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View Full Version : Got Extra Item By Mistake, Would You Return?


FedererExpress
02-14-2011, 05:22 PM
Ordered something online. I have ordered from them multiple times from this store, great company with great customer service. This time they sent me an extra item (Worth 80$) on accident. It's not something random, and I could definitely put it to good use. Would you guys return it? Or just keep and credit your random good luck?

Thanks!

dlk
02-14-2011, 05:25 PM
Ordered something online. I have ordered from them multiple times from this store, great company with great customer service. This time they sent me an extra item (Worth 80$) on accident. It's not something random, and I could definitely put it to good use. Would you guys return it? Or just keep and credit your random good luck?

Thanks!

We'll, don't leave us hanging. What exactly was it. It matters! IT'S GOTTA HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH YOUR SCREENAME.

FedererExpress
02-14-2011, 05:30 PM
Sorry I don't want to mention store just in case. (I know I'm paranoid)

dlk
02-14-2011, 05:35 PM
If it's a pair of 3.3s, I'm gonna assume they sent them on purpose. If it's some device to prevent glabal warming, I'd return it.

GetBetterer
02-14-2011, 06:02 PM
I would keep it but then I would confess my sins to the company.

Fee
02-14-2011, 06:24 PM
Ordered something online. I have ordered from them multiple times from this store, great company with great customer service. This time they sent me an extra item (Worth 80$) on accident. It's not something random, and I could definitely put it to good use. Would you guys return it? Or just keep and credit your random good luck?

Thanks!

How would you feel if someone stole $80 from you? Please don't say 'its a big corporation, they can afford it'. Call the company and tell them what happened, they will probably send you a return package so you can ship it back to them free of charge since it was their mistake. If the company is that great, they might give you a gift card for your trouble.

That's my opinion, but I believe in karma so take it as you will.

billsgwn
02-14-2011, 06:36 PM
How would you feel if someone stole $80 from you? Please don't say 'its a big corporation, they can afford it'. Call the company and tell them what happened, they will probably send you a return package so you can ship it back to them free of charge since it was their mistake. If the company is that great, they might give you a gift card for your trouble.

That's my opinion, but I believe in karma so take it as you will.


Agreed. If you like the company, theres no reason to try and take advantage of an honest mistake

r2473
02-14-2011, 06:43 PM
I'd keep it. In fact, this has happened to me before and that is what I did.

A buddy of mine got 2 extra PGA golf books this year (they cost ~$70 and are filled with free rounds and great deals at many courses in the area). He bought 2 in person and he received 2 in the mail a week or so later. He gave me one.

maleyoyo
02-14-2011, 07:04 PM
Someone in the shipping department who probably makes $10 an hour and made an honest mistake could be in trouble with the boss.

flyinghippos101
02-14-2011, 07:08 PM
Was it a western grip?

dlesser13
02-14-2011, 07:35 PM
Can you top my free 800 dollar laptop that HP sent me by mistake?

SoBad
02-14-2011, 07:43 PM
Ordered something online. I have ordered from them multiple times from this store, great company with great customer service. This time they sent me an extra item (Worth 80$) on accident. It's not something random, and I could definitely put it to good use. Would you guys return it? Or just keep and credit your random good luck?

Thanks!

Tough call, but considering that it’s a relatively misc (small/cheap) item, I’d keep it. You say it’s “worth $80”, but it’s probably worth a lot less to the retailer, depending on the mark-up. The cost of the return (shipping, handling, everybody’s time and effort) is likely more to the society as a whole than the worth of the item to the retailer. The punitive element of your action (or lack thereof rather, in this case) is appropriate, considering that the retailer is at fault. Of course, if the retailer contacts you regarding the extra item, I would suggest being honest and cooperating with the return process.

mctennis
02-14-2011, 07:51 PM
I can't believe people would actually reply " I'd keep it" as their answer. Where are people's honesty, morals and character? If they didn't get a pair of shoes ( in this instance) I'm sure they'd be the first one to cry and b1tch. Then post about how that company cheated them out of $80 and for no one to buy anything from them. I'm not saying you will not return them FedererExpress I'm just saying people that actually voted to keep the product.
It's not random good luck. Not like finding two four leaf clovers. It's an honest mistake so send it back after you call and tell them what happened. They may just pay for return shipping. If not pay for return shipping yourself. Show some character and honesty.
Some people make me ill with how dishonest and immoral they are or have become.

SFrazeur
02-14-2011, 07:58 PM
I can't believe people would actually reply " I'd keep it" as their answer. Where are people's honesty, morals and character? If they didn't get a pair of shoes ( in this instance) I'm sure they'd be the first one to cry and b1tch. Then post about how that company cheated them out of $80 and for no one to buy anything from them. I'm not saying you will not return them FedererExpress I'm just saying people that actually voted to keep the product.
It's not random good luck. Not like finding two four leaf clovers. It's an honest mistake so send it back after you call and tell them what happened. They may just pay for return shipping. If not pay for return shipping yourself. Show some character and honesty.
Some people make me ill with how dishonest and immoral they are or have become.

Hmm. They are answering honestly, yet you complain they lack honesty? Ironic.

-SF

SuperDuy
02-14-2011, 08:07 PM
I would definately keep it, 80$ is 80$ company has lots of money. Was sent a 2k dollar camera by mistake before, that I did send back and regretting it so much now. Whenever this happens again will keep it all.

SirGounder
02-14-2011, 08:10 PM
This happened to me once. I emailed the business and told them what happened. They apologized and told me keep the item. I felt better that I let them know. I even offered to ship it back if they paid shipping.

nomie
02-14-2011, 08:25 PM
Hmm. They are answering honestly, yet you complain they lack honesty? Ironic.

-SF

Being honest when it suits you does not make you a honest person. Hmm. :-?

JoelDali
02-14-2011, 10:20 PM
Is it a spoonful of Milos?

JohnnyCracker
02-14-2011, 11:56 PM
simple solution: send it back and charge them $80 for the transaction :mrgreen:

Cindysphinx
02-15-2011, 03:54 AM
I would call and tell them of the mistake. They would probably let me keep it.

If they want it back, they have to pay for the shipping, obviously.

r2473
02-15-2011, 10:32 AM
I can't believe people would actually reply " I'd keep it" as their answer. Where are people's honesty, morals and character?
Some people make me ill with how dishonest and immoral they are or have become.

.....I mean I'd return it and pay for return shipping and toss in $20 in cash for the restocking fee.

Beat that mctennis!!!!

max
02-15-2011, 10:33 AM
Why not return them and keep something better, a clear conscience?

r2473
02-15-2011, 10:39 AM
As we all know, the REAL benefit comes when you are perceived by others as being honest, etc. Not in the actual fact of the matter. That is why nobody in their right mind would ever say they'd keep the stuff IF we knew their identities and it could possibly damage their reputation. In actual fact, I imagine most people would keep the stuff. And not even because they really want the free stuff (maybe). Many people just wouldn't want to hassle with customer service, returning the stuff, etc.

Haven't you read the Republic? People may say they are persuaded by Socrates, but we all know that they really believe (i.e. live in accordance with) Glaucon and what he says.

So yes, I wouldn't rest until the merchandise was returned to its rightful owner.........then I would get to work on ending prostitution in Brazil.......all from my keyboard, because that is "how I roll......dude".

mucat
02-15-2011, 11:25 AM
Big corporation never called me when they made a mistake at my expense. I don't see I should bother do the same.

sureshs
02-15-2011, 11:31 AM
I could call them and return it, but considering to what lengths companies go to hide their telephone numbers (it is usually in a remote place on their web site if at all) and how much hassle they make you go through the menus for any customer service, I would say "screw them."

retlod
02-15-2011, 11:51 AM
I'm not sure if this is an actual law, but I have heard multiple times that if something gets delivered to you that you did not buy/request/order, it is still yours. If not, I'm going to go into business, send each of you a frame, then call you up and demand $1000 (my store's price) for it.

sureshs
02-15-2011, 11:58 AM
Big corporation never called me when they made a mistake at my expense. I don't see I should bother do the same.

My views also. It is unfortunate that some bad experiences should translate into antagonism towards all, but that is the way it is. The customer service you get on credit cards depends on how important you are to them. They could put you into a waiting loop or get an agent immediately. They actually make decisions about whether to route your call overseas or locally based on your importance. I had a big corporation send me two defective items one after the other and refuse to take them back till I talked to a "manager" and he arranged for that to happen without apologizing for what happened. I have had a big airlines treat me like crap and bump me off my flight. I have had corporations keep sending me stuff I did not order and demand payment from me. Too many bad experiences and I think I am pretty justified in being ****ed off at all of them. Sorry if there is some small injustice there, but there is too much of a power differential for me to feel sorry for them.

Bhagi Katbamna
02-15-2011, 12:09 PM
Except it wasn't a big corporation that made the mistake, it was a small store. Besides, are people saying that because some corporations offer poor customer service it is appropriate to steal from the same or another big corporation?

dlk
02-15-2011, 12:15 PM
Except it wasn't a big corporation that made the mistake, it was a small store. Besides, are people saying that because some corporations offer poor customer service it is appropriate to steal from the same or another big corporation?

I like the Karma issue over some company made a mistake "and it's stealing." Maybe it's his good Karma returning itself:) Most of us have had some bad issue with delivery in the past. Before all you 'goodie-two shoes' get bent, I'm purely joking......

sureshs
02-15-2011, 12:16 PM
Except it wasn't a big corporation that made the mistake, it was a small store. Besides, are people saying that because some corporations offer poor customer service it is appropriate to steal from the same or another big corporation?

It is not poor customer service, it is harassment and money stealing that they do. They have a legal department and can backrupt you.

No one is talking about raiding a store. It is about returning something they sent you by mistake. First, it has to be influenced by the experience you had with them about any previous issue. How long did you wait? How were you treated? How many times were you transferred? You mean I should not consider this when I make a decision? If I knew you and you would never agree to speak with me, should I bother to jump through hoops to give you back a $10 bill you dropped? No way.

Secondly, if it is their mistake, they need to tell me before what my incentive is to return it. Will they pay for my gas to go to the UPS store or whatever? Will they take care of my health bills if I injure myself carrying the packet? Will they pay be labor charge for my effort? Let them spell all that out for me first.

Bhagi Katbamna
02-15-2011, 12:25 PM
It is not poor customer service, it is harassment and money stealing that they do. They have a legal department and can backrupt you.

No one is talking about raiding a store. It is about returning something they sent you by mistake. First, it has to be influenced by the experience you had with them about any previous issue. How long did you wait? How were you treated? How many times were you transferred? You mean I should not consider this when I make a decision? If I knew you and you would never agree to speak with me, should I bother to jump through hoops to give you back a $10 bill you dropped? No way.

Secondly, if it is their mistake, they need to tell me before what my incentive is to return it. Will they pay for my gas to go to the UPS store or whatever? Will they take care of my health bills if I injure myself carrying the packet? Will they pay be labor charge for my effort? Let them spell all that out for me first.
I never realized that people have contingencies and conditions that need to occur before they would do the right thing. What I'm getting from this thread is that two wrongs make a right.

dlk
02-15-2011, 12:29 PM
I never realized that people have contingencies and conditions that need to occur before they would do the right thing. What I'm getting from this thread is that two wrongs make a right.

I really believe most of us would do the right thing. Those like me (speaking for others) just say stuff to annoy people. Some folks just are not that serious:)

sureshs
02-15-2011, 12:39 PM
I never realized that people have contingencies and conditions that need to occur before they would do the right thing. What I'm getting from this thread is that two wrongs make a right.

You may be as moralistic as you want, but that is how it is and that is what you will also probably do.

I am not saying I will never return it. If the company was one that had taken care of me well before, I might say that I will reciprocate. Otherwise not.

And I am not going only by size of the company. I had once ordered a special kind of cheese over the internet from a small company. It was sent with the refrigerated transport option. The delivery company delayed by shipment by 1 day and when it did come, it had become absolutely filled with fungus. I called the company and the guy got all upset on me. Said delivery delays are and lack of refrigeration by the delivery company was not his problem. I said you need to make sure your products arrive unspoilt. He wouldn't budge. I simply said I am calling my credit card company to stop payment and also thinking of reporting your business to the authorities for shipping spoilt items creating a health hazard. The guy buckled under the threat and immediately offered a refund.

That is how it is. Business is there to make a buck. Remember how we were asked to "support" the airlines by traveling after 9/11? And I did. And remember how they jacked up their prices immediately after their business came back up?

Cindysphinx
02-15-2011, 12:44 PM
I had something similar happen.

I was having carpet done on my main level and in the basement. Different colors. I paid 50% before the installation.

When the guys came to lay the carpet, they made a mistake and laid the same color in both locations so the basement color is wrong. I didn't catch this error until they were finished. The color difference was slight, but it was there and was not what I ordered.

I called the store and told them about the error and asked that they come out and install the correct color in the basement. They never called me back. I called again; still no reply. So of course I didn't pay the remaining 50%, because they didn't complete the job.

Had there not been an error with the color, I would have paid the 50% even if they had forgotten to bill me. Keeping the 50% would have been stealing.

retlod
02-15-2011, 01:51 PM
I had something similar happen.

I was having carpet done on my main level and in the basement. Different colors. I paid 50% before the installation.

When the guys came to lay the carpet, they made a mistake and laid the same color in both locations so the basement color is wrong. I didn't catch this error until they were finished. The color difference was slight, but it was there and was not what I ordered.

I called the store and told them about the error and asked that they come out and install the correct color in the basement. They never called me back. I called again; still no reply. So of course I didn't pay the remaining 50%, because they didn't complete the job.

Had there not been an error with the color, I would have paid the 50% even if they had forgotten to bill me. Keeping the 50% would have been stealing.

This case illustrates the same principle--honoring and not honoring a contract between two parties. In Cindy's case, the "contract" specified installation of a certain carpet in a certain fashion in exchange for money. The carpet store failed to honor their end of the agreement, so Cindy was justified (in part, anyway) in not honoring hers. Leave it to the lawyers to figure out the details.

In the case of FedererExpress' extra goods, no contract ever existed regarding the extra stuff. The contract involved the ordered items in exchange for money. That contract was honored by both parties. Because the store was not obligated to send the extra merchandise, FE is not obligated to pay for it or return it. Yes, it was a mistake, but sometimes mistakes are painful to make.

I go back to my hypothetical scenario above. What's to stop a company from sending a bunch of stuff out to random people and then demanding payment or expecting you to go through great lengths to return it? There has to be some law that prohibits this!

sureshs
02-15-2011, 02:00 PM
I go back to my hypothetical scenario above. What's to stop a company from sending a bunch of stuff out to random people and then demanding payment or expecting you to go through great lengths to return it? There has to be some law that prohibits this!

Not hypothetical at all. Happened to me at least two times.

My son used to collect stamps. They had a policy of sending some every now and then with the option to cancel partially or fully any future shipments. You can guess what they did. We canceled it, they kept sending it, and billing us. That was one time I really lost it with the customer rep. I felt sorry for her but then I figured since there was no one else to talk to, let her have it. She claimed I had to either pay or ship it back at my expense. I made copies of my cancellation and wrote a letter threatening legal action for harrassment. The bills stopped.

Then I made the mistake of playing in a Breast Cancer thingie (photos are on this forum somewhere). I got a subscription to a magazine for a year. Of course they continued way beyond it and sent me a bill. This time the rep was polite. Her computer showed they knew of the policy very well but were just doing it hoping I would continue.

Businesses will cheat whenever they can. Big companies do it, small companies do it. Don't waste your time feeling sorry for them.

max
02-15-2011, 02:20 PM
As we all know, the REAL benefit comes when you are perceived by others as being honest, etc. Not in the actual fact of the matter. That is why nobody in their right mind would ever say they'd keep the stuff IF we knew their identities and it could possibly damage their reputation. In actual fact, I imagine most people would keep the stuff. And not even because they really want the free stuff (maybe). Many people just wouldn't want to hassle with customer service, returning the stuff, etc.

Haven't you read the Republic? People may say they are persuaded by Socrates, but we all know that they really believe (i.e. live in accordance with) Glaucon and what he says.

So yes, I wouldn't rest until the merchandise was returned to its rightful owner.........then I would get to work on ending prostitution in Brazil.......all from my keyboard, because that is "how I roll......dude".

I learned a very different lesson than you did.

mucat
02-15-2011, 02:39 PM
Except it wasn't a big corporation that made the mistake, it was a small store. Besides, are people saying that because some corporations offer poor customer service it is appropriate to steal from the same or another big corporation?

As long as it is within the boundary of the laws, everything is fair game. Because frankly, that's how big corporations operate.

If it is a small honest shop, by all means, contact them.

max
02-15-2011, 03:30 PM
As long as it is within the boundary of the laws, everything is fair game. Because frankly, that's how big corporations operate.

If it is a small honest shop, by all means, contact them.

I can appreciate that this is the realpolitik perspective.

But at the end of the day, you are you, you have to hold yourself responsible to yourself, and this is the difference between a mere corporation and a real person.

I agree with your implicit notion that corporations act in a self-serving fashion. What's needed is to change corporations, not change people.

mctennis
02-15-2011, 07:47 PM
Hmm. They are answering honestly, yet you complain they lack honesty? Ironic.

-SF

No, I want them to be honest with their actions. They are answering just a survey but not with their name. Irony would be them not returning it and then complaining that they didn't receive something they ordered from another company. Stating someone being dishonest and cheating them out of something they paid for.

mctennis
02-15-2011, 07:50 PM
Why not return them and keep something better, a clear conscience?

Amen. It's a moral issue.

mctennis
02-15-2011, 07:51 PM
.....I mean I'd return it and pay for return shipping and toss in $20 in cash for the restocking fee.

Beat that mctennis!!!!

I can't beat that. You got me there.

Totai
02-15-2011, 08:01 PM
Keep it.
10char

BobFL
02-15-2011, 08:22 PM
Never happened to me. However, USPS guy did deliver Playstation3 and PSP to my address by mistake. I checked the addresses and they were almost identical (pondview vs lakeview, same zip, same number). I found the right address 30 minutes later..

mucat
02-15-2011, 08:56 PM
No, I want them to be honest with their actions. They are answering just a survey but not with their name.


What's your name? How do I know you are not a TW bot? :D


Irony would be them not returning it and then complaining that they didn't receive something they ordered from another company. Stating someone being dishonest and cheating them out of something they paid for.

Because it is within the boundary of the rules (law). Of all the people who bought a lemon vehicle new or used, I don't see the dealers replacing the customers' vehicles with a working one. What's the honesty in that?

What about a mom and pop store going bankrupt and they are making final clearance sale on everything even though they are losing money on all transactions???? Are you going to pay full price to help them out? Is it immoral to "cheat" on their misfortune?

It is part of the risk of doing business, if they don't want to send duplicate items, maybe hiring more qualified staffs? Invest in a better computerized system?

ReopeningWed
02-15-2011, 09:25 PM
I would call back, just to get it off of my conscience.

If this happened with TW, and they happened to go out of business next week, we'd have to shop at other second rate online stores with no forum.

mucat
02-15-2011, 09:50 PM
I would call back, just to get it off of my conscious.

If this happened with TW, and they happened to go out of business next week, we'd have to shop at other second rate online stores with no forum.

TW is different, we are love TW here. :)

mctennis
02-15-2011, 09:51 PM
What's your name? How do I know you are not a TW bot? :D

*** My point is you can answer the poll without having to add your name or TT name to your answer.



Because it is within the boundary of the rules (law). Of all the people who bought a lemon vehicle new or used, I don't see the dealers replacing the customers' vehicles with a working one. What's the honesty in that?

***** If they were an honest dealership they'd take care of it so that person didn't have to hire a d@mn lawyer to get it settled.

What about a mom and pop store going bankrupt and they are making final clearance sale on everything even though they are losing money on all transactions???? Are you going to pay full price to help them out? Is it immoral to "cheat" on their misfortune? People selling items here on TT are usually losing money on all the products they sell as used. If both parties agree on a price nothing wrong with that. However, you're not stealing it from the other person selling it.
**** If they have the price at a loss you are paying them what they ask for it. You're not stuffing that item in your coat to steal it.

It is part of the risk of doing business, if they don't want to send duplicate items, maybe hiring more qualified staffs? Invest in a better computerized system?
**** Nothing will stop loss of all your products. Nothing is 100% full proof.

All my responses are highlighted with a * next to them.

Cooper_Tecnifibre4
02-15-2011, 10:08 PM
Keep it.

Then adopt a little Nigerian kid.

steebo
02-16-2011, 02:50 AM
I'm not religious at all, but that "Do unto others" thing still works for me.
It would be very interesting to know the age breakdown of the folks who want to keep something that isn't theirs, and the ones who would give it back. I'm 55 and would never even consider taking what is not mine if I could get it back to the rightful owners.

Sentinel
02-16-2011, 03:19 AM
I would call and tell them of the mistake. They would probably let me keep it.

If they want it back, they have to pay for the shipping, obviously.

I don't know the details, and i am not an online purchase guy, but I'd call them and ask them to pick it up (i live in a capital city, so they should have an office). I could also drop if off it they are nearby.

Why not return them and keep something better, a clear conscience?
Good one!
Often i buy huge amounts of stuff, come home and find the store charged me less by mistake. I go over and pay up the remainder. I think others are inspired to be honest when they see such cases. It should be a natural thing, not worth even thinking about.

Cindysphinx
02-16-2011, 03:43 AM
Yeah. The people who would keep things they didn't pay for probably don't realize that you usually make out pretty well by just being honest.

I think much of this could be generational. Not that older people are more honest. It's just that having lived on the planet a while gives you more experience. So there will be times when someone saves your bacon by being honest, and you feel an obligation not to be a jerk when you are the one deciding whether to be honest.

Cindysphinx
02-16-2011, 03:49 AM
This case illustrates the same principle--honoring and not honoring a contract between two parties. In Cindy's case, the "contract" specified installation of a certain carpet in a certain fashion in exchange for money. The carpet store failed to honor their end of the agreement, so Cindy was justified (in part, anyway) in not honoring hers. Leave it to the lawyers to figure out the details.

In the case of FedererExpress' extra goods, no contract ever existed regarding the extra stuff. The contract involved the ordered items in exchange for money. That contract was honored by both parties. Because the store was not obligated to send the extra merchandise, FE is not obligated to pay for it or return it. Yes, it was a mistake, but sometimes mistakes are painful to make.

I go back to my hypothetical scenario above. What's to stop a company from sending a bunch of stuff out to random people and then demanding payment or expecting you to go through great lengths to return it? There has to be some law that prohibits this!

Yes, there is a law that prohibits merchants from sending items that were not ordered and then demanding payment. It's called "contracts law." If there was no contract for the delivered goods, then the merchant can't sue under the contract that didn't exist.

All of that is beside the point here.

No one is saying that the OP must pay for the goods not ordered. The question is whether the OP *should* advise the merchant of the error or whether OP instead should just keep the item mistakenly delivered.

What would happen if the merchant realized its mistake immediately and called OP to tell him they would send an employee over to pick up the merchandise? Could the OP bar the door and refuse to give it back? Of course not. **That proves to me that it is morally wrong to keep the goods.** And if it is morally wrong to keep the goods, OP needs to return them or (better yet) just call the merchant and see how they want to handle it.

mctennis
02-16-2011, 04:35 AM
I'm not religious at all, but that "Do unto others" thing still works for me.
It would be very interesting to know the age breakdown of the folks who want to keep something that isn't theirs, and the ones who would give it back. I'm 55 and would never even consider taking what is not mine if I could get it back to the rightful owners.

I agree steebo. I wonder what ages the "keep it" answers are.
Cindyspinx, very good rely. That should just be common moral sense. Looks like some are lacking that item.

mucat
02-16-2011, 08:00 AM
*** My point is you can answer the poll without having to add your name or TT name to your answer.


Got it, thanks for the explanation.




***** If they were an honest dealership they'd take care of it so that person didn't have to hire a d@mn lawyer to get it settled.


First, there is no such thing as an honest dealership. So you assumption is wrong. It is like said if there is magic fairy.


**** If they have the price at a loss you are paying them what they ask for it. You're not stuffing that item in your coat to steal it.


Exactly, you are only keeping what they shipped. You're not stuffing that item in your coat to steal it.



**** Nothing will stop loss of all your products. Nothing is 100% full proof.

All my responses are highlighted with a * next to them.

Thanks for the remind about *, otherwise I probably will not notice :)

mucat
02-16-2011, 08:07 AM
I'm not religious at all, but that "Do unto others" thing still works for me.
It would be very interesting to know the age breakdown of the folks who want to keep something that isn't theirs, and the ones who would give it back. I'm 55 and would never even consider taking what is not mine if I could get it back to the rightful owners.

Actually, if I were younger now, I might give it back. However, as I get older, I learn some companies willing to do and how far they will go to scam customers, avoid responsibilities. So now older and wiser, I say screw them.

However, this is very important to mention this again, for individuals and honest stores, I will not do this. That's where I draw the line.

Dedans Penthouse
02-16-2011, 08:59 AM
Ordered something online. I have ordered from them multiple times from this store, great company with great customer service. This time they sent me an extra item (Worth 80$) on accident. It's not something random, and I could definitely put it to good use. Would you guys return it? Or just keep and credit your random good luck?

Thanks!
Would they consider you a "great customer with great character?"

You're a smart person--you didn't have to post this question. In your heart you know the answer and getting 20 other posters in a poll to tell you otherwise so as to maybe make yourself feel better isn't the answer either. Wanna feel better? Send it back--I guarantee you will. Regards.

Gemini
02-16-2011, 09:04 AM
Let them know you received it by mistake. Chances are they won't go through the hassle to get it back but at least make them aware of the error.

sureshs
02-16-2011, 09:30 AM
I don't know the details, and i am not an online purchase guy, but I'd call them and ask them to pick it up (i live in a capital city, so they should have an office). I could also drop if off it they are nearby.


Good one!
Often i buy huge amounts of stuff, come home and find the store charged me less by mistake. I go over and pay up the remainder. I think others are inspired to be honest when they see such cases. It should be a natural thing, not worth even thinking about.

You need to pay TW thousands of dollars for using their free board.

sureshs
02-16-2011, 09:31 AM
Let them know you received it by mistake. Chances are they won't go through the hassle to get it back but at least make them aware of the error.

Easiest thing to do.


PROVIDED you were able to access them easily when you had problems. If not, screw them.

retlod
02-16-2011, 05:36 PM
What would happen if the merchant realized its mistake immediately and called OP to tell him they would send an employee over to pick up the merchandise? Could the OP bar the door and refuse to give it back? Of course not. **That proves to me that it is morally wrong to keep the goods.** And if it is morally wrong to keep the goods, OP needs to return them or (better yet) just call the merchant and see how they want to handle it.

I'm having trouble understanding this. How can morals be proven? The law would protect OP from the company coming after him/her trying to recover their goods. What would you do if your carpet store came to get back the half of your carpet you didn't pay for?

The Wreck
02-16-2011, 06:05 PM
My opinion, tell them that when they send you a box to return it in, then you'll send it back. You're offering to do the right thing, but there's no reason you should be inconvenienced for their mistake.

RD 7
02-16-2011, 06:24 PM
I think you should keep it in good faith, i.e., don't try to justify it. This isn't about morality. This isn't about what you deserve. This is about what you want.

Don't hide. Admit who you are. It's sexier.

SoBad
02-16-2011, 06:42 PM
I'm having trouble understanding this. How can morals be proven? The law would protect OP from the company coming after him/her trying to recover their goods. What would you do if your carpet store came to get back the half of your carpet you didn't pay for?

You are not the only one having trouble understanding this – the majority of the posters who voted here have the same trouble including myself, as well as the U.S. justice system and the Federal Trade Commission, as we learn from a quick google search:

Q. Am I obligated to return or pay for merchandise I never ordered?
A. No. If you receive merchandise that you didn’t order, you have a legal right to keep it as a free gift.

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/products/pro15.shtm

In short, the recipient (OP or any other person in a similar situation) is entitled by law to keep the item. The high-horse bunch making noise to the contrary in this thread probably steal things (outside of their online life) and feel compelled to preach here to make themselves feel better about their ways.

P.S. And yes, if a merchant rep appeared on the doorstep to collect the item, the victim (customer) would be better off calling the police than trying to subdue the rep on his own.

RD 7
02-16-2011, 07:40 PM
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/products/pro15.shtm

In short, the recipient (OP or any other person in a similar situation) is entitled by law to keep the item. The high-horse bunch making noise to the contrary in this thread probably steal things (outside of their online life) and feel compelled to preach here to make themselves feel better about their ways.


^^^
I don't think the OP was wasting our time with a boring legal question.

Perhaps you're suggesting that there is nothing beyond the legal question here. You might be right (depending on how you set it up) but I'm guessing this is too reductive.

For example:

An employee might be legally permitted to provide zero notice before quitting, but he might feel obligated to provide notice, e.g., perhaps he likes his boss, or perhaps he applies the Golden Rule and decides that he wouldn't want someone to quit on him sans notice. Or...[taking another example:] imagine if you're the only person at the scene of a terrible accident where someone requires immediate medical attention to survive? Though you're not legally obligated to call for help, you may feel an obligation that goes beyond the legal one.

Now, we can discuss what morality means, and whether or not there are things like "moral obligations". And we can discuss whether or not people are altruistic saints or selfish brutes who merely seek to appear moral, or use morality to justify their actions [my vote]. But, regardless of who wins that argument, my guess is that the poster's internal conflict was not merely legal.

Because if it was a simple legal question, he should have said "is it legal to keep [The Complete John Holmes Box Set?]". This would have saved us a lot of time...

r2473
02-16-2011, 08:09 PM
"is it legal to keep [The Complete John Holmes Box Set?]".

Having just purchased this in HD / 3D, I'd say it would be a crime to return it. Wonderful cinema.

mctennis
02-16-2011, 08:45 PM
Got it, thanks for the explanation.
Thanks for the remind about *, otherwise I probably will not notice :)
I don't know how my answers got into the quote. I didn't see my answers at first. That's why I made the * reference. Sort of hard to see what I said and what you said.

The Djoker
02-16-2011, 10:13 PM
Someone in the shipping department who probably makes $10 an hour and made an honest mistake could be in trouble with the boss.

well yeah, but this warehouse worker probably won't be found out or reprimanded if no one brings the mistake to the company's attention. keep the item, it'll save this poor guy his job...

Cindysphinx
02-17-2011, 10:09 AM
You are not the only one having trouble understanding this – the majority of the posters who voted here have the same trouble including myself, as well as the U.S. justice system and the Federal Trade Commission, as we learn from a quick google search:

Q. Am I obligated to return or pay for merchandise I never ordered?
A. No. If you receive merchandise that you didn’t order, you have a legal right to keep it as a free gift.

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/products/pro15.shtm

In short, the recipient (OP or any other person in a similar situation) is entitled by law to keep the item. The high-horse bunch making noise to the contrary in this thread probably steal things (outside of their online life) and feel compelled to preach here to make themselves feel better about their ways.

P.S. And yes, if a merchant rep appeared on the doorstep to collect the item, the victim (customer) would be better off calling the police than trying to subdue the rep on his own.

Let's look at the link you provided:

Q. What should I do if the unordered merchandise I received was the result of an honest shipping error?

A. Write the seller and offer to return the merchandise, provided the seller pays for postage and handling. Give the seller a specific and reasonable amount of time (say 30 days) to pick up the merchandise or arrange to have it returned at no expense to you. Tell the seller that you reserve the right to keep the merchandise or dispose of it after the specified time has passed.

Isn't that exactly what I said? I believe it is.

Really now. You open your front door to find a package from Tiffany's, and you didn't order anything from Tiffany's. Inside the package is $1000 of jewelry your next door neighbor ordered but Tiffany's mistakenly shipped to you. Tiffany's sends you a letter saying they will be sending an employee to pick up the merchandise.

You think you can get away with keeping the jewels?

Cindysphinx
02-17-2011, 10:14 AM
I'm having trouble understanding this. How can morals be proven? The law would protect OP from the company coming after him/her trying to recover their goods. What would you do if your carpet store came to get back the half of your carpet you didn't pay for?

If the carpet store came for the carpet, they could have it, provided they replaced it with the correct carpet. Remember, I wanted them to come back, remove the wrong carpet, and then install the correct carpet. They apparently decided it was cheaper for them to let me keep the wrong carpet (without paying) than to order the right stuff and install.

My conscience is clear. It would not be clear if I had noticed that they failed to bill me and I stayed quiet.

r2473
02-17-2011, 10:17 AM
Really now. You open your front door to find a package from Tiffany's, and you didn't order anything from Tiffany's. Inside the package is $1000 of jewelry your next door neighbor ordered but Tiffany's mistakenly shipped to you. Tiffany's sends you a letter saying they will be sending an employee to pick up the merchandise.

You think you can get away with keeping the jewels?

Trick question. You can't get anything from Tiffany's for $1,000.......not even a blue box.

CHOcobo
02-17-2011, 10:20 AM
no, but they will probably ask for it back if they find out.

Gemini
02-17-2011, 10:28 AM
Years ago, I ordered some shoes from this at the time still very new online shoe company. On two different occasions, they actually duplicated my order but only charged me once. Both times I notified them of the error. The first time, without me prompting, they sent me a return label. The second time they didn't even bother with the label and told me to keep the shoes. I feel you should at least let someone know the error was made and let the offending party decide how they want to deal with it.

sureshs
02-17-2011, 10:49 AM
Let's look at the link you provided:



Isn't that exactly what I said? I believe it is.

Really now. You open your front door to find a package from Tiffany's, and you didn't order anything from Tiffany's. Inside the package is $1000 of jewelry your next door neighbor ordered but Tiffany's mistakenly shipped to you. Tiffany's sends you a letter saying they will be sending an employee to pick up the merchandise.

You think you can get away with keeping the jewels?

How would they prove you have the package? It could have been stolen from outside your front door, for example. If you signed for it, it is a different matter, but you don't say so. Unless they get a search warrant for your home, they can do nothing, I think. You can easily draft a letter asking them to stop the harrassment and get a lawyer involved.

Cindysphinx
02-17-2011, 11:18 AM
^Sure, you can always lie. So then you would be a liar and a thief.

sureshs
02-17-2011, 11:25 AM
^Sure, you can always lie. So then you would be a liar and a thief.

It is not your responsibility to bring strange things from outside and preserve it in your home or carry it around. What if it is a terrorist thing? Remember the mailings with deadly stuff in them?

Personally, this has happened to us a few times and we have always walked up to the correct address and handed it over, and sometimes for a USPS delivery, handed it back to the carrier the next day. But my point is that it is not required and you should not be forced to do it. Say an elderly person with Alzheimer's was in your situation and was then hit with a threatening letter from the company asking him to hand over a package. Will you support it? What if your kids/dogs destroyed the package? Will you pay back $1000? I don't think so. You will do what you can to defend yourself, I think.

Cindysphinx
02-17-2011, 11:38 AM
It is not your responsibility to bring strange things from outside and preserve it in your home or carry it around. What if it is a terrorist thing? Remember the mailings with deadly stuff in them?

Personally, this has happened to us a few times and we have always walked up to the correct address and handed it over, and sometimes for a USPS delivery, handed it back to the carrier the next day. But my point is that it is not required and you should not be forced to do it. Say an elderly person with Alzheimer's was in your situation and was then hit with a threatening letter from the company asking him to hand over a package. Will you support it? What if your kids/dogs destroyed the package? Will you pay back $1000? I don't think so. You will do what you can to defend yourself, I think.

Are you pulling my leg?

If the store realizes its mistake and asks you to return the package, then you hand it over, return it, or give it to its rightful owner.

If your dog ate it, if your house caught fire, if you suffered a heart attack when you saw the word "Tiffany's" and the ambulance driver stole it while you were unconscious , if aliens abducted you, then you are off the hook.

Just don't lie and say you don't have it when you actually do.

Dedans Penthouse
02-17-2011, 11:41 AM
It's passive looting.


well not really, i just thought it sounded cool

sureshs
02-17-2011, 11:45 AM
Are you pulling my leg?

If the store realizes its mistake and asks you to return the package, then you hand it over, return it, or give it to its rightful owner.

If your dog ate it, if your house caught fire, if you suffered a heart attack when you saw the word "Tiffany's" and the ambulance driver stole it while you were unconscious , if aliens abducted you, then you are off the hook.

Just don't lie and say you don't have it when you actually do.

You don't understand. That is what I do, but there is NO requirement to do it and I oppose any action by the store to reclaim the goods by threatening letters. Give them that freedom, and they could do anything, like the cases I mentioned.

Cindysphinx
02-17-2011, 01:18 PM
You don't understand. That is what I do, but there is NO requirement to do it and I oppose any action by the store to reclaim the goods by threatening letters. Give them that freedom, and they could do anything, like the cases I mentioned.

Who said anything about a threatening letter? Common sense suggests that the person or company who misdirected the merchandise would be contrite and apologetic. If they decide to behave like jerks, then of course the recipient can make life difficult in return.

It's a fun question about what would happen if the store misdirected something extremely valuable. Say you order fake diamond earrings from a jeweler and they mistakenly send you real diamonds worth 1000X what you paid (or sent you the cheap ones and the real ones in error). Can you keep the real ones for free? Can the store sue you?

The answer: You lose, I think, because the recipient knew of the mistake and it would be unconscionable to allow the recipient to profit from the mistake.

mucat
02-17-2011, 01:34 PM
It's a fun question about what would happen if the store misdirected something extremely valuable. Say you order fake diamond earrings from a jeweler and they mistakenly send you real diamonds worth 1000X what you paid (or sent you the cheap ones and the real ones in error). Can you keep the real ones for free? Can the store sue you?

Unfortunately for most of us, this situation will never come up. Back to the real world, it is more like we got screwed up by big cooperations and that is just the fact of life. So don't feel so bad or guilty if they make a mistake once in a blue moon to your advantage, take it. Don't worry, they will screw you the next time.

jwilson
02-17-2011, 01:35 PM
Hmm. They are answering honestly, yet you complain they lack honesty? Ironic.

-SFLOL

It is ironic that people are being honest about how they would be dishonest.:shock::)


I believe that I would call the company and let them know what happened. If they want it back, they will issue a call tag for it to be picked up.

Who knows, it may not be worth the trouble to them to get it back, then you can keep it with a clear consciense.

sureshs
02-17-2011, 01:42 PM
Who said anything about a threatening letter? Common sense suggests that the person or company who misdirected the merchandise would be contrite and apologetic. If they decide to behave like jerks, then of course the recipient can make life difficult in return.

It's a fun question about what would happen if the store misdirected something extremely valuable. Say you order fake diamond earrings from a jeweler and they mistakenly send you real diamonds worth 1000X what you paid (or sent you the cheap ones and the real ones in error). Can you keep the real ones for free? Can the store sue you?

The answer: You lose, I think, because the recipient knew of the mistake and it would be unconscionable to allow the recipient to profit from the mistake.

How can they prove that you knew they were genuine?

Cindysphinx
02-17-2011, 02:52 PM
Pardon? How can they prove you knew they were genuine?

The conversation would go like this:

Tiffany's: "Mr. Sureshs, we are so sorry to trouble you, but we accidentally put a pair of real diamonds in with the cubic zirconia you ordered. Those diamonds were supposed to go to someone else, and they are worth $10,000. We are terribly embarrassed about this, and we don't want you to incur any expense or bother. We'd like to send a messenger over to pick it up at a time that is convenient for you so we can get them to the person who bought them."

Sureshs: "Nope, sorry. Besides, how do you know whether I still have them. You can't prove it! You'll never take me alive!"

Tiffany's: "OK, we'll have our lawyers get in touch with you."

I think you know how it would go from there.

sureshs
02-17-2011, 03:18 PM
Pardon? How can they prove you knew they were genuine?

The conversation would go like this:

Tiffany's: "Mr. Sureshs, we are so sorry to trouble you, but we accidentally put a pair of real diamonds in with the cubic zirconia you ordered. Those diamonds were supposed to go to someone else, and they are worth $10,000. We are terribly embarrassed about this, and we don't want you to incur any expense or bother. We'd like to send a messenger over to pick it up at a time that is convenient for you so we can get them to the person who bought them."

Sureshs: "Nope, sorry. Besides, how do you know whether I still have them. You can't prove it! You'll never take me alive!"

Tiffany's: "OK, we'll have our lawyers get in touch with you."

I think you know how it would go from there.

Oh you mean real in addition to fake? First you said real instead of fake.

In either case, they can't prove anything.

I will have the guy who comes over arrested for harrassment.

Cindysphinx
02-17-2011, 03:26 PM
Oh you mean real in addition to fake? First you said real instead of fake.

In either case, they can't prove anything.

I will have the guy who comes over arrested for harrassment.

Doesn't matter if they send you fake + real or just real. Either way, they misdirected the item and they have told you they want it back.

Don't worry. The messenger won't come over unless you say it is OK. If you won't return the jewels, they will skip that step and go straight to court.

You know, my credit card was stolen many months ago. The thieves used it to purchase some useless stuff -- a Colorado Avalanche keychain and a subscription to a Canadian hockey magazine. These things came to my house in the mail, addressed to some fictitious person.

I kept the keychain in a drawer for a long time. I don't know why. I guess I was worried that maybe the vendor would want it, and I didn't want to say I had tossed it in the trash? It just didn't feel right to use it.

The hockey magazine is still coming to the house, even though the charges were reversed.

sureshs
02-17-2011, 03:53 PM
Doesn't matter if they send you fake + real or just real. Either way, they misdirected the item and they have told you they want it back.

Don't worry. The messenger won't come over unless you say it is OK. If you won't return the jewels, they will skip that step and go straight to court.

You know, my credit card was stolen many months ago. The thieves used it to purchase some useless stuff -- a Colorado Avalanche keychain and a subscription to a Canadian hockey magazine. These things came to my house in the mail, addressed to some fictitious person.

I kept the keychain in a drawer for a long time. I don't know why. I guess I was worried that maybe the vendor would want it, and I didn't want to say I had tossed it in the trash? It just didn't feel right to use it.

The hockey magazine is still coming to the house, even though the charges were reversed.

You keep saying they will go to court. Yet you don't say how they will prove they sent you an extra real diamond along with the fake one. That is what I want to know.

SoBad
02-17-2011, 07:07 PM
Let's look at the link you provided:



Isn't that exactly what I said? I believe it is.

Really now. You open your front door to find a package from Tiffany's, and you didn't order anything from Tiffany's. Inside the package is $1000 of jewelry your next door neighbor ordered but Tiffany's mistakenly shipped to you. Tiffany's sends you a letter saying they will be sending an employee to pick up the merchandise.

You think you can get away with keeping the jewels?

The question and answer you cherry-picked from the webpage I quoted deals with a special case where the package recipient has specific knowledge of the reason for the delivery of an item not ordered. Households cannot be reasonably expected to analyze potential reasons for unexpected deliveries or provide safe custody or logistics services for merchandise delivered to them in error through no fault of their own.

Doesn't matter if they send you fake + real or just real. Either way, they misdirected the item and they have told you they want it back.

Don't worry. The messenger won't come over unless you say it is OK. If you won't return the jewels, they will skip that step and go straight to court.

You know, my credit card was stolen many months ago. The thieves used it to purchase some useless stuff -- a Colorado Avalanche keychain and a subscription to a Canadian hockey magazine. These things came to my house in the mail, addressed to some fictitious person.

I kept the keychain in a drawer for a long time. I don't know why. I guess I was worried that maybe the vendor would want it, and I didn't want to say I had tossed it in the trash? It just didn't feel right to use it.

The hockey magazine is still coming to the house, even though the charges were reversed.

So you did actually have unordered merchandise delivered to you in error (keychain and magazine subscription), and you had specific knowledge of the reasons for those erroneous deliveries. Yet it is clear from your own statement that you made no attempt to return any of this merchandise, which directly contradicts your high-horse preaching to the contrary throughout your voluminous and verbose posting in this thread. I knew I was right about the high-horse bunch in this thread stealing things in “real life”, but I admit I did not expect them to volunteer evidence.:lol:

Fandango
02-17-2011, 09:28 PM
I would say keep it. If you called and reported the mistake, you could be rewarded with a small coupon/discount with the expense of firing an low wage employee.

And who is really benefiting from this? the ceo who is already making millions? hardly. If you do good it will come back to you, are you really doing something that much good?


If someone loses their cell phone regardless of what kind, I would turn it in.

This is different. Maybe this is good karma.

Have you heard this joke?

There was a guy in the ocean drowning. He prayed to god to save him. Two boats came and asked if he needed help. The guy replied twice, "No thanks god will save me". The guy drowned and went to heaven. He asked god why he didn't save him. God said, "I sent you two boats dummy".

Sentinel
02-17-2011, 09:58 PM
This has become very complicated.

JohnnyCracker
02-17-2011, 11:23 PM
So you did actually have unordered merchandise delivered to you in error (keychain and magazine subscription), and you had specific knowledge of the reasons for those erroneous deliveries. Yet it is clear from your own statement that you made no attempt to return any of this merchandise, which directly contradicts your high-horse preaching to the contrary throughout your voluminous and verbose posting in this thread. I knew I was right about the high-horse bunch in this thread stealing things in “real life”, but I admit I did not expect them to volunteer evidence.:lol:

OOPSIES!! :mrgreen:

Cindysphinx
02-18-2011, 06:32 AM
The question and answer you cherry-picked from the webpage I quoted deals with a special case where the package recipient has specific knowledge of the reason for the delivery of an item not ordered. Households cannot be reasonably expected to analyze potential reasons for unexpected deliveries or provide safe custody or logistics services for merchandise delivered to them in error through no fault of their own.

I believe that is what happened in the OP.

The web site you quoted primarily deals with instances where a shady merchant sends a person something they didn't order out of the blue, then demands payment. This used to be a popular scam, especially against senior citizens.

Households surely can open a package realize that an expensive item has been misdirected and pick up the phone and call the sender.



So you did actually have unordered merchandise delivered to you in error (keychain and magazine subscription), and you had specific knowledge of the reasons for those erroneous deliveries. Yet it is clear from your own statement that you made no attempt to return any of this merchandise, which directly contradicts your high-horse preaching to the contrary throughout your voluminous and verbose posting in this thread. I knew I was right about the high-horse bunch in this thread stealing things in “real life”, but I admit I did not expect them to volunteer evidence.:lol:

Actually, I will explain further since you seem to be interested.

Small package arrives with my address but addressed to someone named Walter. It sits on my counter a while, with me figuring my husband ordered it and him figuring I ordered it. (We don't talk much, apparently!).

Then an issue of Hockey Magazine arrives, also addressed to Walter. This too sits in a big pile of mail.

My credit card bill arrives. I see a charge of about $5 to a merchant I don't know. I make a mental note to ask my husband about this.

I also see a charge of $20 to Hockey Canada or some such. Still, I'm not connecting the dots. My husband finally figures out that our credit card number has been compromised. We open the small package that has been sitting on the counter, as it we recognize it as having been addressed to Walter. Inside we find the keychain but no invoice (weird, eh?). We briefly consider that this is being sent to us as a gift from relatives who live in Colorado, but they say they sent no such gift.

I call the credit card company and tell them the whole tale. I ask what I should do about the keychain and magazine. They say to discard them.

Had either merchant wanted the merchandise back, I suppose they could have contacted me and I would have sent it back at their expense. They did not, of course.

I suppose I could call the hockey magazine company and alert them that they can stop sending their magazines. I would, except that I am not willing to incur the cost of an international call. Besides, by now they should have figured out that the charges for Walter's subscription were reversed months ago.

So. I think my position on my high horse is quite secure, thanks.

Cindysphinx
02-18-2011, 06:37 AM
You keep saying they will go to court. Yet you don't say how they will prove they sent you an extra real diamond along with the fake one. That is what I want to know.

They will prove it by asking you when you testify.

You will tell the truth and admit that you received the jewels.

If you lie, you will be a perjuring thief.

Or maybe you will have realized that you will need to hire a lawyer to defend you, so you might just decide to cut your losses and give back the jewels.

sureshs
02-18-2011, 06:53 AM
They will prove it by asking you when you testify.

You will tell the truth and admit that you received the jewels.

If you lie, you will be a perjuring thief.

Or maybe you will have realized that you will need to hire a lawyer to defend you, so you might just decide to cut your losses and give back the jewels.

The case will be dismissed even before it goes to trial.

When I get a package, I am usually irritated with the packaging and will toss everything except the product into the waste. I will get rid off the packaging material, FCC warnings, etc. In that process, I might have thrown out anything else to.

There is no way a judge is going to hear the case. Or ever prove that I am lying without a machine test, which he will not adminster.

C'mon, Cindy, you know you are wrong.

PimpMyGame
02-18-2011, 07:00 AM
Firstly, I don't buy the argument that big corporations do it to consumers so there is no problem in doing it back. There is no need to stoop to a lower level. But I buy the karma thing, always treat people as you would expect to be treated.

I say call them and tell them about their mistake. If it is a great company as you say, they will learn from this error and will save money in the future which can be passed on to lower customer prices. Worst case is they will ask you to return it, which should be at their expense. Best case they will deem it uneconomical to pay for it to be shipped back, logged into inventory and stored so you get to keep it.

Cindysphinx
02-18-2011, 10:32 AM
The case will be dismissed even before it goes to trial.

When I get a package, I am usually irritated with the packaging and will toss everything except the product into the waste. I will get rid off the packaging material, FCC warnings, etc. In that process, I might have thrown out anything else to.

There is no way a judge is going to hear the case. Or ever prove that I am lying without a machine test, which he will not adminster.

C'mon, Cindy, you know you are wrong.

I guess we can agree to disagree.

You either have the item that was sent to you, or you don't. If you have it, you would tell the truth ('cause you are an honest guy). If you told the truth, you'd have to give it back.

If you honestly did not have it, then you would say that.

If you had it but lied and said you didn't, you might or might not get away with it.

Funny story. Way, way back in the day, I was in high school. We took a field trip to court to watch a trial. To this day, I remember the trial. The defendant was a woman who owned some jewelry. She claimed it was stolen on a particular date, and she filed an insurance claim and police report. She was being tried for insurance fraud and a false police report.

It turned out that she pawned/sold the items. Her undoing was the date on the pawn slip, which was after the theft. The witness that day was the pawn shop owner. Her defense (pawn shop receipt had wrong date) wasn't going to wash because the shop's receipt was still in chronological order in the book with all the other receipts. Ooops.

So. Maybe you could lie and then find a way to sell the goods in a way that wouldn't be traced back to you. I would suggest you not use E-bay! :)

jmverdugo
02-18-2011, 12:48 PM
I would call them, let it ring 3 times, if they do not answer I would have to keep it due lack of answer of the seller ... sorry, I did try to return it - my conscience is clear... ;)

Buffster
02-18-2011, 01:04 PM
Depends on the company it concerns. If it's a multinational like Microsoft I definitely wouldn't return it, with a small company I definitely would. I'm kinda like Robin Hood in a way, now I think about it ;)

SoBad
02-18-2011, 08:06 PM
I believe that is what happened in the OP.
The web site you quoted primarily deals with instances where a shady merchant sends a person something they didn't order out of the blue, then demands payment. This used to be a popular scam, especially against senior citizens.
Households surely can open a package realize that an expensive item has been misdirected and pick up the phone and call the sender.
Actually, I will explain further since you seem to be interested.
Your beliefs have been exposed as misguided here and there are no references to “shady merchants” or “senior citizens” on the FTC page that I linked. As for my interest here, it is to provide the OP with reasonable advice and protect the OP from bad advice.
Small package arrives with my address but addressed to someone named Walter. It sits on my counter a while, with me figuring my husband ordered it and him figuring I ordered it. (We don't talk much, apparently!).

Then an issue of Hockey Magazine arrives, also addressed to Walter. This too sits in a big pile of mail.

My credit card bill arrives. I see a charge of about $5 to a merchant I don't know. I make a mental note to ask my husband about this.

I also see a charge of $20 to Hockey Canada or some such. Still, I'm not connecting the dots. My husband finally figures out that our credit card number has been compromised. We open the small package that has been sitting on the counter, as it we recognize it as having been addressed to Walter. Inside we find the keychain but no invoice (weird, eh?). We briefly consider that this is being sent to us as a gift from relatives who live in Colorado, but they say they sent no such gift.
So a package arrives at your house addressed to a “Walter” and sits inside your house for a good while because you assume that your husband is Walter and your husband assumes that you are Walter. It’s obvious that you’re lying here, but it doesn’t matter what I think, because in a criminal trial you’d have a good chance of at least one housewife on the jury believing this tall tale enough to warrant reasonable doubt, which is precisely the reason why such case could never make it to trial.
I kept the keychain in a drawer for a long time. I don't know why. I guess I was worried that maybe the vendor would want it, and I didn't want to say I had tossed it in the trash? It just didn't feel right to use it.
I call the credit card company and tell them the whole tale. I ask what I should do about the keychain and magazine. They say to discard them.

Had either merchant wanted the merchandise back, I suppose they could have contacted me and I would have sent it back at their expense. They did not, of course.

I suppose I could call the hockey magazine company and alert them that they can stop sending their magazines. I would, except that I am not willing to incur the cost of an international call. Besides, by now they should have figured out that the charges for Walter's subscription were reversed months ago.
You contacted the credit card company because you were concerned about the charges. You did not contact the merchant because you were not concerned about the merchandise that came into your possession by error that you knew about. You made no attempt to return the merchandise, to notify the merchant of the errant delivery, or to donate the merchandise to an animal shelter. You kept it, isn't that right?
So. I think my position on my high horse is quite secure, thanks.
Indeed, if Felony is a breed and Perjury is the name of the horse.

a_2c+
02-18-2011, 08:46 PM
wow. it has indeed gotten complicated.

clusterf_ck for the win.

Gemini
02-19-2011, 07:58 AM
Agreed. Probably more complicated than it should be. Lots of assumptions about the nature of the company but all we know from the original post is that OP does have a good opinion of the company and has been generally happy with the level of service he's received. In my mind, that at least deserves the courtesy of letting them know about their current error.

sureshs
02-19-2011, 08:46 AM
I guess we can agree to disagree.

You either have the item that was sent to you, or you don't. If you have it, you would tell the truth ('cause you are an honest guy). If you told the truth, you'd have to give it back.

If you honestly did not have it, then you would say that.

If you had it but lied and said you didn't, you might or might not get away with it.

Funny story. Way, way back in the day, I was in high school. We took a field trip to court to watch a trial. To this day, I remember the trial. The defendant was a woman who owned some jewelry. She claimed it was stolen on a particular date, and she filed an insurance claim and police report. She was being tried for insurance fraud and a false police report.

It turned out that she pawned/sold the items. Her undoing was the date on the pawn slip, which was after the theft. The witness that day was the pawn shop owner. Her defense (pawn shop receipt had wrong date) wasn't going to wash because the shop's receipt was still in chronological order in the book with all the other receipts. Ooops.

So. Maybe you could lie and then find a way to sell the goods in a way that wouldn't be traced back to you. I would suggest you not use E-bay! :)

I could just use the item, not sell it. Or give it to someone after 20 years. I could get caught if the company hires detectives to spy on me and I am happen to be using it. This has been done by companies to disprove claims of disability by their employees. So many possibilities. But as someone has shown from the FTC's rules, there is no law requiring you to return it, and that stands. Personally, I would return it if 1. I can contact the company easily, not an easy thing these days 2. They will pay for the return, including arranging for a delivery guy to come to my place to pick it up 3. It is not overly inconvenient to me, for example, if I am single and traveling frequently and cannot be at home in a certain range of time, I cannot do it.

Tar Heel Tennis
02-19-2011, 08:53 AM
Ordered something online. I have ordered from them multiple times from this store, great company with great customer service. This time they sent me an extra item (Worth 80$) on accident. It's not something random, and I could definitely put it to good use. Would you guys return it? Or just keep and credit your random good luck?

Thanks!

if you're a thief, then you'll keep it.

i suppose there's consolation that you at least are torn enough to make this thread. you will learn a lot about yourself in how you react. if you are an honest person, you'll return the item, or at least make the effort. who knows, if you contact the company, they may tell you to keep the item (it's happened to me in the past). then you can enjoy it guilt-free.

but if you don't return/contact the store, then you are knowingly keeping something you didn't pay for - stealing.

it's your ethical dilemma - i hope you make the right choice

retlod
02-19-2011, 09:08 AM
but if you don't return/contact the store, then you are knowingly keeping something you didn't pay for - stealing.

So people who accept gifts are stealing? Because they're knowlingly keeping something that they didn't pay for...

sureshs
02-19-2011, 09:20 AM
As far as I know, legal precedent is that a gift cannot be asked back for. I believe this has been through the courts.

sureshs
02-19-2011, 09:26 AM
Cindy, I sent you a Wilson BLX 6.1 Tour by mistake. Please return it to me at once.

max
02-20-2011, 11:35 AM
It's disappointing seeing the poll results here. I see no reason for those who would keep other people's property, to keep it. Why not steal a bicycle from a child, or money from your grandmother? All you're doing by keeping stuff from a "greedy corporation" is losing your own soul.

max
02-20-2011, 11:38 AM
This has become very complicated.

It really isn't. You're either honest or you are not.

The people making the matter seems complicated are simply doing this to muddy the water and justify to THEMSELVES as well as to us, their thievery.

Hint: sometimes the more complicated answer and interpretation shows a deliberate attempt to alter the facts of a case.

retlod
02-20-2011, 03:30 PM
The people making the matter seems complicated are simply doing this to muddy the water and justify to THEMSELVES as well as to us, their thievery.

I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to start shouting this in a few posts: keeping goods that were sent to you, whether you ordered them or not, whether you paid for them or not, is not a crime. It is not theft. Therefore, people who choose to do so cannot be thiefs. I'm not sure why people can't understand this.

Objectively, this is a complicated matter because of relativistic morals, however, thankfully, it is the law that makes the situation simple. If it helps moral people sleep at night, then they can feel free to return the goods and expend however much time and effort it takes to do so. I, for one, am grateful for the laws that protect me in a situation such as this. I'm sure that if those laws didn't exist, we would undoubtedly receive as many spam packages in the mail as we receive spam e-mails in our inboxes, except every package would threaten to cost us untold sums of money if we didn't waste our time dealing with it.

Is there a person among us who would travel halfway around the globe at their own expense to return a 5-cent piece of candy that accidentally found its way into a grocery bag while on vacation in Nepal in a store that is so remote that it receives no mail or package delivery service? If not, then we're all immoral thiefs (if you said yes, that you would spend $5000+ and a week of your time to give back a 5-cent item that you received by mistake, you are either lying or stupid). Oh, the humanity! What is the world coming to? Are there no more honest, virtuous people anymore? Doesn't that sound ridiculous? It is. It's moral relativism. If it's easy to be moral, we do it. If it's hard, well, then we have to start putting prices on being moral, don't we.

I used to be a black-and-white thinker. Now I'm older and wiser, and I see everything in shades of gray.

Talker
02-20-2011, 03:52 PM
Could be the person who sent it by mistake took the item out of stock, so it could be traced to that person. He would get fired or have to pay for the item himself... possibly.

You can call them and tell them you didn't get the warranty with the item and would like to just have the warranty money refunded.

Seriously, just be truthful the best you can you don't need anyone to tell you that. :)

dennis10is
02-20-2011, 07:34 PM
I got some extra weapon grade uranium the other day, and I decided to keep it.

I just didn't want the hassle of sending it back, and having to declare the content of the package.

ProgressoR
02-20-2011, 10:38 PM
If its not illegal (to just keep it and not say anything at all), its dis-honest, that is clear.

Just tell them what happened and let them decide and if they want it back they cover the cost.

What is so hard about that.

So much obfuscation about a very very simple topic.

Are you a lawyer?


I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to start shouting this in a few posts: keeping goods that were sent to you, whether you ordered them or not, whether you paid for them or not, is not a crime. It is not theft. Therefore, people who choose to do so cannot be thiefs. I'm not sure why people can't understand this.

Objectively, this is a complicated matter because of relativistic morals, however, thankfully, it is the law that makes the situation simple. If it helps moral people sleep at night, then they can feel free to return the goods and expend however much time and effort it takes to do so. I, for one, am grateful for the laws that protect me in a situation such as this. I'm sure that if those laws didn't exist, we would undoubtedly receive as many spam packages in the mail as we receive spam e-mails in our inboxes, except every package would threaten to cost us untold sums of money if we didn't waste our time dealing with it.

Is there a person among us who would travel halfway around the globe at their own expense to return a 5-cent piece of candy that accidentally found its way into a grocery bag while on vacation in Nepal in a store that is so remote that it receives no mail or package delivery service? If not, then we're all immoral thiefs (if you said yes, that you would spend $5000+ and a week of your time to give back a 5-cent item that you received by mistake, you are either lying or stupid). Oh, the humanity! What is the world coming to? Are there no more honest, virtuous people anymore? Doesn't that sound ridiculous? It is. It's moral relativism. If it's easy to be moral, we do it. If it's hard, well, then we have to start putting prices on being moral, don't we.

I used to be a black-and-white thinker. Now I'm older and wiser, and I see everything in shades of gray.

PCXL-Fan
02-20-2011, 11:01 PM
For me it depends. If it was a company that I felt had mistreated me in the past or had pilfered me of money I probably would not return it .
If it was a company I respected and felt were good corporate citizens then yeah I'd probably return it.

If it was an individual seller on e-bay, then yes I'd return it.

I follow this with videogame/movie companies & music artists. I purchase 100% of my games/movies/books that I want because I respect those that make them who make them and want to support them.

max
02-21-2011, 06:30 AM
I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to start shouting this in a few posts: keeping goods that were sent to you, whether you ordered them or not, whether you paid for them or not, is not a crime. It is not theft. Therefore, people who choose to do so cannot be thiefs. I'm not sure why people can't understand this.


I used to be a black-and-white thinker. Now I'm older and wiser, and I see everything in shades of gray.

I may be older and wiser than you. And I start to see malarkey even before I smell it. You know this, too.

I think you're wrong in your definition of theft. The decision to keep something that fell in your hands is a conscious choice to hold another's property.

Sorry.