PDA

View Full Version : Different Versions of the Tour 90


RonP
06-03-2005, 04:44 PM
I have multiple Wilson ProStaff Tour 90 racquets (non-nCoded) and have just recently noticed that the paintjob on one of them is differnet from the other two (I bought them all separately). The throats of the two similar racquets have a large Wilson signature in silver on one side while the differing racquet has the words Double-Braid. The paintjob finish on the two similar racquets is dull compared to the differing one, which is rather glossy. Also, the two similar racquets have three letters on the buttcup of GFU and GGZ, while the differeing racquet is GFX? What does this mean? If it just different production time periods? Do the racquets differ in composition (It seems the two similar racquets feels somewhat hollow compared to the differing racquet; any advice on fixing?)? Answers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Michelangelo
06-03-2005, 11:32 PM
I'm not sure about the Pro Staff tour 90. However I have 5 nSix-One Tour 90, and 2 of them have "16 x 19" printed on one side of the throat right above the word "Tour".

MChong
06-03-2005, 11:44 PM
Yeah, it's probably a different run of them. It's like that with lots of racquets, actually. A good analogy would be like a different edition of the book; it's the exact same just a newer edition, lol.

JRW
06-04-2005, 08:25 AM
I have 4 PS Tour 90's with 3 different paint jobs. The racquet without the large silver "Wilson" on one side of the throat is the original paint job.

RonP
06-04-2005, 01:47 PM
So would the feeling of one racquet being lighter and hollower be due to specification tolerance levels being a bit extreme? I think I've read on this board that Wilson is pretty lousy at keeping tight specifications for racquets. I could be wrong. Thanks for everyone's reponses.

MChong
06-04-2005, 04:42 PM
Yeah, I'm hundred percent positive (Unless you got lucky) that the specs on those racquets won't be too similar because I highly doubt Wilson has good quality control and tolerance.

Michael82
06-04-2005, 05:11 PM
I bought two Tour 90s which came in a matched pair quite while ago. They are supposed to be under tighter tolerance. And they both have large silver Wilson printing on throats. Hope this helps.

Michelangelo
06-04-2005, 06:01 PM
Anyway, if you have multiple rackets in same model, you'd naturally expect customization of some of them for best spec match.

La Bomba
06-04-2005, 06:39 PM
That's like on the ROK it had the original paintjob with hyper carbon on side and the newer version with wilson on one side

RonP
06-04-2005, 08:20 PM
Michelangelo, what would be the best way to customize? How and what would I need to do so?

Michelangelo
06-04-2005, 11:14 PM
By meaning matching spec, usually we're referring to static weight and swing weight. If you're completely new about weight customization (normally you don't need to customize the grip for some rackets but other for the same model), just play around with your rackets, pick the one you like the weight (especially the swing weight) the most, take it to a tennis shop (not Big 5 type of department store) to ask the guy there to do the job for you. Usually they won't charge you if it's the store that you do your rackets regularly.

However, you hafta remember what is your goal, that is, to make your rackets with matching spec, or customize your rackets into something new.

Although many people have said that before, I briefly say it again here for your quick reference. Generally extra weight at
1. Throat or even on handle will give you more stability, but the center of mass of the racket may shift too low and thus affect the power, especially when serving;
2. At 3- and 9-o'clock positions of the head will give you more torsional stability (coz the largest distance between the weight, thus largest mass moment of inertia. This's the same thing as Wilson PWS, Yonex IPS and so forth, but manufacturers make it look better by integrating the weight into the racket frame);
3. At 12-o'clock of the head gives you more power (due to the conservation of momentum of the racket head and the ball) but affects the swing weight the most (due to the largest moment arm, the distance between the extra weight to your hand).

In real world, weight custom is not as simply as the above 3 points. Such as placing lead tape at 2- and 10-o'clock position at the head is actually the combination of point 2. and 3. and works somewhere between them.

PrestigeClassic
06-05-2005, 05:19 PM
yeah, at around Wimbledon time, the Tour 90 cosmetic was changed to include the large silver Wilson logo.

hummer23
06-05-2005, 07:12 PM
i had the older verison of teh tour 90, without the large wilson logo, and i lvoed it. it just said double braided in red on both sides if irecall. when that cracked, i got a wilson logo one from wilson, and ireally couldnt play with it. i found the old one to be much lighter and easier to swing for me, unlike the new one, i had no trouble with it. i doubt if that can be caused by just differneces in the same racquet, maybe the specs were actually changed between runs. like more weight or graphite added somewhere? or maybe its all in my head? i dont really know, as inever had a cahnce to hit with them on the same day and compare.

RonP
06-05-2005, 10:33 PM
hummer23: I actually find the one with the silver Wilson logo easier and lighter to swing, which also accounts for the hollow feeling I get and don't like. I'm guessing this is due to bad quality control and tolerance though.

PrestigeClassic: Do you know why Wilson changed the cosmetics?

Michelangelo: So if the easiest way to customize my racquet into matching specifications would be to ask a professional, how long would this usually take?

Michelangelo
06-06-2005, 06:27 AM
"Michelangelo: So if the easiest way to customize my racquet into matching specifications would be to ask a professional, how long would this usually take?"


First of all, for those who are unexperienced, asking the professional at tennis store would be the easiest way to get matching spec of your rackets. You can also D.I.Y. once you gain some experience. However, you'd better also buy a balance measure board if you wanna do your own job and make it scientifically (guesswork sometimes works pretty well for finding new interesting setting, but not for reaching matching spec among rackets). One more reason I'd suggest you to gonna a tennis store for the customization is they have electronic scale to measure the racket static weight as well, but compare with the balance measure board, usually the scale is expensive and not every DIYer will buy one. In addition, compared at most they charge US$1 or 2, how many times of DIY you need to have so that you can break the deal even? (Again as what I've said, usually they won't even charge you for the little weight customization if you have a store you do your rackets regularly. This is their trick to attract you to do more string jobs there and let them earn you more in long term.)

Anyway, normally weight customization for one racket only takes about 20-30 min. But in practice the store usually needs you leave the rackets for about 2 to 3 hours coz usually they're busy at other rackets (at least true for the one I usually go. At least 2 guys are constantly stringing rackets ANYTIME I go there). Also you'd better be prepared to go back and forth for several times in order to find the optimal weight for you (that's true. The more you know about your racket, the more you might complain and more you wanna correct/modify).

alan-n
06-06-2005, 06:38 AM
Also keep in mind, if you are THAT serious of having matching rackets, use the same strings and gauge on both racquets. Its not uncommon to have a 1-2 gram difference between the same racquets.... You won't notice this unless you pick up one racquet and then the other in succession.... Playing wise it won't make a bit a difference since you'll automatically adjust your timing anyways.

JRW
06-06-2005, 07:18 AM
The Tour 90's were made with tighter tolerances than the other Wilson frames at the time. Tour 90's were manufactured within +/- 3 grams of a desired weight wereas all other Wilson frames were made within +/- 6 grams of their published weight. The 4 Tour 90's that I have are all within 1 gram of each other.

PrestigeClassic
06-07-2005, 02:24 AM
hummer23: I actually find the one with the silver Wilson logo easier and lighter to swing, which also accounts for the hollow feeling I get and don't like. I'm guessing this is due to bad quality control and tolerance though.

PrestigeClassic: Do you know why Wilson changed the cosmetics?

Michelangelo: So if the easiest way to customize my racquet into matching specifications would be to ask a professional, how long would this usually take?

I'd imagine it has something to do with brand identity and making a racket look more like a bill board?

Rabbit
06-07-2005, 06:39 AM
I know that Wilson painted several left over T2000s to look like Tour 90s and put them on the market. I suspect this is what happened.