PDA

View Full Version : Dreamy Emotions


Vermillion
02-01-2011, 08:10 PM
What are the differences between emotions felt in a dream compared to the ones felt in "reality"? Or are there no such differences after all?

Sentinel
02-01-2011, 08:16 PM
I've felt emotions for people in dreams I would not have felt in real life. I don't know why that is so. Are those feelings real or imaginary ?

SoBad
02-01-2011, 08:21 PM
I had a dream last night. I was arranging tall slim stem white wine glasses on a table of black marble. The table surface was cold. The glasses felt sturdy yet fragile.

Vermillion
02-01-2011, 08:26 PM
@Sent, What kind of emotions are you referring to?

@SB-San, Temperatures do not qualify as emotions, in my opinion.

SoBad
02-01-2011, 08:34 PM
@Sent, What kind of emotions are you referring to?

@SB-San, Temperatures do not qualify as emotions, in my opinion.

The dreams are just a reflection of the residual thought inside the mind before falling asleep. Thus, a reflection of reality. Unless of course the memory of the dream is in fact recollection of reality. Just a thought.

Vermillion
02-01-2011, 08:41 PM
And what if the dreams have no correlation at all with the residual thoughts or indeed, possess no relationship with the memories of "reality"?

SoBad
02-01-2011, 08:48 PM
And what if the dreams have no correlation at all with the residual thoughts or indeed, possess no relationship with the memories of "reality"?

I would challenge the veracity of the individual’s recollection of the residual thoughts or indeed their cognizance of reality before questioning the link between those and their dreams.

Vermillion
02-01-2011, 08:51 PM
Truth can always be challenged, but what I am most interested in are the emotions felt inside the dream compared to those felt in reality. Are they the same after all? As for the awareness of reality, how would you describe your "definition" of the term in order for an outsider to understand just as you do?

SoBad
02-01-2011, 08:59 PM
Emotions from the dream are truer than the awake emotions. That is the precise reason why the dreams can lead to a better understanding (“awareness”) of “reality”. Yes, that’s what I think.

Vermillion
02-01-2011, 09:00 PM
How are they truer if the experiences in the different realms are unrelated? And how can dreams lead to a better understanding of reality?

SoBad
02-01-2011, 09:12 PM
How are they truer if the experiences in the different realms are unrelated?

The dreams reveal the deepest – there is nothing in the “reality” that is unrelated.

And how can dreams lead to a better understanding of reality?

Because the repressed comes out in the dream. As a simple example, say you meet someone and not sure what to think of them. You decide to sleep on it and she comes after you with a golf club in the dream. You then wake up with the knowledge that the person in question is not good for you, although not necessarily the violent dangerous psychopath that came through in the dream.

Vermillion
02-01-2011, 09:40 PM
But dreams are just dreams as most would say. How can one justify that emotions experienced in dreams are truer than the awakened ones? Also, what makes you say that the repressed emerges within the dream? Your example is mostly relying on just intuition/impulse rather than palpable interactions though.

Mike Bulgakov
02-01-2011, 09:52 PM
The dreams are just a reflection of the residual thought inside the mind before falling asleep.
My understanding is that this is the prevailing opinion of psychiatrists who study the dreaming mind. Nevertheless, it is sometimes difficult to correlate a dream to recent experiences, or matters that the mind needs to process.

I recently dreamed I was depositing a large amount of money in a Moscow bank, and Elena Dementieva (who looked to be in her forties) was my banker. She accused me of money laundering, and I told her that is no way to treat a customer. I added, "This bank is a ****ing joke," and started to leave.

Elena hit an alarm button and these thugs ran for me. I ran out of the bank and the thugs started shooting at me. I woke up at this point.

This dream has no correlation to anything I can think of. It is hard to decipher why my mind came up with this in my sleep.

SoBad
02-01-2011, 09:57 PM
But dreams are just dreams as most would say. How can one justify that emotions experienced in dreams are truer than the awakened ones? Also, what makes you say that the repressed emerges within the dream? Your example is mostly relying on just intuition/impulse rather than palpable interactions though.

You can always challenge the implications of the dreams while in “awakened” state, but not the other way around. One can summon their logic nearly at will, but not their intuition or impulse. Dreams are the unique channel for that type of information. I look forward to offlining shortly into a sweet world of dreams.

Bertie B
02-01-2011, 10:07 PM
I like what SoBad is saying.

Mike Bulgakov
02-01-2011, 10:16 PM
You can always challenge the implications of the dreams while in “awakened” state, but not the other way around.
Sometimes the mind is aware that it is dreaming. I use to have a common dream, most often after a long flight, where I became aware that I was dreaming. It was almost always a dream where I saw a distant city or past era, and I would observe people engaged in daily activities.

It would be like watching a film from a distant time or city, and I would wonder how my mind was conjuring the images. I was especially fascinated by all the faces passing by.

SoBad
02-01-2011, 10:19 PM
My understanding is that this is the prevailing opinion of psychiatrists who study the dreaming mind. Nevertheless, it is sometimes difficult to correlate a dream to recent experiences, or matters that the mind needs to process.

I recently dreamed I was depositing a large amount of money in a Moscow bank, and Elena Dementieva (who looked to be in her forties) was my banker. She accused me of money laundering, and I told her that is no way to treat a customer. I added, "This bank is a ****ing joke," and started to leave.

Elena hit an alarm button and these thugs ran for me. I ran out of the bank and the thugs started shooting at me. I woke up at this point.

This dream has no correlation to anything I can think of. It is hard to decipher why my mind came up with this in my sleep.

I will be filing a motion in the pro dreams thread based on your statement here. This is a courtesy notice and Likhovtseva’s team is getting a copy, yes.

I like what SoBad is saying.

Thanks, verm is a very competent interviewer too.

adams_1
02-01-2011, 10:26 PM
Dream-cocaine is pretty great stuff.

ProgressoR
02-01-2011, 10:48 PM
Sometimes dreams have no other stimulus than just being chattering of the mind.

Additionally, the state in which we are experiencing this thread could also be a dream, a dream within a dream etc, one day we may even wake up from it.

hollywood9826
02-02-2011, 06:58 AM
My Friend Mike had a dream once that our trailer park was getting invaded by King Kong. but when Kong got closer i was sitting up on his shoulder.

What does that mean?

I also had a dream once where I was making love to a Gargoyle. This Gargoyle had a nice rack and was probably the hottest Gargoyle of all times. It was not just a gargoyle staute as she was on top. It pretty much the 2nd or 3rd greatest dream of my life so far.

What does the Gargoyle dream mean?

Sentinel
02-02-2011, 07:13 AM
@Sent, What kind of emotions are you referring to?


A close relative of mine died in a dream. I had tears or cried. Now i know that would never happen in real life (the person is alive, i am just assuming it won't happen). I was puzzled when i awoke.

mikeler
02-02-2011, 09:58 AM
I hate the dream where I'm back in college and just come to the realization that I have a final tomorrow for a class that I never attended and forgot about.

Kobble
02-02-2011, 11:10 AM
I hate the dream where I'm back in college and just come to the realization that I have a final tomorrow for a class that I never attended and forgot about.That dream sucks. I sit and wonder, did I really take that class I need to graduate. Then I wake up, and I'm like, man, already graduated. Thank goodness.

On a side note, I beginning to like the snakes and alligator dreams. My dreams are adventures. Like going out to a remote location where some shady business is going on deep in the forest. If they see you, you will be shot at.

Vermillion
02-02-2011, 12:14 PM
A close relative of mine died in a dream. I had tears or cried. Now i know that would never happen in real life (the person is alive, i am just assuming it won't happen). I was puzzled when i awoke.

To me, that would be a "normal" reaction if one were to witness such events. That brings back the original question of whether dreamotions are the same as emotions experienced in reality. The sadness you felt in the dream...did that feel similar to a sadness you have experienced in the past? In my own experiences, the emotions I have felt in my dreams as they occur are exactly the same kind of emotions/feelings I have felt in reality whether those emotions consist of joy, sadness, excitement, etc. Is it not all based on one's perception? If mere fantasy lets you experience the same emotions as reality, how are those emotions any different from each other?

ollinger
02-02-2011, 12:48 PM
"mere fantasy" and dreams are not synonymous. Fantasy is a conscious waking process, and the content of dreams is usually not what a person typically fantasizes about. If they were, I'd wake up screaming that I was being suffocated by an enormous breast every morning. What's useful to note is that deep electrode studies have shown that the same areas of the brain's limbic system (one of the primary "emotion" areas) that are active during waking emotional arousal are also active during intense dreams. So at SOME level emotions in dreams are like waking emotions. What's different is that higher areas of the brain, cortical processing areas for emotion, are less active during dreams. So the answer is yes-but-not-entirely as to dream emotions being similar to waking emotions.

ollinger
02-02-2011, 12:52 PM
(note: a very common side effect of most antidepressants is that dreams and their emotional content seem more vivid and real, so much so that some patients are really disturbed by them. I've had to take a number of patients off those meds because this problem was so disturbing)

sureshs
02-02-2011, 12:56 PM
The limbic system is part of our reptilian past. It does not understand morality and conscience, only raw emotions. It is the "Id" in Freudian terms.

Vermillion
02-02-2011, 04:49 PM
Ah, forgive my unrestricted sense of definitive terms. You are correct in the fact that fantasy is a conscious act; I was referring to the unreal realm itself. I am curious though as to how the antidepressants exactly are affecting the body in order for the patients to experience the effects that you have mentioned.

Also, if the cortical processing areas for emotions are less active whilst dreaming, would it be under the assumption that the brain is trying to prevent you from confusing the emotions felt in a dream versus the ones in reality?

flyinghippos101
02-02-2011, 05:22 PM
The most frustrating and puzzling dreams to me are those where I express feelings of intimacy towards people I wouldn't in real life. Recurring dreams with the above situation only makes it even more frustrating.

SoBad
02-02-2011, 05:45 PM
The most frustrating and puzzling dreams to me are those where I express feelings of intimacy towards people I wouldn't in real life. Recurring dreams with the above situation only makes it even more frustrating.

Two questions - you wouldn't express the feelings because you would not want to or would not dare?

And secondly, how do you recognize a dream as recurring? I ask because a human brain is typically capable of creating a recollection of a history of multiple/recurring dreams over a single night's sleep. The only way to know that a dream is recurring is to have a record of some sort of earlier occurrences, such as making a written note in a diary or telling someone about it.

ollinger
02-02-2011, 05:46 PM
How do antidepressants make dreams more vivid. Might be an accident related to the fact that the alertness center of the brain, the reticular activating system in the brainstem, consists mainly of serotonergic neurons, which may be stimulated by antidepressants as an incidental effect of their main activity higher up in the brain. As for the cortex being less active during sleep, I suspect this has less to do with avoiding confusion between sleep and wakefulness, and more to do with what the nature/purpose of sleep is in the first place. Some of that seems to be restorative ("rest") and some of it consolidating, by enzyme synthesis, what was learned that day. A period of quiescence seems to facilitate these processes. Also, we know dreams tend to mostly fade from our awareness rather quickly shortly after awakening (if we remember them at all) so there's little risk of confusing dream content with life content for most of us. Finally, is it important for us to be aware of our dreams at all? Probably not, since research shows that everyone dreams (awaken anyone during REM sleep in a sleep lab and he will report dreaming), yet the proportion of people who say they don't recall dreaming at all when they awaken normally is so high that it can't be important to remember them. No particular psychological trait reliably identifies those who don't recall dreaming.

flyinghippos101
02-02-2011, 05:53 PM
Two questions - you wouldn't express the feelings because you would not want to or would not dare?

And secondly, how do you recognize a dream as recurring? I ask because a human brain is typically capable of creating a recollection of a history of multiple/recurring dreams over a single night's sleep. The only way to know that a dream is recurring is to have a record of some sort of earlier occurrences, such as making a written note in a diary or telling someone about it.

These are feelings I wouldn't wish to express towards this person nor do I feel them in reality, at least I don't think I do. These dreams are indicative of a recurring theme since they feature the same person, same emotions, feelings and I wake up utterly perplexed.

LameTennisPlayer
02-02-2011, 05:55 PM
I've felt emotions for people in dreams I would not have felt in real life. I don't know why that is so. Are those feelings real or imaginary ?

ive had dreams like that too.... i think emotions in dreams are more intense than real life emotions...

flyinghippos101
02-02-2011, 05:58 PM
ive had dreams like that too.... i think emotions in dreams are more intense than real life emotions...

Yes, dreams are so perplexing and interesting at the same time. The fact that it explores our subconscious and unconscious minds only adds another dimension to the puzzle

SoBad
02-02-2011, 06:04 PM
These are feelings I wouldn't wish to express towards this person nor do I feel them in reality, at least I don't think I do. These dreams are indicative of a recurring theme since they feature the same person, same emotions, feelings and I wake up utterly perplexed.

I understand your answer to my first question – perhaps you are masking some feelings from yourself in your conscious state, which doesn’t sound unusual. As for the second question, I was wondering how you can be sure that a particular dream is recurring unless you have prior record (in writing or communicated to someone) of the dream from a prior occurrence.

dlk
02-02-2011, 06:10 PM
How do antidepressants make dreams more vivid. Might be an accident related to the fact that the alertness center of the brain, the reticular activating system in the brainstem, consists mainly of serotonergic neurons, which may be stimulated by antidepressants as an incidental effect of their main activity higher up in the brain. As for the cortex being less active during sleep, I suspect this has less to do with avoiding confusion between sleep and wakefulness, and more to do with what the nature/purpose of sleep is in the first place. Some of that seems to be restorative ("rest") and some of it consolidating, by enzyme synthesis, what was learned that day. A period of quiescence seems to facilitate these processes. Also, we know dreams tend to mostly fade from our awareness rather quickly shortly after awakening (if we remember them at all) so there's little risk of confusing dream content with life content for most of us. Finally, is it important for us to be aware of our dreams at all? Probably not, since research shows that everyone dreams (awaken anyone during REM sleep in a sleep lab and he will report dreaming), yet the proportion of people who say they don't recall dreaming at all when they awaken normally is so high that it can't be important to remember them. No particular psychological trait reliably identifies those who don't recall dreaming.

Wow, now this is a sound post; neurology or psychiatry good:shock:

flyinghippos101
02-02-2011, 06:37 PM
I understand your answer to my first question – perhaps you are masking some feelings from yourself in your conscious state, which doesn’t sound unusual. As for the second question, I was wondering how you can be sure that a particular dream is recurring unless you have prior record (in writing or communicated to someone) of the dream from a prior occurrence.

Tbh, I didn't really record or communicate my dreams to anyone but it's just that these dreams have the same sort "atmosphere"(as transparent and vague as that sounds) It's a type of feeling that I feel can immediately differentiate itself from any other dream I have. I can't really explain it. And while that may not exactly be technically evidence of a recurring dreams, I feel so sure that I'm experiencing a common theme in my dreams.

Sorry if I'm not giving you enough to work it.

SoBad
02-02-2011, 06:48 PM
Tbh, I didn't really record or communicate my dreams to anyone but it's just that these dreams have the same sort "atmosphere"(as transparent and vague as that sounds) It's a type of feeling that I feel can immediately differentiate itself from any other dream I have. I can't really explain it. And while that may not exactly be technically evidence of a recurring dreams, I feel so sure that I'm experiencing a common theme in my dreams.

Sorry if I'm not giving you enough to work it.

Not at all, I appreciate your frank reply. It may very well be the case that you have had the same dream recurring for weeks months or years. However, I also know that it is not uncommon for people to experience a single night’s dream that creates a memory of recurring dreams. In those cases it is impossible to tell whether or not the memory is true or generated from the single recent dream, unless the subject took notes or told someone about the previous instances. If you are curious about this, you may wish to make written notes about your dreams going forward. That’s the only way you can establish dream patterns with any certainty.

flyinghippos101
02-02-2011, 07:18 PM
Not at all, I appreciate your frank reply. It may very well be the case that you have had the same dream recurring for weeks months or years. However, I also know that it is not uncommon for people to experience a single night’s dream that creates a memory of recurring dreams. In those cases it is impossible to tell whether or not the memory is true or generated from the single recent dream, unless the subject took notes or told someone about the previous instances. If you are curious about this, you may wish to make written notes about your dreams going forward. That’s the only way you can establish dream patterns with any certainty.

I may end up doing just that, thanks for the info. But in regards to the OP's topic on discrepancies between real life and dream emotions, lets say there was a confirmed case of recurring dreams, all conveying emotions and feelings that would otherwise contradict our real life mindset (specifically pertaining to intimacy and relationships) What message is our mind attempting to convey to our consciousness with these reoccurring themes in our dreams?

SoBad
02-02-2011, 08:05 PM
I may end up doing just that, thanks for the info. But in regards to the OP's topic on discrepancies between real life and dream emotions, lets say there was a confirmed case of recurring dreams, all conveying emotions and feelings that would otherwise contradict our real life mindset (specifically pertaining to intimacy and relationships) What message is our mind attempting to convey to our consciousness with these reoccurring themes in our dreams?

Yes, I wonder – perhaps the subconscious mind in the dream state reveals inner urges and primal instincts that are suppressed in the conscious state? In a modern civilised society an individual’s upbringing and education plays an important role in the functioning of their conscious mind by channeling the natural tendencies (sex and violence) in ways that the society finds agreeable. Perhaps the variance between the dream and the conscious state is a measure of the impact that the environment imposes on the individual.

heycal
02-03-2011, 09:57 PM
I like what SoBad is saying.

Why did you send me that rather odd email, Bertie B? As best I can recollect, we've had no dealings with each other, and am I'm not familiar with your posts here at TT.

Mike Bulgakov
02-03-2011, 10:27 PM
I hate the dream where I'm back in college and just come to the realization that I have a final tomorrow for a class that I never attended and forgot about.

I have had this dream several times, and I have friends who have had the same dream. I wonder why it is such a common dream.

Regarding emotions in dreams, I recently dreamed that I could not find my car after shopping at a Trader Joe's. Just as I became convinced that my car was stolen, I could hear a cat calling in distress.

I ran to the calls, and found my car behind a giant SUV. The cat distress calls were wailing "why?" I had parked my car on a cat's tail. The cat just looked at me in a perplexed manner, as if it was wondering why I did this. I felt terrible, told the cat it was an accident, and pushed my car back and off its tail.

I put the cat in my car and drove it home to give it something to eat. I then realized it probably belonged to someone and woke up. I felt very much at unease when I woke up.