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POGO
06-02-2005, 07:23 AM
I played a match last night, and during the middle of a rally my string popped. The center cross string popped. While playing with the broken string, I was able to hit some wicked top spins, almost a kick serve where the ball goes to one direction and bounces in another direction. I kept hitting like this until I won the point.

My opponet stated that it was illegal that the momment I popped the string the game must stop and replay the point.

He stated that playing with a broken string is like playing with a racket strung spegetti (sp) stringing because of the unpredictable spin one can hit with.

So what are the rules exactly about this?

Is he right?

TwistServe
06-02-2005, 07:35 AM
Hhaah thats a complete joke.. You can play with a broken string if you want, even after the point.

Remember in the olympics, Moya vesus Massu! Massu broke a string on match point and started pushing the ball back. Moya is so nervious he just pushes the ball back too! Then moya moves into the net try to end the point, and Massu hits a sweet passing shot with the broken string!

POGO
06-02-2005, 07:38 AM
I knew it. He was giving me some BS because he was loosing ;)

python
06-02-2005, 07:51 AM
I don't have a copy of the Code in front of me, but I believe your opponent is correct. You may not continue to play with a racquet with broken strings if you have a replacement available on the court. However, if it is your ONLY racquet, it is permitted. It sounds oddball, huh?

Loofah
06-02-2005, 08:10 AM
He is wrong. From the Rules of Tennis:

Case 4: During a point, a player accidentally breaks the strings. Can the
player continue to play another point with this racket?
Decision: Yes, except where specifically prohibited by event organisers.

AndrewD
06-02-2005, 08:13 AM
As a registered umpire of a good 13 years standing I can state categorically that there is nothing at all illegal in playing with a broken string. There is also no ruling that says you have to change your racquet, even if one is available to you. Of course, you'd want to change your racquet but you are not obliged to do so.

If the string breaks during a point you can't call a let or do anything other than play the point out. If it happens on a first serve and the ball goes in, your opponent has to play it, as do you. If the serve is a fault (which it almost always is) you don't get to 'play two', its just a fault.

The Moya/Massu match is the prime example. If there was any law against playing with a broken string the chair umpire would have called a let, forced Massu to change racquets and had them replay the point.

If anyone tries to pull that kind of stunt again ask them if they consider your playing with a broken string, therefore no control, is a hindrance to them or to yourself. Im sure their explanation will be worth a laugh.


Loofah's example is an interesting one.
While it relates directly to strings it is unlikely to be enforced by event organisers regarding a broken string but could tempt them if the player was playing with a broken racquet. In that situation they would apply the same law and ask him/her to change to a new frame. Still, 13 years and 17 GS tournaments later Ive never seen anyone tempted, even when Ivanisevic and Safin were in the same draw LOL.

finchy
06-02-2005, 09:16 AM
sure you can hit/play with a racquet with broken strings, but doesnt it damage the frame's structure? i remember reading something that it causes improper balance of tension of the strings which increases the stress in some parts or the racquet.

POGO
06-02-2005, 09:27 AM
sure you can hit/play with a racquet with broken strings, but doesnt it damage the frame's structure? i remember reading something that it causes improper balance of tension of the strings which increases the stress in some parts or the racquet.
Yes, I'm sure it can damage the racket.

But, the string broke during a middle of a long rally. To my amazment, I was hitting all these wierd spins on both wings and making my opponent off his timing which is probably why he brought up that it was illegal to play with a broken string due to the unpredictable spins I was hitting him.

I eventually won that game and the match ;)

python
06-02-2005, 12:16 PM
There was a famous example of where Goran Ivanesevic, suffering from tendonitis, cut the strings on his racquets during a match to lower the tension. Goran was forced to default when the umpire told him he could not play with the altered racquets, and he did not have a uncut frame available to use.

Maybe it is an ATP rule? AndrewD, have you heard of the Goran match?

USCfan
06-02-2005, 12:22 PM
Now that is one cool avatar POGO...

POGO
06-02-2005, 12:31 PM
Now that is one cool avatar POGO...
Gee thanks!!!! Its a cat doing the POGO :)

Bora
06-02-2005, 12:33 PM
Hey POGO, how did you manage to break Aramid strings? ;)

POGO
06-02-2005, 12:41 PM
Hey POGO, how did you manage to break Aramid strings? ;)
Hhahahahha. I guess my heman over powering forehand was too much. hhehehe... :)

The mains, the kevlar, did not snap, It was the soft synthetic cross that broke. The kevlar ate through the cross string.

Bora
06-02-2005, 01:29 PM
Uh, I heard those kevlar strings were hungry buggers. You should feed them more often :p

Fuzzless
06-02-2005, 01:31 PM
a broken string would likely give you some extra power.

USCfan, does the USC in your name stand for a college or for a prosperous high school in PA?

AndrewD
06-02-2005, 03:18 PM
There was a famous example of where Goran Ivanesevic, suffering from tendonitis, cut the strings on his racquets during a match to lower the tension. Goran was forced to default when the umpire told him he could not play with the altered racquets, and he did not have a uncut frame available to use.

Maybe it is an ATP rule? AndrewD, have you heard of the Goran match?

That match actually serves as a perfect illustration of the rule Loofah mentioned. The reason why the umpire (not sure if it was of his own volition or told to by the tournament ref) asked Ivanisevic to change racquets was because he had deliberately altered the constitution of the string bed by cutting the strings, not having them break naturally.
However, if Goran had wanted to contest the ruling Im pretty sure he would have won. I would also wonder how old is the rule Loofah mentioned. Not all of the rules and regulations in tennis have been around since day one. Some of them have arisen due to the enormous problems umpires and officials had in the 70's, 80's and early 90's controlling matches (there were some 'awkward' personalities in those days).
Also, you have to remember that, as with any laws, they're subject to interpretation. We did consider the chair umpire in the Ivanisevic situation to have overreacted. The ruling could be made in the way he did but it felt more like a knee-jerk reaction and perhaps came from a suspicion that in cutting the strings Goran wasn't giving the match 100%. Tanking is illegal and he might have put 2 and 2 together and got 7.