PDA

View Full Version : Lock out vs. Rotational gripper


Carlito
09-18-2010, 09:40 AM
The rotational grippers are electronic and are constant pull. They are about the same price as lock out machines. Is there any reason I should avoid rotational gripper machines?

struggle
09-18-2010, 10:00 AM
which machines?

rich s
09-18-2010, 10:47 AM
The rotational grippers are electronic and are constant pull. They are about the same price as lock out machines. Is there any reason I should avoid rotational gripper machines?

I've used rotational/drum grippers and linear grippers extensively... the only upside that the linear has over the drum (IMO) is that you don't need as much string to engage the linear gripper.

The drum requires a little more string because you have to wrap the string around the drum before you put it in the slot, the linear, gripper you go straight into the slot.

From a standpoint of effectiveness.... both do the job (grip the string) equally well.

Irvin
09-18-2010, 11:39 AM
The rotational grippers are electronic and are constant pull. They are about the same price as lock out machines. Is there any reason I should avoid rotational gripper machines?

Some electronic machines do not have rotational grippers and some do. I have never seen a lockout machine that did not have a linear gripper. Most electronic machines except for the lower end machines have a linear gripper. Not sure what you are looking for.

Irvin

Carlito
09-18-2010, 06:05 PM
Just to clarify, I am debating between an Eagnas manual crank and an Eagnas electronic rotational gripper. I am a strong believer and constant pull machines but I can justify spending over $500 for a machine. I only pay $10 to get rackets strung on a fancy machine at the shop and I don't play that much any more. I probably go through 20 string jobs a year and have no plans to string other people's racket.

I can get a machine with an electronic rotational gripper or one with a crank for about the same price. Any reason to avoid the rotational gripper?

rich s
09-18-2010, 07:46 PM
Just to clarify, I am debating between an Eagnas manual crank and an Eagnas electronic rotational gripper. I am a strong believer and constant pull machines but I can justify spending over $500 for a machine. I only pay $10 to get rackets strung on a fancy machine at the shop and I don't play that much any more. I probably go through 20 string jobs a year and have no plans to string other people's racket.

I can get a machine with an electronic rotational gripper or one with a crank for about the same price. Any reason to avoid the rotational gripper?

I wouldn't get an Eagnas, but if budget limits you to Eagnas, I'd get a crank and not an electronic. There are a few people around who have Eagnas cranks that seem to be happy with them, maybe one will recommend a model...... I think the Flex 940 is pretty popular but I'm not 100% sure.

If your budget allows it at all, consider a Gamma or Alpha crank, you will be much better off with the quality of the machine and the support from their respective companies.

Centered
09-18-2010, 08:06 PM
I was reading a stringing forum's posts yesterday and one person was looking for a machine with a $1000 budget and people were saying that anything in that range is a "toy".

Of course, one of them was thinking of buying a Babolat 5502, or had one. lol

Some of us don't have thousands to spend on a stringing machine, but if those folks are to be believed, not even a $1000 Stringway ML100 is anything but a toy. Well, I don't have the funds for such a "toy". I guess we poh fok hav te settle fo de toiz, and cruddy string jobs -- if this is the case.

I hope they're wrong, because I will probably never have $5000 to drop on a stringing machine.

PBODY99
09-19-2010, 06:08 AM
In the price range you are looking at, I would stay away from the electronic machine. A crank is a simple set up, less to go wrong.. At 20 frames a year a fixed clamp drop weight from the same vendor gives you constant pull and less chance for headaches down the road.

struggle
09-19-2010, 06:31 AM
eagnas combo 910 seems to be the best bang for the buck (lockout) and
also seems to get many positive reviews. i have one and am happy with it.

otherwise, i'd go with one of the "higher end" manufacturers.

Carlito
09-19-2010, 07:33 AM
Any comments on the Eagnas rotational gripper? I know they have a bad reputation, but I work close to there warehose so if there is a problem, I can just swing on by.

Irvin
09-19-2010, 08:01 AM
Any comments on the Eagnas rotational gripper? I know they have a bad reputation, but I work close to there warehose so if there is a problem, I can just swing on by.

LOL Just because you are close and can swing right by there does not mean you are going to get anything done.

Irvin

struggle
09-19-2010, 08:46 AM
Any comments on the Eagnas rotational gripper? I know they have a bad reputation, but I work close to there warehose so if there is a problem, I can just swing on by.

i have not heard any good things.

several people are happy with their WISE tension heads.
you could get a decent lockout now and buy a wise later
if you wish.

don't get hungup on constant pull, but if you are i'd
likely consider a dropweight machine (at your pricepoint).
instead of an eagnas cheap electronic.

even the eagnas challenger I looks quite adequate.

my .02

Donny0627
09-19-2010, 12:34 PM
yea at 20 rackets a year i would get something like a gamma 602FC II. Its froma reputable company and has fixed clamps...

onefromcov
09-19-2010, 01:41 PM
I owned an eagnas smart 3000 for 5 years,I found the tension being pulled was very inconsistant,it could be as far out as 4lb on consectutive pulls.A drop weight or good lockout would be the best bet.Even

mad dog1
09-19-2010, 04:05 PM
i owned the eagnas flex 865s which had the rotational gripper. it was a constant pull model. worked fine. pulled very consistent tension. i measured the tension using an ultrasport scale. it was spot on on consecutive pulls. it was a bit difficult to calibrate, but once it was, it was quite consistent.

Rabbit
09-20-2010, 04:47 AM
Just to clarify, I am debating between an Eagnas manual crank and an Eagnas electronic rotational gripper. I am a strong believer and constant pull machines but I can justify spending over $500 for a machine. I only pay $10 to get rackets strung on a fancy machine at the shop and I don't play that much any more. I probably go through 20 string jobs a year and have no plans to string other people's racket.

I can get a machine with an electronic rotational gripper or one with a crank for about the same price. Any reason to avoid the rotational gripper?

I think you've answered your own question. Given the circumstances around your stringing now and the fact that you're looking at a machine which doesn't get much in the way of respect, I might stay with your current situation and pay $10/stringjob which is done on a "fancy machine". That sounds like the best of the deal.

struggle
09-20-2010, 11:36 AM
i just saw a great deal on craigslist for $50. wish i'd have seen it a few months back. keep your eyes peeled.

Racer41c
09-20-2010, 11:53 AM
Just to clarify, I am debating between an Eagnas manual crank and an Eagnas electronic rotational gripper. I am a strong believer and constant pull machines but I can justify spending over $500 for a machine. I only pay $10 to get rackets strung on a fancy machine at the shop and I don't play that much any more. I probably go through 20 string jobs a year and have no plans to string other people's racket.

I can get a machine with an electronic rotational gripper or one with a crank for about the same price. Any reason to avoid the rotational gripper?

If you don't have a clear cut reason, why buy a machine?

86golf
09-26-2010, 11:24 AM
Continue paying the $10 labor for stringing but start looking for a used -good name brand machine like a Neos or Gamma etc. that are used in pro shops. This will allow you to buy a good machine and if things don't work out, you can sell it and only lose 5% or so of the value. If you buy a new machine and it doesn't work out, you will lose 50% of the value.

To answer your original question, the rotational gripper constant pull is the better option in my opinion all things being equal. You don't have a good business driver for buying a machine, so just take your time and wait for an opportunity to pick up a good used one. In a lot of cases, you can buy a used one, use it for two years and sell it for no loss.