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View Full Version : Best quality racquets made in China


Best99
02-25-2011, 08:32 PM
In your opinion, which is/are the best quality racquets made in China?

kiteboard
02-26-2011, 10:17 AM
h22 and stock k blade 98

Cooper_Tecnifibre4
02-26-2011, 05:37 PM
h22 and stock k blade 98

I hope you are joking.

That thing chips like crazy. Soon I will have a white PJ.

vsbabolat
02-26-2011, 05:52 PM
In your opinion, which is/are the best quality racquets made in China?

Volkl
HEAD
Dunlop
Pro Kennex
Donnay
Fischer/Pacific

The above list is what I think is a cut above. But really they are all very good. Some have required their OEM to have tighter tollerence than other brands and have little higher quality paint finishes. But there really is no bad name brand racquet out there.

Rock Strongo
02-26-2011, 06:25 PM
Volkl
HEAD
Dunlop
Pro Kennex
Donnay
Fischer/Pacific

The above list is what I think is a cut above. But really they are all very good. Some have required their OEM to have tighter tollerence than other brands and have little higher quality paint finishes. But there really is no bad name brand racquet out there.

Let me just say, you forgot the mother of quality, Wilson!:grin:

Best99
02-26-2011, 07:50 PM
Volkl
HEAD
Dunlop
Pro Kennex
Donnay
Fischer/Pacific

The above list is what I think is a cut above. But really they are all very good. Some have required their OEM to have tighter tollerence than other brands and have little higher quality paint finishes. But there really is no bad name brand racquet out there.

I wasn't asking about brands, but about specific racquets. I honestly think nowadays we can't get quality sticks like we could some years/decades before, when the Classic 600 or the PS were at their prime...
That's my opinion, but I may be wrong. I personally play with a K 6.1 Tour 90 and think that's in a certain way a ''good quality'' racquet. Are there REALLY good quality racquets in the current mortals market? Pros can get almost whatever they want, but what about the Average Joe that buys a $200 stick in his regular tennis shop? Will he get the same quality as some years before?

Nextman916
02-26-2011, 08:04 PM
In my experience dunlop has always kept their sticks closest to spec.

jwbarrientos
02-27-2011, 03:58 AM
Quality means... match to specs? paint quality? keeping its shape?

Pioneer
02-27-2011, 04:42 AM
There are no good quality racquets. Even pro stock K Blade Tours chip like crazy

Best99
02-27-2011, 04:45 PM
Quality means... match to specs? paint quality? keeping its shape?


Let's say that a ''good quality'' racquet is the one who is close to its specs. Appart from that, I'd also take into account how good the quality control is, meaning how much do 2 racquets of the same model differ.

Best99
02-27-2011, 04:46 PM
There are no good quality racquets. Even pro stock K Blade Tours chip like crazy

Cannot agree on this one. I've got 2 K 6.1 90s and they have exactly the same balance and weight, and play identically (meaning they play awsome).

snoflewis
02-27-2011, 05:20 PM
just because the two you got doesnt mean that wilson's QC is good. they probably have the worst consistency in terms of specs throughout a batch of rackets. you got lucky there.

Buckethead
02-27-2011, 05:46 PM
Volkl
HEAD
Dunlop
Pro Kennex
Donnay
Fischer/Pacific

The above list is what I think is a cut above. But really they are all very good. Some have required their OEM to have tighter tollerence than other brands and have little higher quality paint finishes. But there really is no bad name brand racquet out there.
Would you mind sharing why Pro Kennex and HEAD(retail??) are ahead of Pacific in your list?
What about Tecnifibre??

rodrigoamaral
02-27-2011, 05:50 PM
Head and Volkl

brooker
02-27-2011, 06:45 PM
Volkl
HEAD
Dunlop
Pro Kennex
Donnay
Fischer/Pacific

The above list is what I think is a cut above. But really they are all very good. Some have required their OEM to have tighter tollerence than other brands and have little higher quality paint finishes. But there really is no bad name brand racquet out there.

The main product lines of Pro Kennex, such as the KI series, are made in Taiwan.

vsbabolat
02-27-2011, 06:58 PM
The main product lines of Pro Kennex, such as the KI series, are made in Taiwan.

The Redondos and Ki Series I have seen are all Made in China.
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w50/vsbabolat/Pro_Kennex_Made_InChina.jpg
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w50/vsbabolat/Pro_Kennex_Made_InChina_2.jpg

Pro Kennex was once Made in Taiwan but not since the early 90's.

StanW
02-27-2011, 07:00 PM
The sad thing about getting a racquet from China is that it can chip so easily.
*Sigh*
Even swinging in the air will lead to giant white mark on your racquet somewhere. :(

To be honest, if you had the money and the molds for a racquet, you could probably statistically make a better racquet then from China.

And all of this is coming from a Chinese guy.

adidasman
02-28-2011, 11:43 AM
The sad thing about getting a racquet from China is that it can chip so easily.
*Sigh*
Even swinging in the air will lead to giant white mark on your racquet somewhere. :(

To be honest, if you had the money and the molds for a racquet, you could probably statistically make a better racquet then from China.

And all of this is coming from a Chinese guy. I can tell you that the finish on my adidas Barricades - made in China - is as good, if not better, than any frame I've ever owned. Very durable, beautifully applied, and they still look great after two years plus of hard playing. Very few chips in (or even marks on) the paint, and those that are there are in heavy-wear areas. Keentech made them, for whatever that means. My old Kneissl Toms Machines were good in that regard, too, but not as good as the Barricades. Too bad nobody bought the bloody thing... :(

Tennis Dunce
02-28-2011, 11:47 AM
my mg prestige mid looks great still.

StanW
02-28-2011, 12:48 PM
haha maybe it was a 1 in a million freak accident or something. :P

SystemicAnomaly
02-28-2011, 11:52 PM
Ya telling that there are currently racquets not made in China!!!

MethodTennis
03-01-2011, 03:02 AM
Racquets made out of china! Obviously they are gonna break if you play with them!

Seriously though I think that the quality of racquets out of china is pretty good in general. Just because its china doesnt make it worse however I think that the paint is absolutly terrible but the rackets are structurally sound and I dont see why they would be closer to spec anywhere else in the world?

Best99
03-01-2011, 09:28 AM
Racquets made out of china! Obviously they are gonna break if you play with them!

Seriously though I think that the quality of racquets out of china is pretty good in general. Just because its china doesnt make it worse however I think that the paint is absolutly terrible but the rackets are structurally sound and I dont see why they would be closer to spec anywhere else in the world?

If I pay $200 for a ''player's frame'' I'd like to get great quality on what I buy. Someone here said that I was lucky because I came across 2 K 6.1 90 that had exactly the same balance and weight, so I assume the quality control here is not that great (I already knew some sticks had this ''problem'').

Appart from that, IF the quality is not that bad, why don't generally speaking pros play with ''Made in China'' frames? Appart from Federer who seems to play with a retail version of the K90 I am not concerned of any other pro who plays with a retail version of the racquet he calls to use. Is that a consequence of the preference of the player because he loves playing, let's say, with a made in Austria PT57? As far as I know many of the top pros are playing with that stick. So, why can't we get the same quality racquets of the pros? Someone would say they'd cost a fortune. Anyway, I think more than one here in this forum would pay (let's suppose) $400 for exactly the base racquet a pro uses (base racquet meaning without customization).

vsbabolat
03-01-2011, 09:31 AM
Ya telling that there are currently racquets not made in China!!!

Yonex still manufactures their premium racquets in Japan.

Best99
03-01-2011, 10:13 AM
Isn't Yonex the only one who manufactureres outisde China?

rdis10093
03-01-2011, 11:28 AM
forget china, Yonex in Japan all the way

Pioneer
03-01-2011, 11:42 AM
Basically all the small non-American companies have high-quality paintjobs and tighter QC - Volkl, Dunlop, etc.

Babolat, Head and Wilson are the worst quality but the best playing characteristics so it's a trade-off

Best99
03-01-2011, 06:15 PM
Basically all the small non-American companies have high-quality paintjobs and tighter QC - Volkl, Dunlop, etc.

Babolat, Head and Wilson are the worst quality but the best playing characteristics so it's a trade-off


How can a bad quality product perform well?

Nextman916
03-02-2011, 02:08 PM
Basically all the small non-American companies have high-quality paintjobs and tighter QC - Volkl, Dunlop, etc.

Babolat, Head and Wilson are the worst quality but the best playing characteristics so it's a trade-off

head and babolat aren't american

Timbo's hopeless slice
03-02-2011, 02:41 PM
I have been blown away by the Dunlops I have just started using (china made)

There are a LOT of tennis players in our house, and the weakest is an 11 year old with a national singles ranking in 12s, so there are plenty of people to playtest anything that comes into the house.

Now, we almost all play with HEADs, my (4.0) wife has some MG Instincts, The 17 year old and the 15 year old play with YT Extremes and, until last week, I had Speed MPs. (The munchkin has a couple of lightweight (260g) Volkl Tours)

Ok, so, observations. All the heads have poor quality paint and there is a fair bit of spec variation. This is particularly the case with the Extremes, of which we have 6, none of which weigh the same! Katie's Instincts are probably the pick of the bunch to play with, nice racquets. My Speeds were pretty well made but the frame turned out to be a little heavy and a little harsh for my decrepit arms to cope with, so I moved on..to Dunlop!
Ok, here's the thing, my Bio300s are sensational. It isn't just that they are a beautiful frame to hit with, with no vibration (I didn't realise how much the HEADs all vibrate til now) and a lovely feel, but the quality control is amazing. They are all the same!
So, just my $0.02, but coming from a family full of players who all say the same thing. In fact, I fear the 'Dad, I think I would play better with new racquets' conversations are not far away!

(I should be pretty safe, though, just on the peer pressure factor. All their squad mates play with either HEAD or Babolat, adn they are teenagers...)

(Wilson don't have a huge presence around here, for some reason, you see a few older pro staffs, but not many of the newer frames for some reason)_

Best99
03-03-2011, 06:58 PM
So you agree on the fact that Head rackuets have a low standarized QC but that they play well anyway?

Timbo's hopeless slice
03-03-2011, 07:01 PM
well, only kind of. I find them a bit harsh and tinny compared to either Liam's (the 11 year old) Volkls or my Dunlops.

Lots of vibration.

I haven't really had much to do with Babolat or Prince, so I can't compare them.

Best99
03-04-2011, 11:25 AM
I've gathered some useful information today.

I just went to my regular tennis shop, as I am used to, but since I had some free time I decided to spend it talking to the owner of the shop, who I knew since a long time ago and is kinda a friend of my.

I talked to him about this, and he told me one very interesting fact.

If you take a look at the composition of a certain racket, let's say a Youtek Prestige, you may read something like graphite + d3o or something similar. Furthermore, if you look for the composition of a Aeropro Drive, you may come across to a "100 % HMG", wright?

Well, not in fact. That's in some ways wrong.

He told me that every brand who provides rackets for them sends them a list with the REAL composition of the rackets, and the percentage of carbon they had. To my surprise, some of them had only a 60 % of graphite (I think it was a Babolat Extra Sweetspot). I was told that there's no racket with a REAL construction of 100 % graphite, just because in the mortals market there isn't such thing. And, luckily, he also pointed out the fact that my K 6.1 90 was one of the rackets with the highest % of carbon on its construction. Maybe that can explain the differences in what has to do with the quality construction of the rackets. How does that sound?

TheRed
03-04-2011, 11:52 AM
Here we go with this crap again. Pros play with Austrian frames, in part, because the factories in China are set up to produce mass numbers of racquet of a different composition. They aren't really set up to produce a few thousand of a different spec for the pro players. Ultimately, we don't know all the reasons why Head is producing frames in Austria for the pros.

As for actual quality, just look at the spec variations of Fischer racquets, Kneissl, and Wilson racquets. All are made in China BUT, the first two have great quality control. the Kneissl even has the old school feel with the kevlar tendons. The difference if you haven't figured it out yet is the company (or their requirements), not where the racquet is made. Why don't you take two Head Radicals from the 90's and see how close to spec they are. I bet it won't be better than the current China frames. I agree that the old racquets felt better. But that has to do with the composition and design of the frame, a decision made by Wilson/Head/Prince, not a consequence of Chinese production.

If I pay $200 for a ''player's frame'' I'd like to get great quality on what I buy. Someone here said that I was lucky because I came across 2 K 6.1 90 that had exactly the same balance and weight, so I assume the quality control here is not that great (I already knew some sticks had this ''problem'').

Appart from that, IF the quality is not that bad, why don't generally speaking pros play with ''Made in China'' frames? Appart from Federer who seems to play with a retail version of the K90 I am not concerned of any other pro who plays with a retail version of the racquet he calls to use. Is that a consequence of the preference of the player because he loves playing, let's say, with a made in Austria PT57? As far as I know many of the top pros are playing with that stick. So, why can't we get the same quality racquets of the pros? Someone would say they'd cost a fortune. Anyway, I think more than one here in this forum would pay (let's suppose) $400 for exactly the base racquet a pro uses (base racquet meaning without customization).

mtommer
03-04-2011, 02:25 PM
Ok, here's the thing, my Bio300s are sensational. It isn't just that they are a beautiful frame to hit with, with no vibration (I didn't realise how much the HEADs all vibrate til now) and a lovely feel, but the quality control is amazing. They are all the same!


Even though these aren't the Bio frames I still like posting this picture when applicable.

http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/6281/mfil200stockweightandba.jpg

Racquet weights from left to right*:
1. 344g
2. 344g
3. 342g
4. 344g
5. 343g
6. 346g
7. 344g

sureshs
03-04-2011, 02:28 PM
I've gathered some useful information today.

I just went to my regular tennis shop, as I am used to, but since I had some free time I decided to spend it talking to the owner of the shop, who I knew since a long time ago and is kinda a friend of my.

I talked to him about this, and he told me one very interesting fact.

If you take a look at the composition of a certain racket, let's say a Youtek Prestige, you may read something like graphite + d3o or something similar. Furthermore, if you look for the composition of a Aeropro Drive, you may come across to a "100 % HMG", wright?

Well, not in fact. That's in some ways wrong.

He told me that every brand who provides rackets for them sends them a list with the REAL composition of the rackets, and the percentage of carbon they had. To my surprise, some of them had only a 60 % of graphite (I think it was a Babolat Extra Sweetspot). I was told that there's no racket with a REAL construction of 100 % graphite, just because in the mortals market there isn't such thing. And, luckily, he also pointed out the fact that my K 6.1 90 was one of the rackets with the highest % of carbon on its construction. Maybe that can explain the differences in what has to do with the quality construction of the rackets. How does that sound?

How much of the racquet is the resin which binds together the graphite fibers?

Best99
03-04-2011, 07:10 PM
I would love to know it :)

So I assume at this point we can point out that:

1) The composition of the rackets vary much more than at least I have thought they'd vary

2) The fact that a specific racket is "100 % Graphite" is not correct

Best99
03-04-2011, 07:21 PM
Ultimately, we don't know all the reasons why Head is producing frames in Austria for the pros.



Do you know at least a reason? If so, please tell us!

JK [Slovakia]
03-05-2011, 02:31 AM
dunlop quality is not so good as it looks. weight and balance is maybe same, but swingweight is very very different from 304-320 on biometic 300

Timbo's hopeless slice
03-05-2011, 03:56 AM
;5465525']dunlop quality is not so good as it looks. weight and balance is maybe same, but swingweight is very very different from 304-320 on biometic 300

I would love you to explain how, on 2 racquets with the same weight and balance (your words) the swingweight can possibly vary?

I have 3 bio 300s, I have them all strung the same and I use whichever one comes first to hand out of the bag. They play exactly the same from racquet to racquet.

GoaLaSSo
03-05-2011, 05:59 AM
Volkl racquets!!!

I have two identical power bridge 10s and the paint doesn't chip when I scrape the ground. It scratches a bit, but they really are very high quality sticks.

I used to have to weight my babolats differently to match them :/

JK [Slovakia]
03-05-2011, 09:46 AM
I would love you to explain how, on 2 racquets with the same weight and balance (your words) the swingweight can possibly vary?

I have 3 bio 300s, I have them all strung the same and I use whichever one comes first to hand out of the bag. They play exactly the same from racquet to racquet.

are you serious with your question?
- 2 grams on balance point
- 1 gram on each end
balance and weight remains the same, but swingweight will be higher on 2nd racquet

mtommer
03-05-2011, 09:53 AM
2) The fact that a specific racket is "100 % Graphite" is not correct

Carbon pre-preg sheets are still considered "100% carbon" or rather just "carbon" which would translate to the 100% carbon from a marketing/product offering point of view.

Best99
03-06-2011, 05:16 PM
Carbon pre-preg sheets are still considered "100% carbon" or rather just "carbon" which would translate to the 100% carbon from a marketing/product offering point of view.

But AFAIK those sheets can come with different compositions. Which one would you prefere, a sheet with 60 % or real carbon or another with 80 %?

Timbo's hopeless slice
03-06-2011, 05:39 PM
;5465908']are you serious with your question?
- 2 grams on balance point
- 1 gram on each end
balance and weight remains the same, but swingweight will be higher on 2nd racquet


erm, if you do this on, say, a 309g racquet, you will then have a 313g racquet...

that isn't the same weight :confused:

Bobby Jr
03-06-2011, 06:03 PM
erm, if you do this on, say, a 309g racquet, you will then have a 313g racquet...

that isn't the same weight :confused:
I think what he meant was putting 2g at the balance point on frame A and putting 1g at each end of frame B (assuming you put the 1g weights in the right places so as not to change the balance)

Both racquets would then still be the same weight and balance but the swing-weight would not necessarily.

Timbo's hopeless slice
03-06-2011, 07:11 PM
ohh, i see what he means.

I dunno if he's right about the swingweight, I'd have to try it, but I see what he meant, now

thanks for that

LPShanet
03-06-2011, 11:29 PM
ohh, i see what he means.

I dunno if he's right about the swingweight, I'd have to try it, but I see what he meant, now

thanks for that

In simpler terms, swingweight allows for where on the frame the weight is placed. A frame with the same weight and balance can still have the weight distributed differently, depending on how much is concentrated in one specific spot (think Wilson PWS vs. simply spreading the weight evenly across that area of the frame).

LPShanet
03-06-2011, 11:32 PM
head and babolat aren't american

And if we're being technical/semantic about it, you could argue that Wilson isn't either, as it's now Finnish owned. Among the majors, Prince may be the only American-owned company.

LPShanet
03-06-2011, 11:36 PM
Here we go with this crap again. Pros play with Austrian frames, in part, because the factories in China are set up to produce mass numbers of racquet of a different composition. They aren't really set up to produce a few thousand of a different spec for the pro players. Ultimately, we don't know all the reasons why Head is producing frames in Austria for the pros.

As for actual quality, just look at the spec variations of Fischer racquets, Kneissl, and Wilson racquets. All are made in China BUT, the first two have great quality control. the Kneissl even has the old school feel with the kevlar tendons. The difference if you haven't figured it out yet is the company (or their requirements), not where the racquet is made. Why don't you take two Head Radicals from the 90's and see how close to spec they are. I bet it won't be better than the current China frames. I agree that the old racquets felt better. But that has to do with the composition and design of the frame, a decision made by Wilson/Head/Prince, not a consequence of Chinese production.

While I'm mythbusting here, it's worth pointing out that MANY pros are currently using Head racquets that are made in China (albeit pro stock ones). Fewer are using the Austrian models each year, and it appears they may be trying to phase them out totally at some point.

LPShanet
03-06-2011, 11:47 PM
In your opinion, which is/are the best quality racquets made in China?

In my opinion, this varies year to year, as racquet companies (who are essentially marketers, and subcontract the racquets from OEMs) can change their requested tolerances at any time. The quality control level is a choice, and is a price decision, not a function of who has more skill/talent at making frames. However, there are a few makers who are known to produce especially good frames, and I agree with VSBabolat's overall list.

One thing to keep in mind, though, when we discuss "quality" is that we're all talking about different things here, a bit like the blind men and the elephant.

- One definition of quality has to do with quality control. This is determined mainly by the tolerances selected (and paid for) by the company...in other words, how different the average frames are from each other (how much variance in specs). The main result of higher quality control is simply that they throw out more "duds" during production for being outside the range specified so that the ones that make it to the store vary less. This doesn't mean that the design, quality of finish or materials are any better!

- Another definition of quality has to do with how good the design of the frame is. This may affect the performance of the frame in play and/or durability. This can be totally unrelated to quality control. There are many companies with excellent designs and poor quality control and vice versa.

- Yet another definition of quality has to do with construction, build quality, finish, materials and the like (and we can even break down quality separately by those parameters if we want). This may affect how long your frame looks good, how easily it is damaged, how strong/durable it is, etc. This again is totally independent of quality control (consistency) and design (the idea behind the frame). As with the other types of "quality", this can exist independently of the other types of quality.

So it's really pointless to discuss quality without specifying what we mean. And very few companies do all of these things well. So when someone refers to a company's racquets as junk because the paint chips, that's a very different discussion from someone else being upset when two or three frames of the same model don't have the same weight and balance. And likewise, neither of those things has anything to do with when someone who doesn't like the feel of certain maker's frames thinks they're terrible because they feel "hollow", when really they're just reacting to an intentional design decision that makes the frame feel light, crisp and awesome to another poster.

In the end, this discussion is a bit like flailing in the dark until people are more specific and understand "quality" a bit better.

Oh, and this whole thread is probably posted in the wrong forum, too...I think the "Racquets" section of the Equipment boards might be more appropriate.

Fedace
03-07-2011, 12:18 AM
Japan by far makes the best Rackets in history of racket making. Chinese are just copycats with Poor quality. They value Quantity over Quality.

vincent_tennis
03-07-2011, 07:18 AM
Here we go with this crap again. Pros play with Austrian frames, in part, because the factories in China are set up to produce mass numbers of racquet of a different composition. They aren't really set up to produce a few thousand of a different spec for the pro players. Ultimately, we don't know all the reasons why Head is producing frames in Austria for the pros.

As for actual quality, just look at the spec variations of Fischer racquets, Kneissl, and Wilson racquets. All are made in China BUT, the first two have great quality control. the Kneissl even has the old school feel with the kevlar tendons. The difference if you haven't figured it out yet is the company (or their requirements), not where the racquet is made. Why don't you take two Head Radicals from the 90's and see how close to spec they are. I bet it won't be better than the current China frames. I agree that the old racquets felt better. But that has to do with the composition and design of the frame, a decision made by Wilson/Head/Prince, not a consequence of Chinese production.

+1
Its not WHERE but HOW.

LPShanet
03-07-2011, 09:14 AM
Japan by far makes the best Rackets in history of racket making. Chinese are just copycats with Poor quality. They value Quantity over Quality.

Did you really just post that immediately after the previous post I made addressing how to discuss quality intelligently?

vincent_tennis
03-07-2011, 10:20 AM
Did you really just post that immediately after the previous post I made addressing how to discuss quality intelligently?

Meh, theres a reason he has 20k posts....

mtommer
03-07-2011, 10:37 AM
But AFAIK those sheets can come with different compositions. Which one would you prefere, a sheet with 60 % or real carbon or another with 80 %?

You can get different thread counts in pre-preg sheets. It's still considered 100% carbon. Now, from an engineering POV, no, it's not and of course the ideal is a true 100% carbon.

As for preference, each sheet type has listed engineering specs. All of them are more than sufficiently strong enough for a tennis racquet. If anything the resin matrix used may impart different feel given the same mfg technique. In this case, one might prefer a "60%" over a higher percentage construction.

chrischris
03-07-2011, 11:23 AM
h22 and stock k blade 98

me and my buddies called the kblade the 'flakeblade' its chipping away and flakes like no racket i ever had. Plays ok though.

FedererBestTennis
03-16-2011, 01:43 PM
In your opinion, which is/are the best quality racquets made in China?
Nice oxymoron you got there.