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Bench43
06-04-2005, 05:38 AM
Ok power vs. control.

Ill try to word this correctly.

I know that when a racquet is "powerful" the racquet itself gives you power with minimal input.

so the question is, when a racquet gives you "control" does that mean that it gives you control with minimal input... like does it actually do something for you to control the ball ITSELF? or does it allow you to control the ball?
and what about the racquet gives or allows you control. is it simply not having too much power that gives you control? or is it maneuverability that gives you control?

In other words, when i demo a racquet i know for sure how much power it has. thats easy to see. but about control, i dont know how to tell. or really i dont know what im looking for.


hope you guys catch my drift here.

thanks in advance.

Gaines Hillix
06-04-2005, 06:02 AM
Ok power vs. control.

Ill try to word this correctly.

I know that when a racquet is "powerful" the racquet itself gives you power with minimal input.

so the question is, when a racquet gives you "control" does that mean that it gives you control with minimal input... like does it actually do something for you to control the ball ITSELF? or does it allow you to control the ball?
and what about the racquet gives or allows you control. is it simply not having too much power that gives you control? or is it maneuverability that gives you control?

In other words, when i demo a racquet i know for sure how much power it has. thats easy to see. but about control, i dont know how to tell. or really i dont know what im looking for.


hope you guys catch my drift here.

thanks in advance.

Hello from a fellow Mariettan! A powerful racquet is usually larger, stiffer and lighter than a control racquet. Less ball energy is used up in bending the racquet and the longer strings and larger string bed will also deflect more, absorbing less energy from the ball. The player may also be able to swing the power racquet faster than a heavier control racquet. All of these factors combined makes a more powerful racquet. These are sometimes called game improvment racquets. Someone who has long, fast strokes may not be able to keep the ball inside the court with one of these frames. Someone with slow, short/compact strokes may need this kind of frame to help them generate power. A control frame or players racquet as they are often called usually has a smaller, more flexible head/frame and a denser string pattern(more strings in a smaller area). This kind of frame is for players that generate their own power with their hard, fast, loopy strokes. This allows this type of player to control their shots, not the other way around. Of course, there's the in between or "tweener" category for medium power. Hope that helps.

HeavyBall
06-04-2005, 07:25 AM
In addition to Gaines' comments,

I think people put too much stock in comparing "control" aspects between rackets with similar stats. Can you really say that the LM Prestige Mid has more/less control than the I.Prestige Mid? How about the 6.0 85 and PC600? Most people laud the 6.0 as the epitome of control, but the PC600 has a denser string pattern and more flex, both considered "control" attributes.

Power levels are somewhat more discernable. Control, however, particularily with statistically similar rackets, is mostly subjective. There are simply too many variations in the game of tennis.

Honestlybad
06-04-2005, 07:31 AM
It's easier to feel the ball with a thinner beam. Feel gives you control. And less power gives you more controll too.

Bench43
06-04-2005, 08:33 AM
Great! good answers.

so what i have gathered (correct me if i am wrong)
-a powerful racquet GIVES you power
-a control racquet ALLOWS you to control your shots.
-if you dont have good enough form to control the ball yourself, the racquet cant really help you, but its lack of power will help to not hurt you.

right?


BTW hello mariettan

Gaines Hillix
06-04-2005, 11:25 AM
There is no power in a racquet, per se. Here's how it works. Player A hits the ball and imparts a certain amount of energy to the ball. When it arrives on Player B's side of the court it still has that energy stored in it. When Player B hits it some of that energy is lost in bending the racquet and strings he is using and but he also adds energy from the force of the racquet he's hitting it with. If the racquet absorbs less of the energy and because it's light it allows Player B to swing it faster this will generate more force. The combination is more energy in the ball than there would be with a control racquet.

Rafa Nadal
06-04-2005, 11:30 AM
I have very very good power and good control with my Aeropro, i thnk you can so a lot with the right string. I like racquets which have power AND control but those are rar i think.

Grimjack
06-04-2005, 01:28 PM
Take a player with a certain kind of swing. He swings exactly the same every time. He's like a swinging robot.

When that player hits with a racquet that will transfer a lot of his swing energy into the motion of the ball, he is playing with a "powerful" racquet.

When he uses a racquet that takes that same exact swing and transfers comparatively little of his swing energy into the motion of the ball, he is playing with a "control" racquet.

That's the whole difference. "Power" and "control," in tennis racquet terms, are just opposite ends of the same scale.

Indiantwist
06-05-2005, 07:53 AM
If he transfers less energy isnt that inefficient?. Why would one not want all his energy to be in the ball?

Indiantwist
06-05-2005, 07:56 AM
On the same lines..iam yet to understand why More power means less control. Power wherever generated is SAME (isnt it?). SO if my racquet imparts more power or i impart more power...it is still power. So why are some racquets offering more control vs the others?.

I can see a marked difference between my current stick (wilson 8pts HH, 110 OS,9.4oz) and aero pro std (6 pts HL, 100 In, 11.3 Oz). The later gives more control to me for reasons i am yet to fully comprehend. The former gives me a great serve which iam yet to duplicate with the aero pro.

Gaines Hillix
06-05-2005, 07:57 AM
If he transfers less energy isnt that inefficient?. Why would one not want all his energy to be in the ball?

Because that might be too much energy for him to control and keep the ball on the court. In a game of in and out calls based on fractions of inches this can make a big difference.

TennsDog
06-05-2005, 09:03 AM
Flex has a lot to do with control. If the racket flexes a lot, then that energy is lost in the frame and not returned into the ball, thus less efficient. It allows you to more pecisely add power and placement as you want, partly because you need to work more at adding power and because the flexing allows the ball to remain in contact with the strings longer for more directional control. Control really does relate a lot to feel, but less power will generally give more control as well.