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Power Player
10-05-2010, 08:32 AM
I have been stringing full poly on my drop weight at 52#s. Is it safe to assume that the tension is probably around 48? Or is the dropweight so accurate that it really is at 52? I have always wondered if there is a definitive answer to this.

struggle
10-05-2010, 08:43 AM
should be accurate (gravity) less any stretch after you clamp, tie of etc.

got a calibrator?

wrxtotoro
10-05-2010, 08:48 AM
Drop weight is very accurate as long as your technique is good and consistent. Like all constant pull machine, the string will continue to stretch and lose some elasticity overtime. So (1) if you lower the weight/bar to tension a string (without clamping it) and (2) go and have a coffee for 10 min and then (3) come back to continue the string job and readjust the bar to the horizontal position, that specific string would have a higher stiffness as some elasticity has been taken out already. If you wait like 3 min before you clamp the string for EVERY single pull, my guess is that the final overall stringbed stiffness would be higher than the output of a similar stringjob with 20s wait time.

Just be consistent and clamp the string like 10s-15s after the bar become horizontal for every single string. Your result would be comparible to, if not better than, some high end electronic machine. Afterall gravity is constant at a constant altitude. You only have to calibrate it once (jsut in case the sticker is at the wrong position) and you will never have to do it again.

Power Player
10-05-2010, 09:51 AM
Nice post. I will do that..wait 10seconds or so before clamping.

I am starting the mains differently now, and I think this helps. I pull both in the gripper the first time..not to where the bar is dropping all the way, just to put tension on them and clamp. I then pull one to tension and clamp outside the frame with a starting clamp. Then I pull the other main to tension and clamp again.

This seems to be the most consistent way to start the mains properly on a dropweight machine.

dgdawg
10-05-2010, 09:57 AM
I have been stringing full poly on my drop weight at 52#s. Is it safe to assume that the tension is probably around 48? Or is the dropweight so accurate that it really is at 52? I have always wondered if there is a definitive answer to this.

There are a lot of variables. As mentioned above, consistency is the main thing.
On a d/w, 1° in either direction will alter the tension, as well as the amount of time taken to clamp off, and release tension. Also, fixed vs. floating clamps will effect tension as well.

tball
10-08-2010, 07:10 PM
Consistency should not be a problem when stringing poly. It does not stretch.
With soft strings, on a dropweight, you may find that the weight never quiet settles. It visibly stretches for about 1 minute, and if you let it pull beyond 1 minute, you will find out it streched even more (but it gets harder to notice, as stretching gets slower). Exact timing with these types of strings will be important.

dgdawg
10-08-2010, 07:21 PM
Consistency should not be a problem when stringing poly. It does not stretch.
With soft strings, on a dropweight, you may find that the weight never quiet settles. It visibly stretches for about 1 minute, and if you let it pull beyond 1 minute, you will find out it streched even more (but it gets harder to notice, as stretching gets slower). Exact timing with these types of strings will be important.

hmmm.....Polies absolutely stretch.
They just stretch at a lower rate. Is that what you meant?
I'm assuming that letting your d/w arm pull a string for a minute, it's an experiment.

dgdawg
10-08-2010, 07:35 PM
Drop weight is very accurate as long as your technique is good and consistent. Like all constant pull machine, the string will continue to stretch and lose some elasticity overtime. So (1) if you lower the weight/bar to tension a string (without clamping it) and (2) go and have a coffee for 10 min and then (3) come back to continue the string job and readjust the bar to the horizontal position, that specific string would have a higher stiffness as some elasticity has been taken out already. If you wait like 3 min before you clamp the string for EVERY single pull, my guess is that the final overall stringbed stiffness would be higher than the output of a similar stringjob with 20s wait time.

Just be consistent and clamp the string like 10s-15s after the bar become horizontal for every single string. Your result would be comparible to, if not better than, some high end electronic machine. Afterall gravity is constant at a constant altitude. You only have to calibrate it once (jsut in case the sticker is at the wrong position) and you will never have to do it again.

If you wait 10 or 15 seconds to clamp, wouldn't that take a lot of elasticity out of the string?
Also, waiting that long, wouldn't the tensioning bar be below 90°, at which point, the tension bar wouldn't be pulling at the determined tension?
Not sure I'd suggest waiting any length of time before clamping.
Personally, I would recommend clamping asap, and do your best to maintain that constancy throughout.

Kevo
10-08-2010, 09:37 PM
I have been stringing full poly on my drop weight at 52#s. Is it safe to assume that the tension is probably around 48? Or is the dropweight so accurate that it really is at 52? I have always wondered if there is a definitive answer to this.

Well, with a dropweight the tension should be accurate when the bar is horizontal. As soon as you clamp, the string starts to lose tension. So it will never be 52 again. It will continue to lose tension over time, with most of the tension loss happening soon after stringing and the loss diminishing over time.

So basically, you should not worry so much about this question. It's something you can't do anything about. What you should concern yourself with is learning to string in a consistent fashion so you can get repeatable results.

dgdawg
10-08-2010, 09:39 PM
Well, with a dropweight the tension should be accurate when the bar is horizontal. As soon as you clamp, the string starts to lose tension. So it will never be 52 again. It will continue to lose tension over time, with most of the tension loss happening soon after stringing and the loss diminishing over time.

So basically, you should not worry so much about this question. It's something you can't do anything about. What you should concern yourself with is learning to string in a consistent fashion so you can get repeatable results.

>>>>>>>BINGO<<<<<<

Technatic
10-08-2010, 10:40 PM
This is about the same discussion as in the thread about the crank.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=351720

If you look at the graphs in that discussion you can see how long different strings keep stretching. Most of the elongation has occurred 15 seconds after the set tension is reached.

it is very easy to see if the string strill stretches on a dropweight: When the arm does not move anymore all the elongation is out of the string and the string will not elongate anymore after clamping.
If you clamp too fast you loose, that is why they say:

A fast stringer is a soft stringer!

A nice trick to avoid loss of tension is to insert the next string while the tensionier is still pulling.

The important thing about this is that elasticity remains and the remaining elongation (that does not recover) is pulled out.


This graph shows the principle of stretching strings.

http://img697.imageshack.us/img697/9959/stringelongation2.jpg

dgdawg
10-09-2010, 06:14 AM
This is about the same discussion as in the thread about the crank.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=351720

If you look at the graphs in that discussion you can see how long different strings keep stretching. Most of the elongation has occurred 15 seconds after the set tension is reached.

it is very easy to see if the string strill stretches on a dropweight: When the arm does not move anymore all the elongation is out of the string and the string will not elongate anymore after clamping.
If you clamp too fast you loose, that is why they say:

A fast stringer is a soft stringer!

A nice trick to avoid loss of tension is to insert the next string while the tensionier is still pulling.

The important thing about this is that elasticity remains and the remaining elongation (that does not recover) is pulled out.


This graph shows the principle of stretching strings.

http://img697.imageshack.us/img697/9959/stringelongation2.jpg

Technatic....Let me guess, you're an engineer?
What you suggest, 10 to 15 seconds before clamping, would be the equivalent of a 15 or 20% electronic pre stretch. Doing this, you're taking away the playability of a quality string. Why pay $15 for X-1 Biphase when you've taken all the elasticity out of it. You may as well play with a 2x8 and save your money.
The tension you set on a machine, no mater what type of tensioning system it has, is called "reference tension" for a reason.
I understand where you're coming from, and I see where you're going.

This is a discussion, which is what makes public forums so valuable.
I've mentioned before that I mean no disrespect and I never want to be offensive, I just want to reiterate this.

I've read numerous discussions about this topic in the past. I think these types of discussions are detrimental to the development of inexperience stringers.
When I first started stringing, my friend (a pro shop owner) told me "you can't listen to anything you read on the web"
I disagreed with him, to a point. I told him you learn a lot from the web. It's up to the individual to ascertain the validity of what he/she will retain as useful. I believe this is the type of discussion my friend was referring to.
The second you start to introduce X's into the equasion, you are now starting to alter the tension of the M,s. M string tension will increase due to the "deflection" produced by weaving and tensioning X's. Reference tension of the X's will be reduced due to the friction of the M's. How do you measure that?
Whatever reference tension you're pulling X's, you'll never maintain due to the resistance from the M's, AND, the type of string will dictate the amount of resistance you get from the M's.

Technatic..maybe I'm whack, and I have this all wrong. Maybe I'm thinking of this sideways. If someone like Albert Lee, or Richard Parnell chimes in and says: "dawg, your an idiot" I'll rethink my position, but I don't think I'm too far off. I've maintained all along, I'm not a G.O.A.T. and I don't think I know everything. I'm a long way from that. I do think I know something about the "craft" and a lot of my knowledge came for this site, among others. This and stringing a few thousand frames.
In the beginning, this is one of the posts I would not have paid heed to.
Consistency is key!!!
Again...this is my opinion......
Maybe someone can straighten me out?

Kevo
10-09-2010, 07:52 AM
The other part of this is related to the type of string and it's ability to maintain elasticity at a certain tension.

Often when I cut out nylon strings there is still some elasticity left in the string. They may snap apart a few inches when cut. With Polys it's often a few millimeters.

If you string a poly at 40lbs. and let it sit until it no longer stretches you will be losing feel potential from the string. I think in order to get the widest possible range of options from a set of reasonable reference tensions you should not try to remove all elongation from the string at a specific tension. I think you should try to tension and clamp in a consistent way in a reasonable time frame so that all strings can be done similarly.

I think in theory it should be possible to produce the same results using both techniques at two different tensions. For instance, say I let each string sit for 1 min before clamping on one stringing and for 5 sec on another. I may need to string the first job at 30 lbs. to produce the same result as the second job at 55lbs. This is just an example, but I think the 5 seconds gives you more options for results. In other words the, "let it sit until the string no longer stretches" technique would compress the range of playable reference tensions. At least that's my theory.

dgdawg
10-09-2010, 08:07 AM
The other part of this is related to the type of string and it's ability to maintain elasticity at a certain tension.

Often when I cut out nylon strings there is still some elasticity left in the string. They may snap apart a few inches when cut. With Polys it's often a few millimeters.

If you string a poly at 40lbs. and let it sit until it no longer stretches you will be losing feel potential from the string. I think in order to get the widest possible range of options from a set of reasonable reference tensions you should not try to remove all elongation from the string at a specific tension. I think you should try to tension and clamp in a consistent way in a reasonable time frame so that all strings can be done similarly.

I think in theory it should be possible to produce the same results using both techniques at two different tensions. For instance, say I let each string sit for 1 min before clamping on one stringing and for 5 sec on another. I may need to string the first job at 30 lbs. to produce the same result as the second job at 55lbs. This is just an example, but I think the 5 seconds gives you more options for results. In other words the, "let it sit until the string no longer stretches" technique would compress the range of playable reference tensions. At least that's my theory.

This is what I was actually trying to convey in my long winded explanation. This is why I pre stretch ONLY upon request.
If you're stringing only for yourself, do what ever makes you happy.

Technatic
10-09-2010, 11:03 AM
Technatic....Let me guess, you're an engineer?
What you suggest, 10 to 15 seconds before clamping, would be the equivalent of a 15 or 20% electronic pre stretch. Doing this, you're taking away the playability of a quality string. Why pay $15 for X-1 Biphase when you've taken all the elasticity out of it. You may as well play with a 2x8 and save your money.
The tension you set on a machine, no mater what type of tensioning system it has, is called "reference tension" for a reason.
I understand where you're coming from, and I see where you're going.


Thanks dgdawg in this way we have something to talk about in the weekend.
And you are not allowed to guess again; I am a retired engineer.

About the matter of tensioning in different ways:

No, 10 to 15 seconds waiting is certainly not the same as pre-stretching by 15 to 20 %. I would like to explain what actually happens when a string is tensioned:

As you can see in the graph the total elongation in a strings consists of an elastic part and a remaining part, the elastic elongation recovers after releasing the tension but the remaining part is the increase in length of the string.
This system works at any tension that you use.

So when you pull tension on your machine and you wait 15 seconds both elongations for that tension have been achieved. The higher the tension the more elastic and remaining elongation.

When you clamp before all the elongation is there, part of the remaining elongation will occur after clamping which will result in a loss of tension.

What happens when you pre-stretch a string ( at a higher tension than the stringing tension)?
Let’s say that you string on 50 lbs and you pre-stretch on the machine at 57,5 lbs. This means that you pull the remaining elongation out of the string at 57.5 lbs and then go back to 50.
This means that the string has become a stiffer string at 50 lbs and will loose less tension.

So the difference between waiting 15 seconds and pre-stretching 15 % is that the pre-stretched string is stiffer than the other one.

What about the “stretch-system” in the string during play?
Let us assume that you string at 50 lbs, meaning that the tesion in the mains will be higher and in the crosses lower than 50 lbs.

When the first balls hit the stringbed the string will stretch and the tension will rise above the tension after stringing. This means that the remaining elongation that belongs to the higher tension will occur and the string looses a little bit tension.
Because the time is very short it takes a number of hits to create all the remaining elongation that belongs to the higher tension for this string.

A string with more remaining elongation will loose more tension during play then a string with less remaining elongation.

The table below shows the test results that Verbouge achieved with different strings. As you can see the difference in remaining elongation is huge.

http://img822.imageshack.us/img822/1258/stringtestsdave2klj.jpg

Finally I think that everybody on the forum has some knowledge and by sharing it on the forums we all get wiser.

Technatic
10-09-2010, 11:29 AM
I think in theory it should be possible to produce the same results using both techniques at two different tensions. For instance, say I let each string sit for 1 min before clamping on one stringing and for 5 sec on another. I may need to string the first job at 30 lbs. to produce the same result as the second job at 55lbs. This is just an example, but I think the 5 seconds gives you more options for results. In other words the, "let it sit until the string no longer stretches" technique would compress the range of playable reference tensions. At least that's my theory.

This is an interesting thought and at the same time you show the weakness of crank machines and the big advantage of CP dropweights with this thought:
I would like to illustrate this thought with the help of some graphs. These graphs the tension in a string on a crank machine.
As you can see the tension in the upper string drops 17,6 lbs and in the lower one 11 lbs.
More then 10 seconds after reaching the set tension on the machine the tension hardly drops anymore so all the elongation has been achieved.

If you combine this with the message in the last post it means that a string is always pre-stretched on crank.
This means that the actual playability is always less then when the same string is tensioned at the final tension in the crank with a CP drop weight system.

The well known James Bond on this forum has explained already that you kill the string (and certainly monos) on a crank machine.

http://img509.imageshack.us/img509/5215/lockoutnylonskl.jpg

Kevo
10-09-2010, 05:31 PM
If you combine this with the message in the last post it means that a string is always pre-stretched on crank.
This means that the actual playability is always less then when the same string is tensioned at the final tension in the crank with a CP drop weight system.

The well known James Bond on this forum has explained already that you kill the string (and certainly monos) on a crank machine.

I see where you're going here, but I'm not sure it's quite the same. It would seem to me that with a crank, what is happening is quite different from a CP machine. For one thing, the length of string that is being tensioned is only at the desired tension for a split moment, and the length that is clamped is never at the reference tension. So to say it is pre-stretched is sort of true and sort of not. It is actually under-stretched. This means that more of the strings elasticity is available in the final product. This could be good or bad depending on what you like.

In a CP machine, you could say that it is over stretched since each tensioned length of string is more than what is clamped. So every string after the first will be tensioned, at least partially, twice. With the crank the string never really is stretched beyond the initial pull to the reference.

That's why this stringing thing is a tricky business. I personally think for some multis a crank might be better. I like the mushy lower powered feel of something like NXT strung on a crank. On a CP you don't get that same kind of feel. I use polys mostly and played with Kevlar for a long time, so I like the more dead feel of a poly so I tend to prefer CP.

For something like a nylon syn gut, I don't think it matters as much as those strings tend to be more consistent over all. This is just my personal experience, and I don't have charts to back it up.

Wouldn't be cool if you could add a mechanism on a dropweight like the Stringways that would turn it into a lockout. Some kind of motion latch that would lock when the bar slows down to less than a pre-determined speed. Then you could have both options on a nice portable machine.

Technatic
10-09-2010, 09:36 PM
Good morning Kevo,

That's why this stringing thing is a tricky business.
You are certainly right in this.

I would like to look at it differently;
The final tension in the upper graph is about 53 lbs coming from 67 lbs.
So the Stringbed stiffness matches the tension of 53 lbs.

To achieve this on a CP machine the set tension should be 53 lbs because the system does not need any “overpull” to compensate for loss. As you can see in the graph the tension on the CP machine is never higher than the final tension.
The graph also shows how accurate a CP drop weight pulls compared to a high end electronic machine.

http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/5425/autdropelecklm.jpg

So the crank machine has to pull 67 lbs to get 53 in the racquet with this string and the string has been prestretched to 67 lbs before going to the 53.

As you can see in the table monos have more remaining elongation and less elastic elongation resulting in a lower quality index.
So when you overstretch a mono you pull more remaining elongation out of the string and less elastic elongation is left.

When the player hits a ball he feels the total elongation (el+re) so he feels a much stiffer string if it is prestretched so high.

http://img409.imageshack.us/img409/8910/stringtestsdave3kll.jpg

You are right that the difference in feel with a multi like the Syn Gut will be much smaller because the remaining elongation that is pulled out is much smaller and more elastic elongation is left.
The Polystar strings will be completely dead if you us a crank though.

So you get a different feel when you string on a crank than on a CP.and the difference will be bigger with strings that stretch more.

You can notice that a string is stiffer after the first pull when you pull again on your machine.
That is why you should not move the clamp when you have to do a second pull, you need less travel for the second pull.

I do not see any advantage in crank systems I agree with James Bond when he says that a cranks completely kill monos.James strings only monos but does that on low tensions in order to maintain the playability.

I like the mushy lower powered feel of something like NXT strung on a crank. On a CP you don't get that same kind of feel. I use polys mostly and played with Kevlar for a long time, so I like the more dead feel of a poly so I tend to prefer CP.


The reason that monos offer more control is in the fact that the elastic elongation is much smaller, so the catapult effect is also smaller also.

Technatic
10-09-2010, 09:53 PM
Interesting conclusion out of this discussion could be:

It is difficult to string accurately without knowing the specs of the strings.
This discussion may be interesting for those who want to read more about that.

http://www.stringforum.net/board/showthread.php?t=3655

dgdawg
10-10-2010, 08:46 AM
Interesting conclusion out of this discussion could be:

It is difficult to string accurately without knowing the specs of the strings.
This discussion may be interesting for those who want to read more about that.

http://www.stringforum.net/board/showthread.php?t=3655

Ok....I'm done with this conversation.
Again Technatic, please don't view this as disrespectful but: the physics of a string is one thing, but never once have you mentioned any other factor that affects a string job.

I mentioned in an earlier post I have a pro shop owner buddy that told me "you can't listen to anything from the web". This is exactly what he's talking about. With this being the case, I agree with him, in instances like this.

What about the resistance caused by pulling at an angle. What about resistance from M's when pulling X's. What about drawback on clamp bases. Heck, if you're dialing it in this close, what about the temperature in the room, or where the string is stored, or how old the string, or the manufacturing consistency of the length of string you're pulling.

I'm not an engineer. I'm a contractor. I waste a lot of my valuable time trying to explain to an architect or engineer why their plans or drawings won't work in the "real world" application we're dealing with.
I am not disputing your graphs and calculations. I'm not really disputing anything you're saying.
I just think there's too much emphasis put on what you're saying and not enough on the variables that affect the final result.

There are so many other factors involved, and you don't mention any of them.
CONSISTANCY undermines all physics, IMPO. If a stringer is pulling, clamping and releasing at different rates, the physics change. I don't think it takes an engineer, or rocket scientist to agree with this.

Thanks for your input.
This topic will have to carry on with out me, and I'm sure it will, at the detriment to new, inexperienced stringers trying to "figure it out".
I'm out.

Irvin
10-10-2010, 11:17 AM
I have been stringing full poly on my drop weight at 52#s. Is it safe to assume that the tension is probably around 48? Or is the dropweight so accurate that it really is at 52? I have always wondered if there is a definitive answer to this.

Wow I can't believe you can get this much BS in one thread. No matter what string you use when the tension head is removed (sooner or later) you will start losing tension. Unless you are talking about something that will not fit in a tennis racket.

A drop weight is considered to be a constant pull tensioner. Let's assume it is also pulling the correct tension. That means the tension on the string (ignoring friction on the grommet or frame) is exactly what the tensioner is pulling.

As soon as you clamp the string and remove the tensioner the string will start recoiling and tension will go down from drawback. Most of that drawback will be removed when you pull tension on the next string. I say that because there is more friction in the 180 degree turn, don't forget about that. Then the string just starts stretching and you lose more tension. Then there is more drawback and tension loss in the other strings. Wow, I wonder how much tension is lost or gained when I tie off?

It is safe to assume if you string poly at 52 pounds and play with that racket later it won't even be close to 52 pounds. Why do you think some pros wants their racket strung while they are playing, and string their rackets so frequently?

Irvin

dgdawg
10-10-2010, 11:24 AM
Wow I can't believe you can get this much BS in one thread.
Irvin

.........Couldn't have said it better myself...........

Technatic
10-10-2010, 12:21 PM
Thanks dgdawg; one time you like these kinds of discussions and now you agree with someone who likes to say that it is all BS.

The nice things about forums is that you can discuss details of what happens. This thread deals with the accuracy of tensioners and I think that it is important to understand that the accuracy also depends on the type of string that you use.

This does not deny that there are all kind of other frictions in the string-system that causes loss of tension.
BUT those are not the item here, this story deals with tensioners.

Wow I can't believe you can get this much BS in one thread. No matter what string you use when the tension head is removed (sooner or later) you will start losing tension. Unless you are talking about something that will not fit in a tennis racket.


I do not like people who like to BS other mans good intentions. The "background question" is;
What do people really want to say when they call other mans ideas BS???

But You are absolutely right in your description of what happens.
The item is that there is a big difference in final loss of tension between a syn gut and a bad poly.
That is what I try to explain and that is what stringers need to know if they want to achieve a certain SBS in there stringjob with different types of string.

Irvin
10-10-2010, 01:08 PM
Thanks dgdawg; one time you like these kinds of discussions and now you agree with someone who likes to say that it is all BS...

The turth hurts doesn't it?

...This thread deals with the accuracy of tensioners and I think that it is important to understand that the accuracy also depends on the type of string that you use...

What difference does it make? Do you think the tensioner knows what kind of string you are using?

Irvin

JackB1
10-10-2010, 02:03 PM
PP....you wont know if your stringer is accurate unless you calibrate it. After that, it shouldn't change. I measured mine and I found out that it was stringing 3 lbs higher than the number on the arm said. Once I knew that, I just set the stringer 3 lbs less than my desired number. So if I wanted 55 lbs., I set it at 52. After I get done stringing, I take my racquet off and measure the tension with the racquet tune iphone app, and it's usually right on the money.

jim e
10-10-2010, 02:07 PM
What difference does it make? Do you think the tensioner knows what kind of string you are using?
Irvin

Actually my machine has a setting for string type on the LCD panel.
I never really use it and keep it on regular string setting, but it has settings for regular, poly, and kevlar strings. I'm sure that it has to do with string stretch against the tension head possibly. Like I said, I just keep it on regular string setting.

dgdawg
10-10-2010, 05:36 PM
Thanks dgdawg; one time you like these kinds of discussions and now you agree with someone who likes to say that it is all BS.

The nice things about forums is that you can discuss details of what happens. This thread deals with the accuracy of tensioners and I think that it is important to understand that the accuracy also depends on the type of string that you use.

This does not deny that there are all kind of other frictions in the string-system that causes loss of tension.
BUT those are not the item here, this story deals with tensioners.



I do not like people who like to BS other mans good intentions. The "background question" is;
What do people really want to say when they call other mans ideas BS???

But You are absolutely right in your description of what happens.
The item is that there is a big difference in final loss of tension between a syn gut and a bad poly.
That is what I try to explain and that is what stringers need to know if they want to achieve a certain SBS in there stringjob with different types of string.

Technatic-I was being facetious when I said I like posts like this. I also think everyone is entitled to one's own opinion.
I'm sorry for saying I agree with the "BS" statement, but I don't think it applies as much to the craft/art of stringing as other "things"
I am not refuting what you say or your calculations.
I am simply trying to say, all calculations aside: consistency reins
You have never acknowledged this. Even if you don't believe this, it is fact.

"It is difficult to string accurately without knowing the specs of the strings"

This is your comment and IMHO, open to interpretation.
I still maintain, you can run all the calculations you want, but without consistency on every pull, it means nothing. AND, with all the variables, all you have is consistency.
Science can't dictate what is right for a player. Only the player can.
Stringing for yourself is one thing, but stringing for 250+ players, that pay you to do so, is and entirely different story.
Most rec players don't care about the elongation coefficient, they just want there racquet to feel good.

I hope you get my point.

Technatic
10-11-2010, 04:28 AM
I am simply trying to say, all calculations aside: consistency reins
You have never acknowledged this. Even if you don't believe this, it is fact.


I agree that I did not agree about this in this thread, but I certainly did in the crank discussion:

think (hope) Technatic was meaning that consistency of SBS is important - this would suggest therefore that your consistency when stringing is also important - without consistent technique you won't get consistent SBS - I hope that's what he was getting at anyway!

In respect of the ERT - it's a great tool for measuring your consistency - I check each racquet as it comes off the machine and record it in my customer database. Then, when they come in next time I have a record of the tension and SBS - this allows me to try to match it if that's what they want or change it accordingly.

Cheers

Ash


I will maintain, until experts prove me incorrect, that consistency is the main factor in achieving consistent string jobs.



This was my answer to this:
Sorry for this misunderstanding.
No need to explain because Ash already said exaclty what I meant.

Sorry for this misunderstanding.
No need to explain because Ash already said exaclty what I meant.

dgdawg
10-11-2010, 04:35 AM
I agree that I did not agree about this in this thread, but I certainly did in the crank discussion:





This was my answer to this:
Sorry for this misunderstanding.
No need to explain because Ash already said exaclty what I meant.

.....very good.....