well.This way you would have a better understanding of the process, and machine features that you would like, or can do without, like getting a machine with fixed clamps, or floating clamps, etc.
Yes you can also get much information off the internet, videos, and the nice people that post here, but you did ask for the best way.
If you join the USRSA, they have their digest with all the string patterns for most of the racquets out there, and a stringing manual with just about everything you need to know about stringing all printed in their manual.
It does help to have someone actually show you.

TY this is definitely what I was looking for, I would very much like to get SOME experience b4 I purchase a machine. I will check out the USRSA site, thnx again to everyone for helping this very enthusiastic stringing noob:)

Also I was reading the buying guide and it said that a 2point machine will deform a racquet more than a 6 point, is this effect reason enough to stay away from a 2point machine?

jim e
09-10-2010, 04:23 PM
Again, the USRSA web site has this link from a previous issue of RSI magazine. There are some features of the USRSA web site you can access without being a member.
The 2 links below can help sort out features on machines, and was well written.
It gives you an overall look at machines and features.
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/articles/2008/08/2008_guide_to_stringing_machin.html

Also the features page on this article is good, and all you have to do is click on the manufacturer name to go right to the manuf. web site.
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200808/200808stringing_machines.html

Keep in mind that you do get what you pay for.

HiroProtagonist
09-10-2010, 05:34 PM
Thnx again,

U guys saved me a lot of fruitless searching, thnx for pointing me in the right direction, I believe I now have what I need to proceed w confidence.

meowmix
09-11-2010, 09:10 AM
Getting an experienced stringer to show you the ropes is a definite plus. Also, go out to your local goodwill/thrift store and pick up a racket that you wouldn't mind screwing up for a few bucks and practice stringing that thing first. Get a feel for the process, how to use the machine, how to string. Then start on your own frames.

Irvin
09-11-2010, 09:43 AM
Start by getting a low cost Gamma or Klippermate dropweight. Isn't there any one in this OP's area that will show him the ropes?

Irvin

singnflip4life
09-11-2010, 12:16 PM
I would help out (for free too) but I'm a little too far North to help unless he just happens to be in my area. If you want some good, cheap practice strings, take a look at Klipper USA. It's not a very playable string, but at $17+shipping for a 660' reel, it's hard to beat the Klipper Nylon 15 as a practice stringing string. And it's not a horrible string really, just really thick.

http://www.klipperusa.com/products/gripstringdetail.php?catnum=S270

philosoraptor
09-12-2010, 08:32 AM
http://www.sptennis.com/stringer.asp#Ready
^simplest guide to string ever!

Donny0627
09-12-2010, 12:41 PM
Hey im new to stringing also(only strung 2 rackets since getting my machine on friday).

1) go to "YULitle"s channel on youtube, and basically watch all of the videos(yes it is time consuming, but very helpful)

2) get a cheap walmart racket and practice on it at least once.
(get a reel of forten nylon or something to practice with)

3) then go from there

PS: I bought the gamma progression II 602 dropweight machine. Works great so far

Ash_Smith
09-12-2010, 12:50 PM
+1 for having a competent stringer show you the ropes. Yulitle's vids are excellent (as are those that Irvin has done recently) but there's no substitute for having somebody standing there with you to help you out and talk you through it.

Ash

Irvin
09-12-2010, 01:02 PM
+2 on someone to show you the ropes. As far as getting a cheap Wal-Mart racket and practicing I would give that one a thumbs down. How are you doing to know if you did it right or not. Get you favorite racket with strings you like and go for it. Play with it and do it all over again. It's cheap now that you have your own stringer. I wonder how many people started out like me thinking a racket may crack while I am stringing it. Well it never happened. Not once in 30 years.

Irvin

Ash_Smith
09-12-2010, 01:38 PM
^^^ I remember one of the first racquets I strung up...I was being extra careful as it was one of the first I had done for a customer after practicing on mine loads and I got to just about finishing the mains and the head looked bent out of shape - no longer a nice oval. With my heart jumping out of my chest just at the thought of having destroyed this guys pride and joy I quickly cut out the strings and unmounted the racquet...to realise that the racquet was meant to be that shape in the first place!

I agree with doing your own racquet - you'll want to play with the frame you string a little each time - just so you can feel the differences as you change and develop your technique.

Ash

jim e
09-12-2010, 04:47 PM
+2 on someone to show you the ropes. As far as getting a cheap Wal-Mart racket and practicing I would give that one a thumbs down. How are you doing to know if you did it right or not. Get you favorite racket with strings you like and go for it. Play with it and do it all over again. It's cheap now that you have your own stringer. I wonder how many people started out like me thinking a racket may crack while I am stringing it. Well it never happened. Not once in 30 years.

Irvin

You are correct on this Irvin!
My 1st racquet stringing was with the old timer that was teaching me, back in 1968. Since he knew what string and racquet I used as he strung mine a # of times in the past, he had me use my racquet and string that I normally hit with.
I used my normal racquet, a Tad/ Davis , and strung it with Victor Imperial Gut, and that was my 1st attempt at stringing! Granted the old timer was there telling me what to do, but it all went just the way it should.(The gut back then was not as durable as todays is as well).He told me once that went well, I would be able to string any other string that was avail.as Gut would be the most fragile.
Bottom line, don't waste your time, and effort to string a cheap racquet that you will not use or like, just go for it!

max
09-12-2010, 05:09 PM
As an Old Guy, this is a very curious post to me.

It reminds me of a time I saw a 12 year-old boy trying to saw wood for the first time. . . in other words, perhaps today's youth just haven't had experience doing many different kinds of things.

Stringing was very easy for me; I just read closely and followed the Klippermate manual. The manual's line drawings were a plus: they emphasized the important stuff better than photos would, I think. And the text read well.

But I do wonder if there's a young generation out there that doesn't know what an alternator does for a car.

dodgers
09-12-2010, 05:45 PM
I've been stringing now for about 5 years. Self taught. Joint the US stringers get the book and read, search the net, youtube etc. The main thing, just get a good quality machine and start stringing. Its not that much rocket science.

tray999
09-13-2010, 03:24 AM
I would like to suggest you go to David Henry's site http://www.inspired-tennis.com/learn-to-string/. David has an excellent video set on learning to string.

HiroProtagonist
09-13-2010, 09:02 PM
As an Old Guy, this is a very curious post to me.

It reminds me of a time I saw a 12 year-old boy trying to saw wood for the first time. . . in other words, perhaps today's youth just haven't had experience doing many different kinds of things.

Stringing was very easy for me; I just read closely and followed the Klippermate manual. The manual's line drawings were a plus: they emphasized the important stuff better than photos would, I think. And the text read well.

But I do wonder if there's a young generation out there that doesn't know what an alternator does for a car.

First of all I have to say this post is a little less than friendly and courteous. And second I tend to agree that their is both a lack of experience and a fear of it in the youth of today. The reason I made this post at the risk of sounding like a scared little 12 yo is because of my financial situation and the money involved, both in buying a string machine and risking my racquets. Also I find the committed and serious tennis community on this board both pleasant to correspond w and extremely helpful, and having a lack of any friends or mentors that come newhere near to my interest and enthusiasm for tennis this is the only place I have to go for advice(that's free).

As an old man I suppose that its possible u have forgotten what its like to try and learn something new. But as an old man I would also think that instead of reinforcing a young persons fear for asking for advice at the risk of sounding stupid, u would instead try and share ur knowledge and personal experience in an open and friendly manner, helping to shape the generation(s) u seem to disprove of. But I suppose it is easier to criticize than it is to take the time to help someone.

To each their own, and thnx again to everyone for the replies.

John55
09-14-2010, 12:33 AM
Best place to learn how to string today is to watch the various youtube videos. Invaluable lessons learned from people stringing racquets right before your eyes. Plus there is usually a few people stringing with the same stringer you may end up purchasing.

Good luck!

esgee48
09-14-2010, 08:46 AM
Just an FYI. If you are pre-arthritic or have arthritis in your fingers, you should not get a stringer. I know of someone who had this condition, bought a stringer and couldn't use it. Ended up selling the machine.

max
09-14-2010, 01:06 PM
The OP's a little too sensitive; I'm talking like an adult would talk, since I am an adult. There is no criticism of the OP in my remark. It IS possible to talk of differences between generations, and while it is always easier to say the younger generation has more positive attributes than the older, in some instances this is not the case. In my experiences, I have found MANY young people unable to do some very elementary and basic things for themselves. My peers have shared similar experiences, etc.

The reason, I think, is that the world is too simple for kids. Their day is heavily structured; the range of activities they pursue is limited. . . and those things they do, they do more intensively than we did when we were young. Today's 12 year-old tennis player is a better tennis player than a 12 year-old would be in 1966. But he may not know how to cook a meal for himself.

(Being "nice": I'm glad to see the OP has enough confidence to forge ahead into something new; he's blessed in this regard.)

Ash_Smith
09-14-2010, 02:23 PM
^^^Todays 12 year old can probably strip down, rewire and reassemble your laptop so that it can make toast, which I'm pretty sure most adults couldn't do.

Previous generations used (played with) the technology of their time (cars, tools etc), current generations use (play) with the technology of theirs (electronics etc).

Ash

VGP
09-14-2010, 06:28 PM
Lots of good advice.....

....or you can do what I did. Plunk some money down and mail order a machine, read the instruction manual and have at it. None of this internet mumbo jumbo. Just good ol' first hand trial and error coupled with common sense.

BTW - that was back in 1992. Just decided in college that I wanted to string my own frames.

zapvor
09-14-2010, 07:07 PM
someone prob mentioned it but YuLite is a great resource on here. check out his youtubes. nothing beats having a person there to show you though

singnflip4life
09-14-2010, 10:06 PM
Lots of good advice.....

....or you can do what I did. Plunk some money down and mail order a machine, read the instruction manual and have at it. None of this internet mumbo jumbo. Just good ol' first hand trial and error coupled with common sense.

BTW - that was back in 1992. Just decided in college that I wanted to string my own frames.

Unfortunately, this can backfire easily, especially with lighter frames. I know of starting stringers who cracked their rackets any number of ways.

Jamming a sharp awl into a grommet, scraping and gouging the frame on the inside, weakening the frame to the point where it broke on it's first volley frame hit.

Pulling two strings in one tensioning motion. I saw a guy pull 4 mains at once to do a fast string job, and then did it for the crosses too. Led to a circular frame, I almost cried when I saw the result of the poor racket.

Going straight out on the mains instead of alternating each side. (Admittedly, I do two on each side in a circular fashion)

I saw a very muscular man super overtighten the side supports. Caused a hairline crack at the support spots.

Overtightening fixed clamps.

Lots of other things that damage frames. Instruction manuals are nice to have, but usually used machines don't come with them. If you buy used, the seller is usually willing to teach the buyer.

VGP
09-15-2010, 06:53 AM
Well, I did say common sense.

Pulling multiple mains, stringing the mains on one side then the other, over-tightening the supports, etc. falls out of that category IMO.

As for things like getting the hang of it, avoiding misweaves, being careful with your tools, etc. that's all trial and error in building up experience.

Mind you, I did learn back in the day when the average weight of frames out on the market was 12.5 ounces with relatively thin, conventional width frames.

You're right about lighter frames with curvy profiles being more prone to damage, relatively speaking.

max
09-16-2010, 07:51 AM
^^^Todays 12 year old can probably strip down, rewire and reassemble your laptop so that it can make toast, which I'm pretty sure most adults couldn't do.

Previous generations used (played with) the technology of their time (cars, tools etc), current generations use (play) with the technology of theirs (electronics etc).

Ash

These 12 year olds don't live around me, at the least. It's an okay point you make, but the development of professionalized services, and our use of more and more complex items, tends to lead to throwing away things rather than fixing them. . . so as a group, our proficiency and use of tools, our options and abilities to do handwork on a variety of things has declined. Compare Miami to Cuba when it comes to fixing old cars. . . Necessity can be quite a teacher! :)

Centryx
09-17-2010, 09:21 AM
i just started stringing myself and i must say i learned from Youtube! from all the videos that are up helped alot now if only i could weave mains faster....started last week stringing and i can do a raquet in ~45 mins now

Jeffy005
09-17-2010, 10:25 AM
someone prob mentioned it but YuLite is a great resource on here. check out his youtubes. nothing beats having a person there to show you though

Fo sho....

Irvin
09-17-2010, 10:27 AM
Say you want to weave faster, take a look at this?

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=344134

Irvin

Power Player
09-17-2010, 11:28 AM
I have a come a long way since I started. When I started I truly thought I made a mistake buying the machine. Now I am very happy that I do not have to pay over 10 bucks to get strings done every week.

Here is one huge tip that may help. No matter what your string preference, buy synthetic gut and start with that. It is cheap, it is easy to learn with and you will break it quicker, which will force you to string more often. Going with full syn gut for a few months really helped me out with my stringing more then anything else.

mikeler
09-17-2010, 11:46 AM
I have a come a long way since I started. When I started I truly thought I made a mistake buying the machine. Now I am very happy that I do not have to pay over 10 bucks to get strings done every week.

Here is one huge tip that may help. No matter what your string preference, buy synthetic gut and start with that. It is cheap, it is easy to learn with and you will break it quicker, which will force you to string more often. Going with full syn gut for a few months really helped me out with my stringing more then anything else.


I too was very frustrated at first, but I've saved so much money now that I'm so glad I purchased mine. Definitely start out with inexpensive string like synthetic gut on the first few string jobs. It's also nice knowing that when I break a string on Saturday, I can be sure that I'll have that racket available for my Sunday match.

Irvin
09-17-2010, 12:39 PM
^^ I agree with that buy a cheap syn gut string like Gosen OG Micro. I would prefer to buy it in the reel instead of sets. The reels have less coil memory and is easier to string with. You can't beat the price either. I would suggest 17 gauge if you want practice. After a stringing about 15 or more racket you will be an expert - that is a has been drip under pressure. LOL

Irvin