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MuscleWeave
09-26-2010, 02:57 PM
When string tensions are quoted, especially for a given frame, are we talking about constant pull numbers or lockout numbers?

Thank you
MW

struggle
09-26-2010, 03:46 PM
either, or...

jim e
09-26-2010, 04:38 PM
When string tensions are quoted, especially for a given frame, are we talking about constant pull numbers or lockout numbers?

Thank you
MW
I'm sure that all depends on who you are talking to.(Unless specified the type of machine being used).

MuscleWeave
09-27-2010, 08:26 AM
I'm sure that all depends on who you are talking to.(Unless specified the type of machine being used).

So is the Dunlop 55-65 tension implied for constant pull or lockout? I have an Alpha dropweight machine that tensions 4 lb. tighter than an NEOS lockout machine. On my dropweight for my Dunlop racquets, should I stop at 61 or is 65 the limit?

Thnks in advance
MW

struggle
09-27-2010, 08:39 AM
i'd venture to say that, properly calibrated, either machine is going to pull the "same" tension initially, but the constant pull machines will maintain that tension whereas the lockout will not.

therefore, based on that assumption, i'd say it doesn't matter which type of machine/tension.....BUT choose your "playing" tension based on the type of machine you are using (ie: losing 4 pounds on a lockout).

i don't think the racket will really care so long as you stay close to/within the highest end of the recommended tension range.

MuscleWeave
09-27-2010, 09:22 AM
i'd venture to say that, properly calibrated, either machine is going to pull the "same" tension initially, but the constant pull machines will maintain that tension whereas the lockout will not.

therefore, based on that assumption, i'd say it doesn't matter which type of machine/tension.....BUT choose your "playing" tension based on the type of machine you are using (ie: losing 4 pounds on a lockout).

i don't think the racket will really care so long as you stay close to/within the highest end of the recommended tension range.

Thanks tbuggle. I'll be sure to ask people I string for in the future what type of machine was used previously.

drakulie
09-27-2010, 09:28 AM
Thanks tbuggle. I'll be sure to ask people I string for in the future what type of machine was used previously.


This is what I do for all new customers, and then adjust accordingly.

struggle
09-27-2010, 09:42 AM
Thanks tbuggle. I'll be sure to ask people I string for in the future what type of machine was used previously.


5-10% seems to the recommended difference (whether up or down, pending the machine types). that also assumes that both machines are properly calibrated.

while debatable, your dropweight machine should be close to "on the money" due to it's nature (gravity fed tension). the neos you are referring to.....who knows? if it's "calibrated", then you are nearly comparing apples to apples, minus the constant pull issue.

try to remove as many variables as possible, then go from there.

TennezSport
09-27-2010, 09:50 AM
This is a major issue when stringing racquets as there are differences in the final result, by string machine and stringers technique. That is why the target tension is referred to as the "Reference Tension". The tension you get is the "Actual Tension". Other things can have an effect on the actual tension, like string pattern, stiffness index or if the string was pre-stretched or not.

From what I was taught and have experienced, drop weight machines produce the smoothest and most accurate string tensions if performed correctly. Linear Constant Pull machines come in at a very close second, are easier to use and faster. However, the jerking motion can be a problem with poly string if not pulled slow enough. Crank machines work well but can have a +4-10lb difference since they do not make up for string creep like CP machines do.

Technique is just as important and can overcome some of the short falls of crank machines if you know what to do. So it's important to know how the racquet was previously strung, if the customer knows.

Cheers, TennezSport :cool:

Rabbit
09-27-2010, 09:54 AM
^^^^^
Great post.

That's one thing I really like about the Wise tension head. It has two modes, lockout and constant pull. This allows you to adjust tension for someone.

For instance, if someone comes in wanting a frame strung at 54, I can set the tension head at 54 in lockout mode, pull tension, then count to 5 (let's say). All the while, the tension is dropping to 48.
So, I can set the tension head at 48, and in constant pull mode and voila. I've made an adjustment which will get them very close to what they had. The big difference is that the tension pulls will be more consistent than they would otherwise.