PDA

View Full Version : always the natural gut is the best string choice for all rackets??


Speedy_tennis
06-02-2005, 05:25 PM
always the natural gut is the best string choice for all rackets??

Gaines Hillix
06-02-2005, 05:30 PM
Not all players or stringers think so. There is still a lot of natural gut being used on tour, but with modern racquets it can be hard to control its power. That's why players like Roger Federer are using nat gut in the mains and Lux ALU Power Rough in the crosses to help tame its power a little. It is second to none in power, comfort, touch and friendliness to ones arm, however. Another factor is the cost. Not everyone wants to or can afford to pay up to $60 for a nat gut string job. This has also driven the use of hybrids. One can get 90% of the feel of a full gut job by using gut in the mains and a much cheaper syn gut string in the crosses.

kinsella
06-02-2005, 06:08 PM
Of course, Gaines is correct. For a long time, until about 5 years ago, you needed to string a player's racquet with gut to evaluate its design in its intended environment. Babolat Pure Drives were not designed to use VS Gut, IMHO, but surely Pro Staff 6.0s and 6.1s were, as were most Fishers and many Volkls and Yonex racquets. The POG designers surely evaluated their prototypes with natural gut. Ditto the Head PCs and many more Heads. Dunlop 200s, too. I know I am leaving out many, but you get the point.

Personally, I don't "get" why players would purposely use a racquet so powerful that he or she needed stiff and dead strings in it to control the ball. To my way of thinking, a racquet whose power needs the boost of gut shows more respect for your joints.

I wonder if when graphite racquet first showed up experts predicted that injuries would bring players back to wood? Still, I do expect that shoulder, elbow and wrist problems will eventually drive big hitting players away from the light, stiff racquets strung with poly-something at high tension. I guess we'll see. In addition, the kinds of swing mechanics that very stiff and light racquets permit are harder on the rest of body. Tennis is hard enough on the body, already!

To get back to the original question, the best way to find out if you and your stick are gut-starved is to take the plunge and get your stick strung with gut. Gaines is correct, again, that you get most of the gut benefit by using gut mains with an inexpensive synthetic cross (and save a bundle). I think you also improve durability, because the synthetic is not as harsh to the gut as gut would be to itself.

Good luck.

Pushmaster
06-02-2005, 06:23 PM
I'd say natural gut is the way to go with most (if not all) players racquets I've played. I had been stringing my Prestige Tour mids w/BDE Performance but decided to try NRG2, and for me the difference is night and day. With nat gut these frames are awesome, great feel, bigger sweetspot and more predictable stringbed response, soft but crisp, and MUCH easier on the arm than the synthetic gut. I could go on and on, but once you get used to nat gut, nothing less will do.

bee
06-02-2005, 07:13 PM
Use Babolat VS 17 Team Gut with Babolat String Savers. Spoiled! Everything else feels harsh to me now. The string savers tame the gut just a little (somewhat like a hybrid...but just somewhat). They keep the strings from moving as much, so stiffen it a little for more spin generation. Gut with a little more Bite!

federer_nadal
06-03-2005, 11:38 PM
I just strung up babolat twin tour gut , its my first gut, i stilll have the sorest shoulder from my flexpoint rad tour but it is the best string in the world. Luckily i can get it cheap

Gaines Hillix
06-04-2005, 06:09 AM
Of course, Gaines is correct. For a long time, until about 5 years ago, you needed to string a player's racquet with gut to evaluate its design in its intended environment. Babolat Pure Drives were not designed to use VS Gut, IMHO, but surely Pro Staff 6.0s and 6.1s were, as were most Fishers and many Volkls and Yonex racquets. The POG designers surely evaluated their prototypes with natural gut. Ditto the Head PCs and many more Heads. Dunlop 200s, too. I know I am leaving out many, but you get the point.

Personally, I don't "get" why players would purposely use a racquet so powerful that he or she needed stiff and dead strings in it to control the ball. To my way of thinking, a racquet whose power needs the boost of gut shows more respect for your joints.

I wonder if when graphite racquet first showed up experts predicted that injuries would bring players back to wood? Still, I do expect that shoulder, elbow and wrist problems will eventually drive big hitting players away from the light, stiff racquets strung with poly-something at high tension. I guess we'll see. In addition, the kinds of swing mechanics that very stiff and light racquets permit are harder on the rest of body. Tennis is hard enough on the body, already!

To get back to the original question, the best way to find out if you and your stick are gut-starved is to take the plunge and get your stick strung with gut. Gaines is correct, again, that you get most of the gut benefit by using gut mains with an inexpensive synthetic cross (and save a bundle). I think you also improve durability, because the synthetic is not as harsh to the gut as gut would be to itself.

Good luck.

John makes a good point about the effect of using poly strings to tame today's super powerful racquets. Albert Lee mentioned a resurgance of full gut string jobs at the NASDAQ tourny in Miami earlier this spring. He said there was still plenty of poly being used, but the percentage of full gut jobs was higher than he'd been seeing.

twocents
06-04-2005, 06:47 AM
Gaines,
What do you think is the best Gut for the Price, playability, and durabiliity?
I just bought an AeroPRo "PLUS". Would you recommend using a hybrid instead? (i am rated a 4.0 benchmark)
THANKS