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flyinghippos101
02-19-2011, 09:39 PM
I thought since there seems to be a good congregation of people around the same age on the forums (seniors) , I thought it would be a good thread for discussion on University, admittance, future plans, applications, etc. etc. Might be even a good reference thread for future prospective uni students as well :)

GetBetterer
02-19-2011, 11:15 PM
Have fun getting in.

Universities right now are searching for two things:

1. Diversity (ethnically, stuff you do, etc.)
2. Community Service (this is actually at the top of the list right now, so if you're in like boy scouts or something with decent grades in the B's and A's your chances of getting in are higher)

Mansewerz
02-20-2011, 10:37 AM
Senior here, and i'm excited/nervous for next year. Here are my schools/decisions.

-Stanford: Denied early admission, no waitlist
-University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign: Accepted
-Harvard: waiting
-Princeton: waiting
-Yale: waiting
-Duke: waiting
-Northwestern: waiting
-University of Southern California: waiting
-Wash U in St. Louis: waiting

As you can see, still waiting on many schools. April 1st is the big day! How about everyone else?

GetBetterer
02-20-2011, 10:46 AM
Mansewerz:
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign: Accepted

My friend is graduating from there this year. It's a really good school, especially compared to Ivy League. The Ivy League schools are 99% bookwork, 1% hands-on work. University of Illinois is 85% bookwork, 15% hands-on work.
Wash U in St. Louis: waiting

Decent school and it's in a good location (nice weather for Tennis especially) although I've only been there over the summer to visit family.

Polaris
02-20-2011, 11:51 AM
-University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign: Accepted

UIUC is a _great_ school. Congratulations!!

flyinghippos101
02-20-2011, 01:33 PM
Senior here, and i'm excited/nervous for next year. Here are my schools/decisions.

-Stanford: Denied early admission, no waitlist
-University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign: Accepted
-Harvard: waiting
-Princeton: waiting
-Yale: waiting
-Duke: waiting
-Northwestern: waiting
-University of Southern California: waiting
-Wash U in St. Louis: waiting

As you can see, still waiting on many schools. April 1st is the big day! How about everyone else?

I was an idiot and missed out on early admissions, I self reported grades the day after the deadline. My list atm, haven't heard back from any yet.

-Mcgill
-Western
-Dalhousie
-York
-U of Ottawa

Excited for next year aswell but gotta admit, gonna miss High School

Jonny S&V
02-20-2011, 01:35 PM
Decent school and it's in a good location (nice weather for Tennis especially) although I've only been there over the summer to visit family.

It's a very, VERY good academic school, and a very good tennis school (highly ranked in DIII, just got 2nd in the indoor nationals the other day).

flyinghippos101
02-20-2011, 01:39 PM
Manswerz, what are you looking to do for your undergrad?

Mansewerz
02-20-2011, 05:11 PM
Mansewerz:


My friend is graduating from there this year. It's a really good school, especially compared to Ivy League. The Ivy League schools are 99% bookwork, 1% hands-on work. University of Illinois is 85% bookwork, 15% hands-on work.


Decent school and it's in a good location (nice weather for Tennis especially) although I've only been there over the summer to visit family.

I've heard it's great from many. I've got a brother there right now and a cousin who graduated. My only gripe is that it's where practically everyone from my school goes. I wanna break away and go far from home (Chicago suburb) and start off all on my own.

UIUC is a _great_ school. Congratulations!!

Thanks! I had it as a backup, but i'm still very happy to have gotten in.

I was an idiot and missed out on early admissions, I self reported grades the day after the deadline. My list atm, haven't heard back from any yet.

-Mcgill
-Western
-Dalhousie
-York
-U of Ottawa

Excited for next year aswell but gotta admit, gonna miss High School

Ouch, sorry to hear. What's your top choice? All Canadian schools?
It's a very, VERY good academic school, and a very good tennis school (highly ranked in DIII, just got 2nd in the indoor nationals the other day).

Yes, they're very good academically and at tennis. I doubt i'd play there, though i'm considering it.

Manswerz, what are you looking to do for your undergrad?

Right now I plan on going the biology route to set myself up for a Pre-med track. However, I have contemplated economics in case I choose against becoming a doctor or I can't get in. One of my other paths i'm considering is research/becoming a professor.

GetBetterer
02-20-2011, 06:25 PM
Mansewerz:
I've heard it's great from many. I've got a brother there right now and a cousin who graduated. My only gripe is that it's where practically everyone from my school goes. I wanna break away and go far from home (Chicago suburb) and start off all on my own.

Ah I see. Well, I don't quite know why you would want to live in a place where the income tax just got raised by 66% and has the highest unemployment percentage right now, but have fun!

Mansewerz
02-20-2011, 06:37 PM
Mansewerz:


Ah I see. Well, I don't quite know why you would want to live in a place where the income tax just got raised by 66% and has the highest unemployment percentage right now, but have fun!

Wait, where exactly did income tax raise by 66% that now has the highest unemployment rate? If you mean chicago, then you misunderstood. I'm from a chicago suburb.

Manus Domini
02-20-2011, 07:11 PM
My choices (am Junior):

Swarthmore
Bard (toss up between the two in favorite)
Vassar
Bucknell (as back-up)
Connecticut College
Yale
Princeton
Drew
Maybe a Canadian school in case the Republican movement gets even bigger

Denison seems to want me a lot (Get mail from them constantly) but I'm not allowed to apply to schools in Ohio (or outside of a ~3 hour distance for that matter)
If I went to Auburn, I'd get a living stipend, but I was told it isn't for me.

RealityPolice
02-20-2011, 08:07 PM
Mansewerz--

One thing that's problematic for Illinois universities right now is the budget crunch; the state owes the universities more than $100 million right now, and the universities are getting clobbered by it. I'm at SIU, and the budget crisis is hurting the university big time. If you do a school visit, ask how your department is faring with cutbacks and faculty furloughs and such. It sounds trivial, but if someone was looking to enroll at SIU, I'd tell them to go elsewhere (probably out of state, if possible). Well-established private schools are a good option, too.

flyinghippos101
02-20-2011, 08:07 PM
r

Denison seems to want me a lot (Get mail from them constantly) but I'm not allowed to apply to schools in Ohio (or outside of a ~3 hour distance for that matter)

Ah yes, those schools

There's a reason why Concordia and Bishops is off ma list. Way too many emails


Ouch, sorry to hear. What's your top choice? All Canadian schools?


Yup, at the moment my top choice is McGill but it seems pretty unlikely that I'll get in. Granted my average is around a respectable 90-92 % but it gets pretty competitive when it comes to undergrad from what I hear. And I don't think the tennis facilities are anything to brag about either...well except for York. And yes, all my selections are in Canada. Even though I'm planning on leaving home, I'm afraid the US is simply too far and too much of a change from my beloved lobster shack up here in the north

Plus I'm kinda poor too. Parents aren't paying a cent, guess they're trying to humble me

RealityPolice
02-20-2011, 08:11 PM
My choices (am Junior):

Swarthmore
Bard (toss up between the two in favorite)
Vassar
Bucknell (as back-up)
Connecticut College
Yale
Princeton
Drew
Maybe a Canadian school in case the Republican movement gets even bigger



Bard is a great school; excellent faculty and a great student-faculty ratio. Very expensive, though (not that Swarthmore isn't).

Mansewerz
02-20-2011, 08:14 PM
Mansewerz--

One thing that's problematic for Illinois universities right now is the budget crunch; the state owes the universities more than $100 million right now, and the universities are getting clobbered by it. I'm at SIU, and the budget crisis is hurting the university big time. If you do a school visit, ask how your department is faring with cutbacks and faculty furloughs and such. It sounds trivial, but if someone was looking to enroll at SIU, I'd tell them to go elsewhere (probably out of state, if possible). Well-established private schools are a good option, too.

Ah, I see. My preference is out of state, as I have lived in Illinois all of my life and want to get out. My brother goes to U of I, and I believe they are raising tuition again! Meanwhile, the president just got a pay increase :mad:

The budget state of Illinois does not look good at all right now.

Are you at Carbondale?

RealityPolice
02-20-2011, 08:34 PM
Ah, I see. My preference is out of state, as I have lived in Illinois all of my life and want to get out. My brother goes to U of I, and I believe they are raising tuition again! Meanwhile, the president just got a pay increase :mad:

The budget state of Illinois does not look good at all right now.

Are you at Carbondale?

Yeah. Or Carbonjail, as they call it. Desolate, soul-crushing culturelessness.

SIU has been through five chancellors in the last seven years; our most recent provost quit after three weeks on the job, and the current chancellor started targeting the faculty unions around Christmastime. Ugly, ugly forces are at work. Meanwhile, the infrastructure is falling apart, enrollment is dropping, and tuition (as at UI) is going up. But hey--we just got a brand new football stadium and renovations to the basketball arena (including a huge new tutoring center that only athletes can use) for $80 million, and they only quadrupled student fees to get some of the money!

What's sad is that even if the state paid up, I'm sure the university would squander the money somehow.

Good luck in your search. Wash U is a great school, BTW.

Mansewerz
02-20-2011, 09:06 PM
Thanks RealityPolice. I wish you luck with SIU. It's a shame that education is getting put on the backburner while war and politics get the most attention. Illinois just recently passed other legislation that points the finger at teachers and royally screws them some more. Maybe people need to start realizing that the problem has other causes.

GetBetterer
02-20-2011, 09:37 PM
Mansewerz:
Wait, where exactly did income tax raise by 66% that now has the highest unemployment rate? If you mean chicago, then you misunderstood. I'm from a chicago suburb.

Illinois is known to have the highest unemployment rates (with Chicago being the first place to be hit) in recessions and just in general (Great Depression had an unemployment rate of 50%, and right now it's like 29%) mainly because of the heavily industry-based factories on which they run.

As for the 66% income tax increase, it's real. The income tax rate went from 3% to 5%, a 66% increase in the income tax.

My information isn't obscured, it's biased! ^_^

Mansewerz
02-20-2011, 10:04 PM
Mansewerz:


Illinois is known to have the highest unemployment rates (with Chicago being the first place to be hit) in recessions and just in general (Great Depression had an unemployment rate of 50%, and right now it's like 29%) mainly because of the heavily industry-based factories on which they run.

As for the 66% income tax increase, it's real. The income tax rate went from 3% to 5%, a 66% increase in the income tax.

My information isn't obscured, it's biased! ^_^

I see what you meant above now. I know of teachers that supported the tax increase as it helped pay off the deficit the crooked government officials helped cause. And, I want to leave Illinois. I'd like to go to one of the coasts, at least for college.

GetBetterer
02-20-2011, 11:30 PM
Mansewerz:
I see what you meant above now. I know of teachers that supported the tax increase as it helped pay off the deficit the crooked government officials helped cause. And, I want to leave Illinois. I'd like to go to one of the coasts, at least for college.

But Rahmbo Emanuel is about to be Mayor over there. Why would you want to leave? He'll be all like:

"YOU CAN STICK THAT CORRUPT BRIBING MONEY, RIGHT UP YOUR @$$!" and we would all lol.

Manus Domini
02-21-2011, 07:06 AM
Bard is a great school; excellent faculty and a great student-faculty ratio. Very expensive, though (not that Swarthmore isn't).

heard it is pretty generous with financial aid though

Manus Domini
02-21-2011, 07:10 AM
Thanks RealityPolice. I wish you luck with SIU. It's a shame that education is getting put on the backburner while war and politics get the most attention. Illinois just recently passed other legislation that points the finger at teachers and royally screws them some more. Maybe people need to start realizing that the problem has other causes.

lol education=politics in today's America.

In NJ, Chris Christy (the SOB he is) blames teachers and the unions for our huge debt (like the politicians, housing crisis, and wallstreet were all benefactors that helped NJ's budget) and took all funding from some of the best schools in the state.

Look at Wisconsin and Ohio, those guys are trying to do away with the teachers blaming them for the debts.

Btw, in Wisconsin, notice how it is the groups that went against the current governor that are getting the pain (teachers/jail wardens) while those who supported him are not (police, firefighters)

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
02-22-2011, 10:58 AM
^ Sorry, gonna have to flag last entry- Politics is verbotten here by decree from the top.

But I will say, there is a helpful website on this subject called COLLEGE CONFIDENTIAL ..... Although it is sometimes full of folks and posts completely obsessed with IVYs.... I'll tell you now just so you know- If you applied Early admission you will get two very nice letters of rejection.

mozzer
02-22-2011, 11:26 AM
I went to look at Lancaster university today, amazing place!

RealityPolice
02-22-2011, 12:09 PM
heard it is pretty generous with financial aid though

That's the nice thing about many of the private liberal-arts schools--lots of financial aid. Just try to limit the loans you need. (I'll be dead before mine are paid off.)

Mansewerz
02-22-2011, 01:39 PM
^ Sorry, gonna have to flag last entry- Politics is verbotten here by decree from the top.

But I will say, there is a helpful website on this subject called COLLEGE CONFIDENTIAL ..... Although it is sometimes full of folks and posts completely obsessed with IVYs.... I'll tell you now just so you know- If you applied Early admission you will get two very nice letters of rejection.

Who're you talking to?

LuckyR
02-22-2011, 03:18 PM
Definitely have fun in college, (I know you will) but keep an eye on the total expenditure since having more and more college grads around does two things, it makes not having a 4 year degree an even bigger negative, but it simultaneously dilutes the value of having one.

Manus Domini
02-22-2011, 05:15 PM
^ Sorry, gonna have to flag last entry- Politics is verbotten here by decree from the top.

But I will say, there is a helpful website on this subject called COLLEGE CONFIDENTIAL ..... Although it is sometimes full of folks and posts completely obsessed with IVYs.... I'll tell you now just so you know- If you applied Early admission you will get two very nice letters of rejection.

That being said, so is advertising and that is what you are doing...

Actually, politics is not contraband, political trolling is. Comments are not against the rules...

What you were doing is, however

Manus Domini
02-22-2011, 05:17 PM
That's the nice thing about many of the private liberal-arts schools--lots of financial aid. Just try to limit the loans you need. (I'll be dead before mine are paid off.)

yeah, that's the problem, ain't it? That's why I have a back-up school that would pay me to go if I get accepted.

Mansewerz
02-22-2011, 06:14 PM
Definitely have fun in college, (I know you will) but keep an eye on the total expenditure since having more and more college grads around does two things, it makes not having a 4 year degree an even bigger negative, but it simultaneously dilutes the value of having one.

I agree. Luckily, the schools i've applied to are giving good financial aid packages, so hopefully they accept me.

yeah, that's the problem, ain't it? That's why I have a back-up school that would pay me to go if I get accepted.

Good to hear you're planning it out!

Manus Domini
02-22-2011, 07:05 PM
Good to hear you're planning it out!

more like parents. I don't wanna go to Alabama for college :(

mhstennis100
02-22-2011, 09:55 PM
I'm a freshman in college now. My decision came down to University of Texas, Texas A&M, and Baylor (with scholarships they were all about the same price). I got accepted into the business school at each university, and I ended up going with A&M. I absolutely love it. If anyone is thinking about A&M I'm happy to answer questions.

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
02-23-2011, 11:13 AM
That being said, so is advertising and that is what you are doing...

Actually, politics is not contraband, political trolling is. Comments are not against the rules...

What you were doing is, however


I was giving out a good resource-a college forum with more information from posters more expert and interested in the subject.

As they say at Faber College-
Knowledge is good
AND
Obtuse and touchy is no way to go thru life

Manus Domini
02-23-2011, 03:41 PM
I was giving out a good resource-a college forum with more information from posters more expert and interested in the subject.

As they say at Faber College-
Knowledge is good
AND
Obtuse and touchy is no way to go thru life

that being said, my post was NOT political trolling as you claimed and yours was far more solicitative than mine was trollatative...

KingF
02-23-2011, 03:52 PM
Virginia Commonwealth University is an upcoming school. Good tennis tradition and uprising business program.
Check this out too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFDAii1q6oM

The Wreck
02-23-2011, 04:08 PM
University of Georgia student here, if anyone has any questions.

neillis
02-23-2011, 08:57 PM
I actually just wrote to Georgia's Classics department. They have an online non-degree seeking audit course in Latin beginning in Latin I and ending in studies of Ovid. I am thinking of doing this route.

Eph
02-25-2011, 07:45 AM
Mansewerz:


My friend is graduating from there this year. It's a really good school, especially compared to Ivy League. The Ivy League schools are 99% bookwork, 1% hands-on work. University of Illinois is 85% bookwork, 15% hands-on work.


What do you mean between "bookwork" and "hands-on work"?

Eph
02-25-2011, 07:46 AM
Right now I plan on going the biology route to set myself up for a Pre-med track. However, I have contemplated economics in case I choose against becoming a doctor or I can't get in. One of my other paths i'm considering is research/becoming a professor.

You, and 80% of the incoming class.

Mansewerz
02-25-2011, 09:50 AM
You, and 80% of the incoming class.

True, but I think that if I work hard, I can make it.

GetBetterer
02-25-2011, 03:56 PM
Eph:

What do you mean between "bookwork" and "hands-on work"?

Experience in the field and studying.

Eph
02-25-2011, 04:31 PM
True, but I think that if I work hard, I can make it.

You're not understanding what I mean.

Mansewerz
02-25-2011, 07:15 PM
You're not understanding what I mean.

What do you mean?

flyinghippos101
02-28-2011, 01:33 PM
I'd like to bump this thread for some great news I just got.

I just checked my portal on the University of Western Ontario and to my surprised found out that I have been offered admission

That's just grand

Mansewerz
02-28-2011, 01:36 PM
Congratulations! Quite a way from Mordor though, no?

Mansewerz
03-26-2011, 01:14 PM
Just a bump. Received acceptance to USC and Northwestern on Thursday!

Eph
03-27-2011, 11:12 PM
You live in California? Go to a UC school, then.

Tennishacker
03-27-2011, 11:19 PM
You live in California? Go to a UC school, then.

Don't go to UCLA, "hordes of Asians!"

Mansewerz
03-27-2011, 11:52 PM
You live in California? Go to a UC school, then.

No, I live in Illinois. i would've chosen UCLA or San Diego, but the public schools don't give out as much financial aid. And as said below, "hordes of asians!" Hhaha, gotta love the UCLA's "bimbo".

Eph
03-28-2011, 09:06 AM
No, I live in Illinois. i would've chosen UCLA or San Diego, but the public schools don't give out as much financial aid. And as said below, "hordes of asians!" Hhaha, gotta love the UCLA's "bimbo".

So, what do you plan on studying? Are you sure on that major, or is it only because "it will help me get into med school"? If the latter, will you reconsider your major, if you decide to drop pre-med? What else would/are you interested in?


What kind of doctor would you like to be, and why? Or do you not know (this is okay)?


This may sound odd... I'm very pleased to hear that you are considering financial aid when picking a university. So many people just go to whichever college they think is best, ignoring the costs,... until they get their first bill for their student loans, 6 months after they graduate. (Hopefully you can fix your interest rate -- I wouldn't get variable, especially given the time... in 4 years, interest rates will most likely be very, very high).

I'm working on a web application that discusses personal finance for the 15-22 year old demographic. I think it's neglected, and hopefully I can help. I plan to roll out phase 1 over the summer. I'm interviewing middle and high school students as they walk through campus to go home after school now... making sure I cover everything :)

Sorry if that was a bit of a derailment from your topic.

Eph
03-28-2011, 09:10 AM
Oh, you could also consider taking a "gap year" and living in California, so you can become a resident, for financial aid purposes. Usually all you need is to have a job for that year, and to have a lease during certain dates (usually August 1, for 365 days) to be considered a resident. Some states do not even require a job. In Vermont, it is *very* difficult to get residency status, because they have no money.

Mansewerz
03-28-2011, 10:22 AM
Oh, you could also consider taking a "gap year" and living in California, so you can become a resident, for financial aid purposes. Usually all you need is to have a job for that year, and to have a lease during certain dates (usually August 1, for 365 days) to be considered a resident. Some states do not even require a job. In Vermont, it is *very* difficult to get residency status, because they have no money.

So, what do you plan on studying? Are you sure on that major, or is it only because "it will help me get into med school"? If the latter, will you reconsider your major, if you decide to drop pre-med? What else would/are you interested in?


What kind of doctor would you like to be, and why? Or do you not know (this is okay)?


This may sound odd... I'm very pleased to hear that you are considering financial aid when picking a university. So many people just go to whichever college they think is best, ignoring the costs,... until they get their first bill for their student loans, 6 months after they graduate. (Hopefully you can fix your interest rate -- I wouldn't get variable, especially given the time... in 4 years, interest rates will most likely be very, very high).

I'm working on a web application that discusses personal finance for the 15-22 year old demographic. I think it's neglected, and hopefully I can help. I plan to roll out phase 1 over the summer. I'm interviewing middle and high school students as they walk through campus to go home after school now... making sure I cover everything :)

Sorry if that was a bit of a derailment from your topic.

No problem. I plan on studying biology as I find it both interesting and it will help with medical school. But, I have also thought about economics, as I have found a new interest in that this year. I will change majors if I choose not to go to medical school or change my interests. However, the good thing about medical school, as you probably know, is that you don't need to be a biology/chemistry/biochem major to go there. An English major can go to med school with the right prereqs.

As of now, I'm thinking of the cardiology route, and quite possibly, a cardiac surgeon. Of the body parts, the heart is quite fascinating, and it would be great to help in very serious issues such as heart disease and whatnot.

And the gap year crossed my mind. I just didn't know how difficult it would be to go to a great university coming off a gap year. Right now, coming out of high school, my scores look good. I'm not sure if it will look worse after a gap year.

It does dishearten me that UCLA is such a great school, in a great neighborhood, and highly ranked, and yet, it's a public school :( But i'll think about the gap year. Thanks for the kind words on financial aid, and thanks again for all of the help!

flyinghippos101
03-28-2011, 10:27 AM
Just a bump. Received acceptance to USC and Northwestern on Thursday!

That's awesome dude :) Have you heard back from all your schools yet?

Mansewerz
03-28-2011, 10:57 AM
That's awesome dude :) Have you heard back from all your schools yet?

Not yet! Still waiting on Harvard, Princeton, Yale, and Duke. Hopefully one of them says yes!

Thanks for the kind words :)

Eph
03-28-2011, 11:49 AM
No problem. I plan on studying biology as I find it both interesting and it will help with medical school. But, I have also thought about economics, as I have found a new interest in that this year. I will change majors if I choose not to go to medical school or change my interests. However, the good thing about medical school, as you probably know, is that you don't need to be a biology/chemistry/biochem major to go there. An English major can go to med school with the right prereqs.

As of now, I'm thinking of the cardiology route, and quite possibly, a cardiac surgeon. Of the body parts, the heart is quite fascinating, and it would be great to help in very serious issues such as heart disease and whatnot.

And the gap year crossed my mind. I just didn't know how difficult it would be to go to a great university coming off a gap year. Right now, coming out of high school, my scores look good. I'm not sure if it will look worse after a gap year.

It does dishearten me that UCLA is such a great school, in a great neighborhood, and highly ranked, and yet, it's a public school :( But i'll think about the gap year. Thanks for the kind words on financial aid, and thanks again for all of the help!

Yeah, that's basically why I mentioned that. When I thought I would study medicine, I was thrilled that I didn't have to study sciences (although I wanted to). I've heard mixed things about whether it helps or not to study the humanities and then go to med school, rather than the typical bio/chem to med school route. Honestly, I think it is best to study what you love: Your passion will shine out where it matters most, i.e. with professors, your research, etc..

My roommate gave up his professorship at UCSD to become a researcher here -- if you want, I could forward any queries to him.


Public schools can be great. SUNY (New York) is another great system. In fact, one of my advisors is on leave this semester doing research at Stony Brook. I have tried to persuade my brother into going to SUNY Stony Brook, but he rather go to a no-name school closer to a ski mountain. Sigh.


For what its worth, I wish I took a gap year. You'll have plenty of time for academics. Travel a bit, spend some time in Lima, volunteering for some organization in the slums there. See how others live. Help out where you can.

Then go to school. You'll appreciate that perspective.

Serve_Ace
03-28-2011, 01:28 PM
Awww no UPark? Depressingg

NaeviusTennis
03-28-2011, 01:49 PM
Yeah, that's basically why I mentioned that. When I thought I would study medicine, I was thrilled that I didn't have to study sciences (although I wanted to). I've heard mixed things about whether it helps or not to study the humanities and then go to med school, rather than the typical bio/chem to med school route. Honestly, I think it is best to study what you love: Your passion will shine out where it matters most, i.e. with professors, your research, etc..

My roommate gave up his professorship at UCSD to become a researcher here -- if you want, I could forward any queries to him.


Public schools can be great. SUNY (New York) is another great system. In fact, one of my advisors is on leave this semester doing research at Stony Brook. I have tried to persuade my brother into going to SUNY Stony Brook, but he rather go to a no-name school closer to a ski mountain. Sigh.


For what its worth, I wish I took a gap year. You'll have plenty of time for academics. Travel a bit, spend some time in Lima, volunteering for some organization in the slums there. See how others live. Help out where you can.

Then go to school. You'll appreciate that perspective.

Definitely don't need to do biology/biochem/molecular bio as a major to be a successful premed. I majored in biochem and molecular bio and minored in English. If I could do it all over again, I would have definitely majored in English and forgotten about biochem.

Regardless, you have to take the prereqs anyways, and Ochem is the same whether you're a biochem major or an English major.

Premed is really not that difficult, I had plenty of time in college and thoroughly enjoyed my time (beer pong 3x/week, frat parties, the whole nine yards)

If at any time you have questions about the premed process, let me know and I can answer anything.

Mansewerz
03-28-2011, 04:04 PM
Yeah, that's basically why I mentioned that. When I thought I would study medicine, I was thrilled that I didn't have to study sciences (although I wanted to). I've heard mixed things about whether it helps or not to study the humanities and then go to med school, rather than the typical bio/chem to med school route. Honestly, I think it is best to study what you love: Your passion will shine out where it matters most, i.e. with professors, your research, etc..

My roommate gave up his professorship at UCSD to become a researcher here -- if you want, I could forward any queries to him.


Public schools can be great. SUNY (New York) is another great system. In fact, one of my advisors is on leave this semester doing research at Stony Brook. I have tried to persuade my brother into going to SUNY Stony Brook, but he rather go to a no-name school closer to a ski mountain. Sigh.


For what its worth, I wish I took a gap year. You'll have plenty of time for academics. Travel a bit, spend some time in Lima, volunteering for some organization in the slums there. See how others live. Help out where you can.

Then go to school. You'll appreciate that perspective.

Thanks for the help. When you say here, what school are you referring to?

Definitely don't need to do biology/biochem/molecular bio as a major to be a successful premed. I majored in biochem and molecular bio and minored in English. If I could do it all over again, I would have definitely majored in English and forgotten about biochem.

Regardless, you have to take the prereqs anyways, and Ochem is the same whether you're a biochem major or an English major.

Premed is really not that difficult, I had plenty of time in college and thoroughly enjoyed my time (beer pong 3x/week, frat parties, the whole nine yards)

If at any time you have questions about the premed process, let me know and I can answer anything.

Thanks I appreciate the help. What school did you go to?

NaeviusTennis
03-28-2011, 04:12 PM
Dartmouth College

dantesinferno18
03-28-2011, 08:29 PM
I will be playin tennis at UW laCrosse, The nice part is I get the in state tuition for being in Minnesota so it's only $7,500 a year!!!!!!!! I got into their business school. But my dad really wants me to go to the university of Minnesota

Mansewerz
03-29-2011, 12:02 AM
Dartmouth College

Wow, that's definitely up there.

I will be playin tennis at UW laCrosse, The nice part is I get the in state tuition for being in Minnesota so it's only $7,500 a year!!!!!!!! I got into their business school. But my dad really wants me to go to the university of Minnesota

I'm not quite understanding it? In state tuition to UW LaCrosse, but you live in MN? Either way, congrats! Hope you enjoy it at LaCrosse.

What makes your dad want you to go to Minnesota?

Eph
03-29-2011, 07:50 AM
Definitely don't need to do biology/biochem/molecular bio as a major to be a successful premed. I majored in biochem and molecular bio and minored in English. If I could do it all over again, I would have definitely majored in English and forgotten about biochem.

What would you have done with the BA in English, if you decided medical school (or another professional school, e.g., law school) wasn't for you?

Eph
03-29-2011, 07:51 AM
Thanks for the help. When you say here, what school are you referring to?

I'm a student at Harvard.

Mansewerz
03-29-2011, 08:20 AM
I'm a student at Harvard.

Wow! I'm still waiting to hear back from them.

NaeviusTennis
03-29-2011, 12:38 PM
What would you have done with the BA in English, if you decided medical school (or another professional school, e.g., law school) wasn't for you?

I probably would have gotten a PhD in English and become a professor at a university IF I decided Medicine wasn't for me. I have no regrets about medicine so far though; we'll see in the future. The things that irk me about medicine are never medicine itself; it's the paperwork, bureaucracy, and broken-system that permeate every aspect of it.

Manus Domini
03-29-2011, 03:44 PM
here's something interesting for ya

http://www.npr.org/2011/03/28/134916924/Amherst-Admissions-Process

gully
03-29-2011, 04:47 PM
I probably would have gotten a PhD in English and become a professor at a university IF I decided Medicine wasn't for me. I have no regrets about medicine so far though; we'll see in the future. The things that irk me about medicine are never medicine itself; it's the paperwork, bureaucracy, and broken-system that permeate every aspect of it.Just a friendly note, from experience: you would have been granted no special dispensation from these evils with a professorship in English! :)

NaeviusTennis
03-29-2011, 05:20 PM
Just a friendly note, from experience: you would have been granted no special dispensation from these evils with a professorship in English! :)

heh, good point.

Eph
03-30-2011, 05:01 AM
Wow! I'm still waiting to hear back from them.

If you are coming for any reason, let me know and I can show you around. It's an extremely large place and there are a lot of tourists. I usually take friends to Widener, to see the Memorial Room (where the Gutenberg Bible rests); I cannot take visitors in the stacks.

Yesterday I realized the tourist craze is going to pick up. It was so beautiful outside and the streets were packed. I wish people would remember that this place is still a learning institution. The best part is... most of the tourists (and almost all of the Chineses ones -- at least the ones that come on the daily bus tour) rub their hands on the statue us grad students **** on once we get their degree.

I guess I should stop complaining, since my office is far enough from the Yard, that I don't have to deal with many tourists. But, well, I'm a grouch! :)


Believe it or not, I do like showing people around (on my terms! not those stupid tour groups).

Eph
03-30-2011, 05:06 AM
I probably would have gotten a PhD in English and become a professor at a university IF I decided Medicine wasn't for me. I have no regrets about medicine so far though; we'll see in the future. The things that irk me about medicine are never medicine itself; it's the paperwork, bureaucracy, and broken-system that permeate every aspect of it.

Hopefully? I mean, few professorships open up each year in English. Probably more than my field, but my old roommates is a Classics PhD candidate and he sometimes mused over the fact of slim job prospects later on. He's primarily interested in Sanskrit, but wants to tie it together somehow with English (I'm not too sure... I'm more of a scientific person and most times I would block out what he was saying and just nod). :) Speaking of which, we are having dinner tonight!


My friend gave up on practicing (oncology) and went to work for Novartis. Though, geographically, he's located in Switzerland, so it is a bit easier for him... He also does medical underwriting for a German insurance underwriter at home/on the site. His spouse, on the other hand, runs her own (ophthalmology) practice (however she still hates practicing... but not for those reasons.. at least). Their biggest choice is decided on a Bentley or Rolls-Royce this year (not kidding). I am very fond of the Swiss medical system!

Mansewerz
03-30-2011, 08:32 AM
If you are coming for any reason, let me know and I can show you around. It's an extremely large place and there are a lot of tourists. I usually take friends to Widener, to see the Memorial Room (where the Gutenberg Bible rests); I cannot take visitors in the stacks.

Yesterday I realized the tourist craze is going to pick up. It was so beautiful outside and the streets were packed. I wish people would remember that this place is still a learning institution. The best part is... most of the tourists (and almost all of the Chineses ones -- at least the ones that come on the daily bus tour) rub their hands on the statue us grad students **** on once we get their degree.

I guess I should stop complaining, since my office is far enough from the Yard, that I don't have to deal with many tourists. But, well, I'm a grouch! :)


Believe it or not, I do like showing people around (on my terms! not those stupid tour groups).

Great, I will let you know should it happen! Thanks!

Mr.Brightside
03-30-2011, 04:26 PM
I'm a junior, and right now my list is looking like

Brown
Davidson
Carnegie Mellon
Columbia
UMich
Wesleyan
Harvey Mudd

and possibly MIT, although there's probably a 0% chance I'd get in. Brown is probably my first choice, though it could change any minute.

Manus Domini
03-30-2011, 05:03 PM
MIT is 0% for everyone, I heard

GetBetterer
03-30-2011, 05:12 PM
Manus_Domini:
MIT is 0% for everyone, I heard

A good friend of mine wanted to go to Harvard but got accepted by MIT. MIT was a disappointment to him, lol.

Mr.Brightside
03-30-2011, 05:14 PM
Manus_Domini:


A good friend of mine wanted to go to Harvard but got accepted by MIT. MIT was a disappointment to him, lol.

I hate people like that.

Manus Domini
03-30-2011, 05:20 PM
Manus_Domini:


A good friend of mine wanted to go to Harvard but got accepted by MIT. MIT was a disappointment to him, lol.

lol have you heard the NPR broadcast I put up a few posts ago about Amherst admissions?

Mansewerz
03-30-2011, 08:55 PM
Ok guys, good and bad news.

The bad: Denied at Harvard, Princeton, and Stanford (stanford happened months ago, the other two just today).

Lukewarm: Waitlisted at Yale!

The good/awesome: Accepted at Duke!!!!!!

I've already been accepted to USC, Northwestern, and U of I, but Duke really made my day (waitlisted at Wash U, meh). So excited!

Thanks to everyone for the advice throughout this thread!

RealityPolice
03-30-2011, 09:25 PM
I'm a junior, and right now my list is looking like

Brown
Davidson
Carnegie Mellon
Columbia
UMich
Wesleyan
Harvey Mudd

and possibly MIT, although there's probably a 0% chance I'd get in. Brown is probably my first choice, though it could change any minute.

CMU is a top-notch school, with great programs in computer-oriented fields (my brother was an AI major there back when AI was still in its infancy), business, law, and the arts. I wouldn't consider it to be a step down from any of the better-known schools.

Yenster
03-31-2011, 12:31 AM
I'm a junior right now. I have a 4.17 weighted GPA and a 3.66 non-weighted GPA, and I got around ~1800 on my SATs. I play varsity tennis for going to be three years (co-captain), level 9 piano, played all-Star baseball for a year in high school, and I do a lot volunteer work. I'm also asian :/
Can someone inform me of my chances for getting into the following schools?
UC San Diego, UC Irvine, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Pepperdine University, Occidental University, Pitzer College, Claremont Colleges, or anything in California? Thanks :)

Yenster
03-31-2011, 12:32 AM
Probably undecided for my major and i'm in the top 8% in my school

Yenster
03-31-2011, 12:32 AM
Also Mansewerz, do you mind posting your GPA, extracurriculars, etc.?

Eph
03-31-2011, 01:20 PM
The bad: Denied at Harvard

It's okay, the undergrads at Harvard, in my experience are extremely lazy (not necessarily w.r.t. academics - I won't comment there) and pretentious.

Congrats on making a choice to go to Duke. Not going to a HYPS (or whatever it is called these days, HYPSCPC, blah blah) school isn't the end of the world.

Spend time getting to know professors, go to their office hours, read about their research and try to help out where you can. That's the key to a good undergraduate education (and learning to moderate the "freedom", so you can have fun, but also work).

Now relax... you deserve it.

Mansewerz
03-31-2011, 01:32 PM
Also Mansewerz, do you mind posting your GPA, extracurriculars, etc.?

Sure, no problem.

GPA: 5.87 or so, should go up this semester hopefully.
ACT (I know you didn't ask, but I'll post it for reference): 35
SAT: N/a (didn't take, I prefer the ACT format anyways)
Extracurriculars:
-Varsity Tennis (4 years of tennis, 3 on varsity)
-Newspaper (4 years: Staff writer/designer, Design Editor, Health Editor, Sports Editor were/are my roles throughout the four years, but not all at once of course)
-Model UN (Just senior year, I wish I had done it earlier)
-NHS (Vice President)
-At Home Stringing Business (courtesy of TTW :))
-Mu Alpha Theta (Vice President)
-French Honor Society (Like a nitwit, I forgot to put this on my applications)
-Work Experience as a racquet stringer at a club for 9 months.

That's the basic gist of my apps. If you have any more questions, let me know. I can get into more specifics and whatnot.

It's okay, the undergrads at Harvard, in my experience are extremely lazy (not necessarily w.r.t. academics - I won't comment there) and pretentious.

Congrats on making a choice to go to Duke. Not going to a HYPS (or whatever it is called these days, HYPSCPC, blah blah) school isn't the end of the world.

Spend time getting to know professors, go to their office hours, read about their research and try to help out where you can. That's the key to a good undergraduate education (and learning to moderate the "freedom", so you can have fun, but also work).

Now relax... you deserve it.

Thanks, I appreciate it. Not too bummed. I was hoping to leave Illinois and go to a top tier school, and Duke is up there. I'll definitely take your advice and get to know my professors and whatnot.

The Wreck
03-31-2011, 03:17 PM
You live in Illinois and didn't want to go to the University of Chicago?!? Gah, what's up with that?

You've gotten into some great school, so don't worry about the ones you didn't. I think where you go for undergrad is pretty overrated anyway. I considered all the Ivy's and Duke and what not, but when it came down to it, getting a free education for undergrad (UGA) and then moving on to a higher profile school for grad work, if I choose to do so, made more sense.

You're clearly a bright kid, so college will probably be pretty easy for you wherever you go, as long as you're focused/dedicated.

Mansewerz
03-31-2011, 03:36 PM
You live in Illinois and didn't want to go to the University of Chicago?!? Gah, what's up with that?

You've gotten into some great school, so don't worry about the ones you didn't. I think where you go for undergrad is pretty overrated anyway. I considered all the Ivy's and Duke and what not, but when it came down to it, getting a free education for undergrad (UGA) and then moving on to a higher profile school for grad work, if I choose to do so, made more sense.

You're clearly a bright kid, so college will probably be pretty easy for you wherever you go, as long as you're focused/dedicated.

Thanks, I appreciate it. I hope to stay focused and dedicated in college, but it may be tough! :)

And one of my big reasons for the Ivy's/Duke/NU, etc had to do with financial aid. In my situation, it made more sense to go to one of those schools.

And re: U of C, I feel that U of C isn't for me. It's pretty intense, not as much fun (as the saying goes), and I want to have a good time at my undergrad school. Plus, i'd like to leave Illinois.

Eph
03-31-2011, 05:01 PM
(I was writing this as an addendum to my other post, however, I just spent an hour on the phone and then I was locked out of my house (with no phone, computer, eyeglasses, etc etc and finally, after a long session with a hammer, against wood and steel, I won and am back in my house). I saw you updated the thread. I wanted to make sure you -- and others -- read this.)


Don't get caught up in the inane first year ******** most schools spew. Focus on meeting faculty. This is most important: Never ever feel intimidated to approach faculty[/b]. By definition, they are teachers, educators... people you learn from. I have only met two professors who had no interest in talking with me during my entire school experience (I've been around for awhile... I started college when I was 16, spent time at various schools and I'm finishing my PhD now).

I know professors can seem intimidated and they are very, very busy people, but (most) do care about teaching. If they did not care about teaching, they would have chose a research position, not a professorship, which includes a teaching competent.

If your first email goes unanswered, do not be afraid to email again: Sometimes a professor is away for the weekend at a conference, at a retreat (of all sorts, not just religiously based), or even sabbatical. You may or may not get an auto-reply in these circumstances (or others I have not mentioned), a lot of professors are forgetful, especially when it comes to technology. Perhaps your first email ended in their SPAM inbox (it happens all the time!) and they never saw it. Or too much email piled up in their inbox(for whatever reason) and they filtered emails from new contacts to another folder that is meant to be dealt with at a later point (and rarely gets dealt with).

Do not be afraid to make yourself known. Hell, after all, you are paying for your education (and for them to be there). If you can't make scheduled office hours (for whatever reason), email the professor and set up a time (make sure you are there 5 minutes early) and be prepared to wait.

A story: One professor I know tells students that when they come to scheduled office hours (2 hour session once a week) to "bring a book [...] I will stay as long as students want to see me, but be prepared to wait a long time". He regularly stays past 10pm (his weekly office hour is usually from 2-4).

N.B. This advice applies for faculty/researchers at other institutions as well, iff you have good reason to contact them (e.g. your research leads you to one of their papers and you have a question, concern or are interested in collaboration). This shouldn't be an issue in your first year (probably not until thesis time, but possibly earlier).


Finally, do not be afraid to contact professors you aren't taking courses with (or outside of your department). The aforementioned rules apply.





I know I went on and on and on but a lot of students are intimidated to approach professors and they lose out. My fiancée was one of them. There is no reason to be.

Also, if you ever have any personal problems and it is affecting your work in a specific class, go speak to your professor as soon as possible (skip the TF/TA/whatever). Most likely they will listen and try to help you in your situation, as best they can. Some will even lie to the Registrar's Office/administrators, if they feel like it.

Here's a fairly common example: If grades are due to the Registrar's Office from professors on a certain date and you haven't turned in a portion of the work for a valid reason, viz. death in the family, new mental or physical illness, a chronic illness that took an unexpected turn, etc, a professor and you may reach an agreement for you to agree on a timetable for a guaranteed grade assigned in advance. S/he can never change that grade, whatever s/he decided, and if the administration found out s/he assigned a permanent grade, affirming you earned that grade based on the requirements locked into place with the Registrar's Office, the professor would have a headache to deal with. And if you didn't follow the timeline and the rules established with the professor, I would recommend transferring. :) You'll learn rather quickly that professors do not always enjoy the administrator's that run the school (you'll see the bureaucracy at work almost immediately).

But if the professor does not know you, it's harder for them to help you (in any way). So, get to know your professors (and other professors of interest) as soon as possible. In sum, do not be nervous.

Hope this helps.


N.B. I read a lot about professors who are not available to students from various sources, everything from college newspaper op-eds (complaining), to "experts"(********ting), to the national media (tiring). and worst, posts on various websites regarding college from kids or parents (uninformed). Supposedly this is rampant at Harvard (and other places I have studied). Utter ********. Just set up a meeting. I've personally seen faculty talk to students for hours about switching majors into the professor's field but the student has various questions (from personal, to academic to careers/plans afterwards, etc..) I once asked said professor why he would do this (I was pretty shocked, to be frank) and he said "If I can spend an hour or so talking with someone to help them learn physics or to help them figure out where they are going in life, why not? I have plenty of hours for that." Great attitude, I thought, and I try to follow the same principle.

flyinghippos101
03-31-2011, 05:21 PM
^^^^

Very informative, thank you. An excellent contribution to this thread.

I hope you don't mind me asking, but most of my uni choices have a pretty massive undergraduate attendance and I've been told undergrad classes can have up to hundreds of students. I'm not too sure how big classes at Harvard are, but with a prof having to deal with hundreds of kids, with maybe a solid percentage with just as many questions as you, are setting up meetings with prof usually hit or miss?

The Wreck
03-31-2011, 06:10 PM
^^^^

Very informative, thank you. An excellent contribution to this thread.

I hope you don't mind me asking, but most of my uni choices have a pretty massive undergraduate attendance and I've been told undergrad classes can have up to hundreds of students. I'm not too sure how big classes at Harvard are, but with a prof having to deal with hundreds of kids, with maybe a solid percentage with just as many questions as you, are setting up meetings with prof usually hit or miss?

In a class that big you will likely have multiple Teaching Assistants that you can meet with. And in my experiences, they are the ones grading all your assignments anyway.

That's not to say you can't meet with professors and things like that, but in massive classes (which are usually bland required courses anyway) it's usually not worth it. When you get into major specific things with smaller classes, go talk to your professors all the time. You're gonna be glad they all know you and can help you at some point.

Mansewerz
03-31-2011, 06:18 PM
(I was writing this as an addendum to my other post, however, I just spent an hour on the phone and then I was locked out of my house (with no phone, computer, eyeglasses, etc etc and finally, after a long session with a hammer, against wood and steel, I won and am back in my house). I saw you updated the thread. I wanted to make sure you -- and others -- read this.)


Don't get caught up in the inane first year ******** most schools spew. Focus on meeting faculty. This is most important: Never ever feel intimidated to approach faculty[/b]. By definition, they are teachers, educators... people you learn from. I have only met two professors who had no interest in talking with me during my entire school experience (I've been around for awhile... I started college when I was 16, spent time at various schools and I'm finishing my PhD now).

I know professors can seem intimidated and they are very, very busy people, but (most) do care about teaching. If they did not care about teaching, they would have chose a research position, not a professorship, which includes a teaching competent.

If your first email goes unanswered, do not be afraid to email again: Sometimes a professor is away for the weekend at a conference, at a retreat (of all sorts, not just religiously based), or even sabbatical. You may or may not get an auto-reply in these circumstances (or others I have not mentioned), a lot of professors are forgetful, especially when it comes to technology. Perhaps your first email ended in their SPAM inbox (it happens all the time!) and they never saw it. Or too much email piled up in their inbox(for whatever reason) and they filtered emails from new contacts to another folder that is meant to be dealt with at a later point (and rarely gets dealt with).

Do not be afraid to make yourself known. Hell, after all, you are paying for your education (and for them to be there). If you can't make scheduled office hours (for whatever reason), email the professor and set up a time (make sure you are there 5 minutes early) and be prepared to wait.

A story: One professor I know tells students that when they come to scheduled office hours (2 hour session once a week) to "bring a book [...] I will stay as long as students want to see me, but be prepared to wait a long time". He regularly stays past 10pm (his weekly office hour is usually from 2-4).

N.B. This advice applies for faculty/researchers at other institutions as well, iff you have good reason to contact them (e.g. your research leads you to one of their papers and you have a question, concern or are interested in collaboration). This shouldn't be an issue in your first year (probably not until thesis time, but possibly earlier).


Finally, do not be afraid to contact professors you aren't taking courses with (or outside of your department). The aforementioned rules apply.





I know I went on and on and on but a lot of students are intimidated to approach professors and they lose out. My fiancée was one of them. There is no reason to be.

Also, if you ever have any personal problems and it is affecting your work in a specific class, go speak to your professor as soon as possible (skip the TF/TA/whatever). Most likely they will listen and try to help you in your situation, as best they can. Some will even lie to the Registrar's Office/administrators, if they feel like it.

Here's a fairly common example: If grades are due to the Registrar's Office from professors on a certain date and you haven't turned in a portion of the work for a valid reason, viz. death in the family, new mental or physical illness, a chronic illness that took an unexpected turn, etc, a professor and you may reach an agreement for you to agree on a timetable for a guaranteed grade assigned in advance. S/he can never change that grade, whatever s/he decided, and if the administration found out s/he assigned a permanent grade, affirming you earned that grade based on the requirements locked into place with the Registrar's Office, the professor would have a headache to deal with. And if you didn't follow the timeline and the rules established with the professor, I would recommend transferring. :) You'll learn rather quickly that professors do not always enjoy the administrator's that run the school (you'll see the bureaucracy at work almost immediately).

But if the professor does not know you, it's harder for them to help you (in any way). So, get to know your professors (and other professors of interest) as soon as possible. In sum, do not be nervous.

Hope this helps.


N.B. I read a lot about professors who are not available to students from various sources, everything from college newspaper op-eds (complaining), to "experts"(********ting), to the national media (tiring). and worst, posts on various websites regarding college from kids or parents (uninformed). Supposedly this is rampant at Harvard (and other places I have studied). Utter ********. Just set up a meeting. I've personally seen faculty talk to students for hours about switching majors into the professor's field but the student has various questions (from personal, to academic to careers/plans afterwards, etc..) I once asked said professor why he would do this (I was pretty shocked, to be frank) and he said "If I can spend an hour or so talking with someone to help them learn physics or to help them figure out where they are going in life, why not? I have plenty of hours for that." Great attitude, I thought, and I try to follow the same principle.

Wow, 5 star post there! Definitely helps. Once again, thank you!

NaeviusTennis
03-31-2011, 06:28 PM
Duke is great, congrats

Mansewerz
03-31-2011, 06:37 PM
Duke is great, congrats

Thanks! Part of me still wants to go to USC because it's in LA and Durham is much smaller. I've heard Durham isn't much of a "college" town. But, Duke is a better school and I've heard that i'll be spending most of my time at school anyways, so the surrounding area isn't too big of a deal. That's what i've heard from people that go to school in the Chicago, which is an hour or so from me.

niff
04-01-2011, 02:12 AM
Deciding what to do afterwards is daunting. Next year will be my final year of a masters in chemistry.. really need to generate some ideas in summer! I could study further, but I'm so at the stage where I would like a job outside of researh.

tennisnoob3
04-02-2011, 11:10 AM
I'm a junior right now. I have a 4.17 weighted GPA and a 3.66 non-weighted GPA, and I got around ~1800 on my SATs. I play varsity tennis for going to be three years (co-captain), level 9 piano, played all-Star baseball for a year in high school, and I do a lot volunteer work. I'm also asian :/
Can someone inform me of my chances for getting into the following schools?
UC San Diego, UC Irvine, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Pepperdine University, Occidental University, Pitzer College, Claremont Colleges, or anything in California? Thanks :)

no shot at berkeley, pomona, claremont mckenna. ucla looks like slim chance, too. your sat is very low for most of the schools above. the others ones seem fine though

edit: public schools are mostly gpa and sat based and put little weight on volunteer work, etc.

Mansewerz
04-02-2011, 11:36 AM
no shot at berkeley, pomona, claremont mckenna. ucla looks like slim chance, too. your sat is very low for most of the schools above. the others ones seem fine though

edit: public schools are mostly gpa and sat based and put little weight on volunteer work, etc.

Not sure how right tennisnoob3 is as I don't know a whole lot about those schools. But, check this site out: cappex.com

It gives a kind of chart to somewhat judge your chances of getting into a particular school. And if the chance is there, why not try? Then again, apps do cost a good deal of money, ranging in prices from $50 to $90.

tennisnoob3
04-02-2011, 11:52 AM
Not sure how right tennisnoob3 is as I don't know a whole lot about those schools. But, check this site out: cappex.com

It gives a kind of chart to somewhat judge your chances of getting into a particular school. And if the chance is there, why not try? Then again, apps do cost a good deal of money, ranging in prices from $50 to $90.

LOL? do they charge you for that?

just look at sat/act scores. you want to be above the 50%(percentile) and preferably in the 75% when given. (collegeboard gives 50% and i think the us news book gives you 25/75 percentiles)

it varies a bit for each school as some "schools" within a university are harder to get into. generally nursing and education schools are easier to get into

Mansewerz
04-02-2011, 03:00 PM
LOL? do they charge you for that?

just look at sat/act scores. you want to be above the 50%(percentile) and preferably in the 75% when given. (collegeboard gives 50% and i think the us news book gives you 25/75 percentiles)

it varies a bit for each school as some "schools" within a university are harder to get into. generally nursing and education schools are easier to get into

Haha yup, unless you can demonstrate financial need, in which case you receive a waiver. Good advice btw on the ACT/SAT scores.

Also, take into consideration the school's requirements, if they demand ACT/SAT. If you're better at one and not the other, report that score.

Mr.Brightside
04-03-2011, 08:33 PM
So I got my first SAT scores back, which wasn't bad. 2160, without preparing at all. I think I'm gonna study a bit and take it again, and I'm also taking an ACT prep course cause I got a 34 on a practice ACT. We'll see how it goes.

Mansewerz
04-03-2011, 08:42 PM
Junior then? Congrats on the 34, it's a solid score and good enough for anywhere. I personally liked the ACT better.

Mr.Brightside
04-03-2011, 09:17 PM
Yep, junior. But it was a practice ACT. I hope I do that well on the real test.

Eph
04-08-2011, 06:54 PM
^^^^

Very informative, thank you. An excellent contribution to this thread.

I hope you don't mind me asking, but most of my uni choices have a pretty massive undergraduate attendance and I've been told undergrad classes can have up to hundreds of students. I'm not too sure how big classes at Harvard are, but with a prof having to deal with hundreds of kids, with maybe a solid percentage with just as many questions as you, are setting up meetings with prof usually hit or miss?

Sorry for taking so long to reply. What a crazy 8 days it has been!

Some classes are above 200 students, but those are *VERY* rare. There was one course last semester, I think it was the largest class ever (around 400). It was called "The Physics of Cooking" or some ******** like that (every few years some similar course comes up. It's insulting-- and I guess a bit ironic, since the people who should be most insulted are the students this class is marketed to.)

The usual largest courses (that I am aware of) is CS50 and Justice (moral reasoning/government course). You can read about both both (watching all lectures and syllabi at cs50.net and justiceharvard.org, respectively).


To your question: Both these professors are available to students. For the work in their class, you would go to the assigned TF/TA/whatever. If you wanted to speak with them about work in their course, you're welcomed to, but it may not be ideal. If you wanted to speak to them about their research, from "what should I study on my own so I could help in XYZ capacity?" to "I am interested in working with you on research project ABC", they are available.

Example: Prof. Malan recently sent out a job posting to a list at Harvard for CS concentrators (and/or people interested in computer science), trying to find people to work with on a new startup he founded.


In sum:


I think the general wisdom is "In your first year courses with 100+ students, do not bother with talking to your professors."

While I may not agree with how this wisdom is presented, I understand what they mean.

I would phrase the above, "In large first year courses, you will get more help with your coursework from assigned TAs than the professor. You should talk with the professor if you are interested in material that goes beyond the elementary principles discussed in lecture".


This isn't elitism: "beyond the elementary principles discussed in lecture" could mean "I found topic A interesting, can it relate to [something I read in XYZ publication] or topic Z?" and/or "After this course, what would you recommend I pursue in this field?" and/or "I find this subject very interesting and I was wondering if I can help out in any way?" and/or "I thought I was going to study X major but I find this material very interesting. Could you talk with me about studying this material in more depth?" etc etc...


I hope that helps.

flyinghippos101
04-29-2011, 08:27 PM
Thanks for the excellent response. Sorry for the late reply, have been catching up on final uni decisions and scholarships. I got accepted into all my schools except McGill and decided on going to Dalhousie. I only really applied to McGill to see if I would get accepted and it would take an admission for me to really consider the idea of going to McGill (I'm pretty poor) but the past couple months dealing with McGill have been horrible.

The username and password I was suppose to be assigned for their portal was given to me two weeks after submitting my app (was suppose to receive it immediately afterwards...) They lost my first transcript I mailed to them after being informed that they had it but then mysteriously "disappeared" days later; took another week to get another transcript to them. My self reported grades weren't received and processed for two weeks as I found out later which screwed me out of early-admission consideration. The final kicker was that they denied me on the grounds that I didn't fulfill the bare minimum grade requirements of my program... (I had a 91 average)

I shouldn't have to call McGill so many times the last few months nor do I feel I should call them now, just not worth the trouble.

Eph
05-23-2011, 06:07 PM
Thanks for the excellent response. Sorry for the late reply, have been catching up on final uni decisions and scholarships. I got accepted into all my schools except McGill and decided on going to Dalhousie. I only really applied to McGill to see if I would get accepted and it would take an admission for me to really consider the idea of going to McGill (I'm pretty poor) but the past couple months dealing with McGill have been horrible.

The username and password I was suppose to be assigned for their portal was given to me two weeks after submitting my app (was suppose to receive it immediately afterwards...) They lost my first transcript I mailed to them after being informed that they had it but then mysteriously "disappeared" days later; took another week to get another transcript to them. My self reported grades weren't received and processed for two weeks as I found out later which screwed me out of early-admission consideration. The final kicker was that they denied me on the grounds that I didn't fulfill the bare minimum grade requirements of my program... (I had a 91 average)

I shouldn't have to call McGill so many times the last few months nor do I feel I should call them now, just not worth the trouble.

Well, at least you know where you're going and you can take a breather for a bit.

College is suppose to be fun. It is usually very tiring. Administrative ******** runs rampant. Welcome!

meowmix
05-23-2011, 06:48 PM
If anybody here is looking at Dartmouth, send me a pm. I'm a current 14, and I'd be happy to answer any of your questions.

TonLars
06-16-2011, 03:22 PM
Dantesinferno18 I saw the Mccoy thread you started got shut down. I posted as the 3rd reply to the thread and saw nothing after, what happened? You can email me if you like, thanks!