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Meat
06-13-2005, 04:28 PM
I realize it's probably a beginner question. I play at a 4.5 level right now, and am called advanced simply for the things I do on the court.

But I don't know much about the actual game, I just play and do whatever seems right at the moment.

Is it possible to add sidespin on shots other than slices? Not serves, that's obvious. But can you effectively (and consistently) place sidespin on balls without slicing?

I can do the slices. But I want even more variety, more things in my arsenal. So I'm asking here.

Thanks.

Marius_Hancu
06-13-2005, 04:30 PM
on DTL topspin shots, to make sure you bring them in the court.

Meat
06-13-2005, 04:31 PM
Would that be only in the reverse forehand?

Thank you for the response, I'll test it out. :D

Marius_Hancu
06-13-2005, 04:34 PM
Would that be only in the reverse forehand?



Definitely not.

On any FH, provides better control on DTL.

Graf was using this on her DTL topspin backhand.

Thanatos
06-13-2005, 05:45 PM
[QUOTE=Meat]I realize it's probably a beginner question. I play at a 4.5 level right now, and am called advanced simply for the things I do on the court.

But I don't know much about the actual game, I just play and do whatever seems right at the moment.

QUOTE]

Just curious you are at the 4.5 level and you don't know much about the game. Is this a USTA 4.5? All the 4.5 I know are very congnizant of the strategies involved and stroke fundamentals.

Meat
06-13-2005, 05:59 PM
I play at a 4.5 tournament level. I don't know everything involved with stroke fundamentals and strategies, mostly because I'm almost completely self-taught.

If you want information on my game and how I play, look in the "Destroying the opponent" thread and the "I'm having the best time of my LIFE" thread.

It's not self-rated, it's the USTA ranking. I usually get by by employing changes in timing, variations on spin, and using different amounts of sidespin both ways (on slices) to force people into jamming or losing control.

Thanatos
06-13-2005, 06:11 PM
I play at a 4.5 tournament level. I don't know everything involved with stroke fundamentals and strategies, mostly because I'm almost completely self-taught.

If you want information on my game and how I play, look in the "Destroying the opponent" thread and the "I'm having the best time of my LIFE" thread.

It's not self-rated, it's the USTA ranking. I usually get by by employing changes in timing, variations on spin, and using different amounts of sidespin both ways (on slices) to force people into jamming or losing control.

I'm impressed. You are like the some guys I play sometimes in the USTA league. A wolf in sheep clothing.

papa
06-13-2005, 06:19 PM
Not trying to be a wise a__ but I don't even know a guy at the 4 - 4.5 level that gets fooled by the things mentioned. One of the primary factors in this is that good players are not going to give you the types of shots where one can play these games.

Meat
06-13-2005, 06:32 PM
I've played these types of games, and continue to do so.

People use changes in timing at every level. By keeping a steady level of one shot, then suddenly adding on a little spin, the opponent loses the adjustment.

Also, it is hard for anybody to return a deep slice that comes in and bounces directly in their side.

It's acceptable to produce moderate, unattackable pace shots that gradually force people into errors right? Or sending a stream of sidespin slices down the side to draw people off the court more, then ending it with a dropshot? The drop shot is disguised as the exact same starting motion, and you simply angle it to the other side.

It's also acceptable to take the ball "out of the opponent's contact zone", as advice everywhere states. I just take that to another level.

TennsDog
06-13-2005, 08:18 PM
I once hit a great sidespin forehand approach shot that went from my center of the court to his center of the court. It was really nasty-looking, but very effective. I hit it short so he had to run up to it, and it was to his forehand, but the sidespin took it almost all the way to his backhand and his racket became useless. He just watched it hit him and trickle on by. It is not easy to hit a shot like that with a lot of pace, spin, or consistancy, but if it goes in it's great.

takeuchi
06-13-2005, 09:18 PM
whenever i get a ball neck high or higher, i wipe it and the sidespin sometimes gives it a funky curve in the air. if i do a reverse forehand it goes the other way sometimes.

TwistServe
06-13-2005, 09:25 PM
Would that be only in the reverse forehand?

Thank you for the response, I'll test it out. :D

It's called hittin on the outside of the ball.. You still have topspin but you create a curve that brings the ball back into the court. Same with the backhand DTL.. You also do this for Inside-Out forehands and basically any groundstroke.

Watch the pros or any advanced players groundstroke ball flight path. Hit with a forehand it'll curve from left to right to left. If you go DTL it'll look as though the ball is going out but curves back in.

Real easy to do goin crosscourt or short angles as well.

glass
06-14-2005, 01:11 AM
Yes. Try hitting a continental forehand.

papa
06-14-2005, 05:02 AM
Meat, any shot in tennis that comes off a racquet without touching anything else (like a hand, clothing, etc) is a "fair" shot as long as it lands within the opponents court. You can spin or do anything else you want to the ball.

My point is that its unrealistic to think a "higher level" player is just going to give you sitters to work with - and most pushers like a slow paced game. In any event, if it works for you, and it sounds like it has so far, stay with it.

TwistServe
06-15-2005, 09:37 PM
From Post #2: on DTL topspin shots, to make sure you bring them in the court.

From Post #3: Would that be only in the reverse forehand?

From Post #4: Definitely not.

On any FH, provides better control on DTL.

Graf was using this on her DTL topspin backhand.

Wow Meat.. You're Mr. Reverse forehand.. too bad even Marius disagrees with you and he's talking about the same stroke I've been talking about. Take the ball on the outside while directing it to the ad court.. you get this crazy thing called "side spin".. I would think a spin master destroyer of opponents would know this.. You should make a poll to see who actually uses the term "reverse forehand" in modern tennis.

RiosTheGenius
06-15-2005, 10:13 PM
I said this before and I doubt that I'm alone here....
MEAT IS AN EGOCENTRIC FREAK, he's pretty good at posting bad threads though.

Meat
06-15-2005, 10:22 PM
TwistServe, you have once again carried a topic over from another thread onto another one.

Yes, many people DO use the term reverse forehand. I simply asked whether this right to left sidespin was possible in reverse forehands. Marius said it was obtainable in all forehands, which is fine. You can brush up either side of the ball, what you're thinking is when the ball goes left into the court when you brush around the right side.

It's obtainable also if you brush over the OTHER side, in which the other person was talking about in the inside out forehands.

Rios, thank you. I AM egocentric. Bad threads? Everyone asks questions. Would you rather I post a thread titled "hlp me plz mi balls rnt goin over" or "WNT MRE TOPSPINPLZ, HALP"?

Get over it.

Just try succeeding with my style. Play with a malnourished body, of a guy that was completely dehydrated and starved with permanent damage on growth and muscles. Then go to 4.5/5.0 people and actually beat them with it.

TwistServe
06-15-2005, 10:54 PM
Definitely not.

On any FH, provides better control on DTL.

Graf was using this on her DTL topspin backhand.

What a revolution!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

This is called an DTL forehand and Meat doesn't think it's possible to hit to cause it to hook back into the court! HHAHAHA Work on this stroke bud.. You'll make 5.0 some day.

Meat
06-15-2005, 11:04 PM
An "off" forehand is not meant for hooking back into the court. It is on inside out forehands and it meant to be used offensively.

Keep asking "big time experts", maybe you'll be able to parrot enough to seem like you know what you're talking about someday.

TwistServe
06-15-2005, 11:20 PM
I'll leave this thread for some other "expert" to respond as you're starting to hurt my feelings too much. I just can't continuing playing technical termonology games anymore...

I'll keep it simple for some folks:

When a right hander slices a serve.. they hit the ball from left to right and thus the ball curves from left to right to left..

The forehand when hit from the ad or deuce court, going to the ad court, can achieve the same spin where the ball goes from left, to right to left.. To do this you hit on the outside of the ball and around. It will hooking into the court. This is not a reverse forehand as the reverse forehand has right to left spin.

Meat
06-15-2005, 11:22 PM
Another response you're posting everywhere.

Unfortunately, I'll point out AGAIN that it's wrong.

Reverse forehands are left to right, and hook in on the deuce court.

And when you're hitting from the ad to ad court, which is WHAT AN INSIDE OUT "OFF" FOREHAND IS, you're NOT hooking in! Don't you get it? By definition, an inside-out forehand is aimed crosscourt! It never hooks!

Sorry to tell you again, but you're wrong.

TwistServe
06-15-2005, 11:37 PM
Another response you're posting everywhere.

Unfortunately, I'll point out AGAIN that it's wrong.

Reverse forehands are left to right, and hook in on the deuce court.

And when you're hitting from the ad to ad court, which is WHAT AN INSIDE OUT "OFF" FOREHAND IS, you're NOT hooking in! Don't you get it? By definition, an inside-out forehand is aimed crosscourt! It never hooks!

Sorry to tell you again, but you're wrong.

Wow I think something went wrong with you in India back then.. Of course the forehand doesn't hook in. My whole claim was that the forehand curves from left to right to left. When you hit it down the line it'll hook in.. Oh wait if you dont get near the lines obviously it doesn't hook in.. ah ya you got me.. lol..

DTL Forehand brushing on the outside of the ball.. ball goes left to right to left.. if its close to the lines it'll hook in.. if its not close to the line, theres still a curve.

Insideout forehand brushing on the outside of the ball.. ball goes left to right to left... if it hooks in it would have to do a 180.. if that's what you thought i meant then you cant read with proper assumptions

TwistServe
06-15-2005, 11:42 PM
on DTL topspin shots, to make sure you bring them in the court.

Please clarify what you mean Marius? Will the ball's flight path go from left to right to left?

Again, is this called the revere forehand.. no right? Or am I wrong?

As for everyone else, please don't clutter this thread so as to ensure Marius can view this response and his opinion can be heard.

Thank you.

As for me.. I beleive this stroke is used because it is extremely safe.. YOu aim for the DTL but because of the curve of the ball even if you're late it'll curve back in.. I dont see why meat doesn't undertand this stroke and keeps refering to this as a reverse forehand.