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View Full Version : Where should I position myself for this return?


jackzon
06-05-2005, 02:38 PM
I'm a 3.5.

Let's say I hit a good offensive shot deep to my opponent's (also a 3.5, so we're not worried about miracle shots here) backhand. I can see that he's barely going to get to the ball. He'll most likely hit a weak shot to the center of the court, but might get lucky and hit a lob deep. Also let's assume that I have enough time to get to any spot on the court by the time he gets to the ball.

So where should I be doing my split step? Thanks.

Honestlybad
06-05-2005, 02:45 PM
You should be doing the split steap as you enter the left service box. Basically get to the net about a foot or two from the left sideline depending on the quality of your shot and finish the point off with a volley, a drive volley or an overhead.

jackzon
06-05-2005, 02:51 PM
You should be doing the split step as you enter the left service box. Basically get to the net about a foot or two from the left sideline depending on the quality of your shot and finish the point off with a volley, a drive volley or an overhead.


Thanks for the quick reply. I'm not sure I understand exactly. Are you assuming that my opponent is a lefty? If so it makes sense. If not I think you've got me all the way on the other side of the court.

Kana Himezaki
06-05-2005, 03:04 PM
If you have any skill at the net, do what the advanced players do: move into the net on those. If you're a righty, hitting down the line is to your opponents backhand. Down the line is ideal for approaching. If it's going to be a weak reply, move up to the net.

If you know it's going to be a weak ball, move up on the same side of the court you hit it to. You should be splitstepping right before he hits the ball, which probably puts you around the service line. Put the ball away to the open court.

Honestlybad
06-05-2005, 03:16 PM
Thanks for the quick reply. I'm not sure I understand exactly. Are you assuming that my opponent is a lefty? If so it makes sense. If not I think you've got me all the way on the other side of the court.


Sorry silly mistake.

So you would be a foot or two from your right sideline. The further you force your opponent from the court the closer you can be to your sideline.

jackzon
06-05-2005, 03:33 PM
Thanks for both responses.

To refine it a little bit more....I have enough time to be anywhere. I could splitstep on my service line - 2 feet from the right sideline - or I could be 12 inches from the net - 2 feet from the right sideline. What's the optimal location?

Honestlybad
06-05-2005, 03:36 PM
You try to get to the net as fast as possible and splitstep at the moment or right after your opponent hits the ball. It should be instinctive. Just move in the direction of the ball.

Kana Himezaki
06-05-2005, 03:44 PM
Just what honestlybad said. You should splitstep right before or when your opponent makes contact, there is no certain ideal place. You just want to get as close to your ideal net position (wherever you're comfortable at) as possible.

BigbangerNYC
06-08-2005, 07:26 PM
You try to get to the net as fast as possible and splitstep at the moment or right after your opponent hits the ball. It should be instinctive. Just move in the direction of the ball.


I second that and for every shot.

Chris Evert-Awful
06-08-2005, 07:30 PM
What is "split-stepping"?

Kana Himezaki
06-08-2005, 07:39 PM
A splitstep is usually a short hop that many people do right before the opponent makes contact with the ball.

It's not really literally a hop, but the player's feet barely leave the ground. He adjusts to where the ball is going after struck, and moves toward the ball immediately after landing down.

A split-step is useful because it allows you to react to the ball easily and change directions immediately accordingly. If you're moving one way and try to change directions when you realize it's coming the other way, expect to lose time. The split step allows you to change directions, and actually lets you move a little faster because once you're leaning slightly to the ball in midair, you gain immediate momentum to the side.

It's pretty much for reacting to the ball and changing directions.

Rickson
06-08-2005, 08:46 PM
I'd wait a few feet in front of your deuce side serve box, assuming he's a righty that is, closer to the T than the sideline. If your approach was truly deep, he'll have trouble passing you, and you can cover a lot of the court because you'd be deep enough not to get lobbed yet close enough to run forward and hit a good volley if he hits it short. If your approach to his backhand lands inside the service box, he has a very good chance of passing you.